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  • Shimano - Dura-Ace CS-R9100 11-Speed Cassette - One Color

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  • Shimano - Dura-Ace CS-R9100 11-Speed Cassette - One Color

Shimano Dura-Ace CS-R9100 11-Speed Cassette

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    • One Color, 11-25
      sale $189.95
    • One Color, 11-28
      sale $191.19
    • One Color, 11-30
      sale $199.95
    • One Color, 12-25
      sale $189.95
    • One Color, 12-28
      sale $189.95
    459

    9 Reviews

    Details

    Reliability is elegant.

    Shimano's groupsets often often miss call-outs for European elegance or relentless pursuit of weight loss at all cost and innovation for innovation's sake, instead earning their loyal following through the incredible dependability and meticulous engineering of the Dura-Ace CS-R9100 11-Speed Cassette. 9100 isn't a typo there, it is, in fact, a newly reworked version of Dura-Ace. When the brand introduces a new groupset, you can be sure it's actually boasting improvements you don't have to be Porte or Stannard to detect on a routine Sunday in the saddle.

    The latest release of Dura-Ace 9100 delivers subtle, thoughtful tweaks to an already intelligent collection of moving parts, retaining the romance of mechanical shifting that's becoming less common each year. The cassette adds new combinations of gearing options, including expanded options for gearing appropriate to rouleurs, climbers, and the puncheurs who demand the best of both worlds. Shimano saw no need to improve the cassette's feathery construction, trusting the same proven combination of titanium and nickel-plated steel cogs and an alloy and carbon carrier that Dura-Ace 7900 introduced two generations ago.

    Since Dura-Ace is the top-tier drivetrain in the Shimano road lineup, you might be surprised that only the largest five cogs are titanium. That's because—though it's lighter—titanium is generally more prone to wear than nickel-plated steel, and the smaller cogs are more prone to wear than the larger. Because of these material properties, Shimano only uses titanium where the softer metal doesn't create a significant negative impact.

    • Ride with more intuitive gearing on this improved cassette
    • Precisely machined cogs balance weight and durability
    • Carbon and alloy carrier blends low weight and strength
    • Item #SHI00DQ

    Tech Specs

    Cog Sizes
    11 - 25 t, 11 - 28 t, 11 - 30 t, 12 - 25 t, 12 - 28 t
    Cog Material
    [five largest cogs] titanium, [six smallest cogs] nickel-plated Cro-Moly
    Carrier Material
    carbon fiber, alloy
    Claimed Weight
    [11-25 t] 175 g, [11-30 t] 211 g
    Recommended Use
    cycling
    Manufacturer Warranty
    3 years

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Poor piece of kit

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Core has plastic NOT carbon fibre, hence why it breaks. Truth is the carbon spider thing is a marketting gimmick that breaks the truth test- and literally. Cogs attached to it flex and bend resulting in bad unintented torque drops under load, DING! The wide 5.8mm Shimano chain catches adjacent cogs. Even the 5.3mm Campy, which runs silent, will still bend this plastic mounted cogs, and drop under high load. Spacing is inexistant, and the metal is poor quality. Just several levels below the Campy XG-1190 - on one bike I have had one for 14,000 kms and it is still flawless. As it is well documented, the inner core does snap under load, tying the cyclist forever with Shimano back and forth. For a true solution to this cassette, check pics: SRAM XG-1190, Campy chain, and the new Shimano RD9100. No DA cassette, no Shimano cables. System runs powerful, silent, never grinds drops or catches. In the picture, the cassette has 14,000 kms and just replaced it. Now, if driven at 27-30km hr max, with slow climbing, it might pass the test. But 30-50km/hr with acceleration, it fails

    Poor piece of kit

    A poor piece, poor metal / plastic core

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Core has plastic NOT carbon fibre, hence why it breaks. Truth is the carbon spider thing is a marketting gimmick that breaks the truth test- and literally. Cogs attached to it flex and bend resulting in bad unintented torque drops under load, DING! The wide 5.8mm Shimano chain catches adjacent cogs. Even the 5.3mm Campy, which runs silent, will still bend this plastic mounted cogs, and drop under high load. Spacing is inexistant, and the metal is poor quality. Just several levels below the Campy XG-1190 - on one bike I have had one for 14,000 kms and it is still flawless. As it is well documented, the inner core does snap under load, tying the cyclist forever with Shimano back and forth. For a true solution to this cassette, check pics: SRAM XG-1190, Campy chain, and the new Shimano RD9100. No DA cassette, no Shimano cables. System runs powerful, silent, never grinds drops or catches. In the picture, the cassette has 14,000 kms and just replaced it.

    A poor piece, poor metal / plastic core

    Fine jewelry

    • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

    This thing belongs in a jewelry box or on display under glass. I am floored by the quality of this cassette.

    Wish I would have known sooner.

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I have 4 11 speed bikes, 2 are Campagnolo super record and 2 are Sram eTap, after spending way to much money on Campy and Sram cassettes I accidentally found out the best shifting, best gear ratio (same ratios as Campy except Shimano gives you a 28 to Campagnolo`s 27 and Sram starts to triple the big sprockets way to early), quietest running, almost the lightest (Sram is a bit lighter) cassettes you can buy and they are the least expensive by far. half the money of the Campy SR. a quality source told me this 2 years ago and I arrogantly didn't listen.. da

    It goes to 29

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I bought this DA cassette trusting Shimano's unwavering quest for quality. On that, Shimano never disappoints. Now I can run my 50/34 chainring and have plenty of gears to spin up the climbs around Park City. Guardsman, here I come.

    Great Upgrade

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    2017 S-Works Tarmac eTap. On a tech’s suggestion, I ditched my SRAM Red cassette for the Dura Ace. Immediately solved noise and occasional hung shifts. 300 miles in. Drivetrain is whisper quiet and rock solid now.

    Replaced my Ultegra

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    I decided to go with the size 12-28 to replace my ultegra cassette and I am shocked by how much better this Dura-Ace cassette is in comparison. The sizing is better and the shifting is smooth.
    Finally, I was impressed how cool the packaging was too!

    Same Shimano Quality

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    The 9100 cassette carries the same Shimano quality we all have learned to expect. Switched from an 11-28 to this 12-28 and am very pleased. The marginal amount I have lost on the top end has been greatly outweighed by the addition to the 17 tooth in the middle of the block.

    I have Dura Ace 9000 11 Speed Derailer with 11-28 CS9000 cassette. Will this 11-30 R9100 cassette work with my current derailer?

    Actually, yes it will, but Shimano won't back it up, so the official answer is no. Researched this a couple places (Lennard Zinn for example) as well as talking to a friend who is currently running the 11-30 set up and it works fine. Zinn recommends adding a link to your chain, and maybe adding a turn or two to the B spring adjustment screw to keep it quiet in the 30 cog. And don't cross chain!