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  • Hyperlite Mountain Gear - UltaMid 4 - White
  • Hyperlite Mountain Gear - UltaMid 4 - Green

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  • Hyperlite Mountain Gear - UltaMid 4 - White
  • Hyperlite Mountain Gear - UltaMid 4 - Green

Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 4

$865.00 - $950.00

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    • White, One Size
      $865.00
    • Green, One Size
      $950.00
    4.556

    6 Reviews

    Details

    Ultralight and ultra-protective.

    Hyperlite Mountain Gear's UltaMid 4 is a four-season shelter suitable for summer alpine climbs and winter ski tours. Weighing in a little over a pound, this compact shelter packs small and is so light in your pack that you might not believe it's even there. Its Dyneema fabric is surprisingly resilient against rain, snow, and abrasion. A waterproof two-way zipper and fully taped seams enhance protection against torrential downpours to keep you and your gear comfortably dry.

    Dual peak vents provide airflow in warmer weather, and you can open or close them for versatile coverage. There are center panel tie-outs for staking the tent down, and a middle tie-out to hang the shelter from a tree if you don't have poles, skis, or a long stick to set up inside the tent. Hyperlite designed this shelter to fit an UltaMid 4 Mesh Insert or UltaMid Mesh Insert with DCF Floor for extra shelter from the elements.

    • Dyneema floorless shelter
    • Fully taped seams
    • Waterproof two-way zipper
    • Center panel tie-outs
    • Dual peak vents with no-see-um mesh
    • Sets up with poles, skis, sticks, or hanging from a tree
    • Item #HMG000T

    Tech Specs

    Material
    Dyneema
    Capacity
    4-person
    Season
    4-season
    Wall Type
    single
    Poles
    requires 2 trekking poles
    Pole Attachment
    Dyneema Hardline
    Number of Doors
    1
    Ventilation
    dual peak vents
    Seams
    fully taped
    Interior Height
    6 ft 3 in
    Floor Dimensions
    111 x 111 in
    Packed Weight
    1 lb 5 oz
    Recommended Use
    ultralight backpacking, winter camping, alpine & expedition
    Manufacturer Warranty
    1 year

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    my Ultamid favorite shelter

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Don't have enough good things to say about this shelter. So insanely light and durable, huge amount of space, holds up to mega alaskan storms etc. It works amazing in the winter as a base camp/Kitchen setup. The ultamid pictured here has been in heavy use for over 5 years now, its ruff around the edges but still holding strong!

    my Ultamid favorite shelter

    Not up to the marketing or price

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    After seven nights in this shelter, I like it enough to not return it, but I would not purchase it again. The main issue is that the tent is delicate. The dyneema composite fabric (DCF) doesn't live up to the marketing of being nearly indestructable. DCF actually seems fragile, at least in terms of abrasion and puncture resistance. My shelter had a two inch hole in it after the third night of use. My best guess is that the moderate wind we experienced caused the fabric to rub against my pack or ski boots. My other tents in the $800+ price range are Hillebergs and have withstood extreme winter wind events and storms on icefields and glaciers. Hyperlite's statement that the ultamid offers "maximum protection at high altitudes or in harsh conditions" is highly misleading at best.



    The ultamid does fulfill a role as a relatively fair-weather, ultralight, true three-season shelter. Setup takes some practice. The x and y axes should not be over-tightened before the z axis has been adequately tightened. Once set up, it feels secure in mild conditions and roomy for two people in spring or 3-4 in summer. The shelter requires attention to ensure that the fabric does not rub against anything. The vents are inadequate and poorly designed because they do not fully open. Condensation is problematic in humid conditions such as spring skiing.



    If I were to purchase a similar shelter again, I would choose the silnylon MLD Supermid instead because the weight difference is negligible, the price is much better, the quality is comparable, the vents are more functional, and the DCF of the Ultamid offers no durability advantage.



    Picture is from skiing over memorial day weekend at the site where the hole appeared.

    Not up to the marketing or price

    Incredible space to weight ratio

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    This is great for any application where light weight and plenty of space are critical. It particularly excels for ski touring--the photo was taken on the Sierra High Route, where it comfortably slept three men and gear. With a mesh insert, it's also excellent for buggy weather, although you lose a little interior space. It covers a large footprint, so it may not always fit established tent sites, but the floorless design means you can pitch it over a few rocks with no harm done, and I've always found a good place to set it up in the High Sierra, including in summer. It's easy to repair small punctures or tears caused by abuse (I carry some cuben fiber tape).

    Incredible space to weight ratio

    Super Light and Durable

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    I have become a huge fan of Hyperlite products. Expensive but well worth every penny. I've used the Echo II shelter system on bear hunts in the Bitteroot Wilderness. I needed something larger for when I take my wife. This is now my go-to. Lots of space for more than one person or for gear in extreme weather. Had it in winds upwards of 50-60mph at Andrews Creek and it stayed firm!

    Super Light and Durable

    ultralight. but also rad

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Dyneema is a nearly unbeatable fiber in the back country, and I think that Hyperlite's shelters are mostly remarkable for their use of the material. As an impressed reviewer, I think that I can best highlight the tent's functionality by reiterating tech specs, and assuring readers that the details listed above are accurate - the ultramid weighs less than a pound and a half, is nearly indestructible, and doesn't require any set-up hardware that is not already mandatory on any backpacking trip or winter tour.
    Ski poles, bound together by a ski strap or two keep the shelter upright, while skis and ice axes keep it from blowing away.
    During the summer, when I am typically without my skis, I do end up carrying a set of light stakes, but I swap my ski poles for a set of hiking poles, and I really don't feel that the tent is any less convenient during the summer.
    I have more winter than summer experience in the shelter, and I think that the nights I've spent in the UltraMid are testament to the tent's rugged functionality. I expect most tents to withstand windy nights, but withstanding tough weather is pretty different than repelling tough weather.
    The accompanying photo was taken the morning following a night spent in winds that gusted up to 65 or so - tent is burly.

    50 mph winds, kinda loud...

    • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

    The thing weighs almost nothing, and we pitched it at the top of Anderson Peak in Tahoe, around 8.5k. Weather forecast was for calm winds but we ended up with 50 mph winds. The tent is really noisy in those conditions, and you will want to guy it out. Also bring earplugs if you want to sleep better.



    Also tent is very translucent, we had a full moon and it was like someone left the light on inside the tent.



    Bombproof, and reasonably easy to set up.

    50 mph winds, kinda loud...