Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50

Detail Images

  • Eureka - Floorplan
  • Eureka - Door
  • Eureka - Body
  • Eureka - Venting
  • Eureka - Pole Attachment
  • Eureka - Clip
  • Eureka - Pockets
  • Eureka - Spitfire Tent: 1-Person 3-Season - One Color
  • Eureka - Floorplan -
  • Eureka - Door -
  • Eureka - Body -
  • Eureka - Venting -
  • Eureka - Pole Attachment -
  • Eureka - Clip -
  • Eureka - Pockets -

Current Color

  • Eureka - Spitfire Tent: 1-Person 3-Season - One Color

Eureka Spitfire Tent: 1-Person 3-Season

$139.95

Free 2-Day shipping on orders over $50. Learn More

Select style & size:

Select options
  • Select options
    • One Color, One Size
      $139.95
    4.5516

    16 Reviews

    Details

    You know what you need?

    A little alone time it is, and the Eureka Spitfire 3-season, 1-person tent is an easy choice for fast-and-light solo travel that won't zap the bank account. It has a little more room than most solo tents, so you don't feel like you're stuffed in a coffin when you're getting some sleep or staying out of the rain. Lightweight aluminum poles reduce the overall weight, while the hoop-style design make set-ups super easy. When the skies are grey, throw on the PU-treated rain fly, and when they're clear, enjoy a bug-free sleep under the stars thanks to the no-see-um mesh canopy. 

    • 75D polyester taffeta fly (1800mm)
    • Polyester taffeta walls with no-see-um mesh
    • 75D polyester taffeta floor (1800mm)
    • One door
    • One-person capacity
    • 2lb 12oz trail weight
    • Two-pole hoop design
    • Internal storage pockets
    • Item #ERK000T

    Tech Specs

    Material
    [fly] 75D 190T polyester taffeta, PU coating (1800mm), [walls] 75D 190T polyester taffeta, 40D polyester no-see-um mesh, [floor] 75D 190T polyester taffeta, PU coating (1800mm)
    Capacity
    1-person
    Season
    3-season
    Wall Type
    double-wall
    Poles
    DAC Featherlite aluminum (8.8mm)
    Pole Attachment
    clips
    Number of Doors
    1
    Number of Vestibules
    1
    Vestibule Space
    4.4 sq ft
    Ventilation
    fly vent
    Seams
    fully sealed
    Interior Height
    40 in
    Floor Dimensions
    42 x 108 x 26 in
    Floor Space
    18.1 sq ft
    Packed Size
    5 x 21 in
    Packed Weight
    2 lb 12 oz
    Recommended Use
    backpacking
    Manufacturer Warranty
    1 year

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Kinda hard to beat...

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I just returned from several days living in this puppy climbing the Crestones in CO and had to finally review it. It's really a great little tent for the price. Swap the stakes with some MSR mini groundhog, make yourself a footprint from some TyVek, and you have a sweet, snug, light little option here. I'm 6 foot and about 180 lbs and find to be be about perfect with room at my head and feet for loose small gear and enough coverage from the rain fly to shelter my daypack, boots, helmet, other etc items. The two small interior pockets hold small things, and I really like the roof vent too for those afternoon rain sessions which can sometimes het boggy. It'd be nice if it were free-standing, but hey, my brother's Big Agnes single costs three times the Spitfire and claims to do so but can't really unless it's set up in a windless garage. If you're cool with the basics and are on a budget(wait for the sale), look no further. Pardon my upper thigh shot.

    Kinda hard to beat...

    Go to for solo adventures - Great value

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Eureka may not be on gear-heads top of the list, but this tent is hands down best value for price, weight, quality of material and ease of use. I have been using this tent for two seasons in Northern Minnesota and it is my go to for bike-packing and quick solo back-country trips. No need to spend double on the "cool kid" brands if you could have this tent in your quiver of options.

    Hits the tent-or-bevy sweet spot!

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Roomy enough. You can sit up to change. I've used just the screened part, less the fly, in the summer, as a bug tent. With the rain fly, all buttoned down, It will condensate at altitude and on cold nights. Works well in rain and wind. Very easy to set up with pole-clip system. Use rocks instead of tent pegs. Lose the stuff sacks. Very nice tent: I put away my bivy and dome tents. I love this tent.

    Useless in many situations...

      This tent is not freestanding, you need to stake both ends for it to stand up. This should be noted in the description of the tent but is conveniently left out. At least 75% of my camping is on rocks or very rocky areas which renders the tent useless (unless you can find something to attach the ends). I would not recommend this tent if you plan to use the tent in rocky regions. Outside of that, the tent performed okay not great...would not buy again.

      Never should have gotten rid of this one

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      I sold this tent to a friend who needed one and I thought I wanted a bigger tent. I made a big mistake. This tent was was my shelter while doing backcountry trail work, and its lightweight was very welcomed when I was carrying 8 days of food, a pulaski, cutter mattock a single jack and protective equipment.

      The downsides: the vestibules are really only big enough for your boots. Plan on your bag sitting outside. It's a little claustrophobic, but I was too tired most nights to care. Might be a little tight for sitting out a day and night of rain, so check your forecast, but don't worry. You will be dry. It's not free standing, but just put in a stake at the foot corner and one at the head and you'll be solid for most nights.

      Condensation was never too much of a problem, then again I was in Arizona.

      I used this in 90 degree nights and snow storms. I don't know what else to say. Are there lighter tents? Yeah. But be prepared to shell out an extra $100 or more. Hell, you'll pay $100 for other solo tents that are a pound or two heavier.

      gimme shelter

      • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

      Easy to set up and tear down. It worked well in the rain and the vestibule kept my pack and boots dry. It is nice to be able to sit up in the tent and get dressed/undressed without major effort. I am 5'9" and the space in the tent was adequate. Some storage pockets would be useful to hang a headlamp or store small items.

      Kickass Little Backpacking Tent

      • Familiarity: I've used it several times

      First off, the Spitfire is a badass little trail companion. There's simply nothing else close to it for anywhere near the price.

      I picked up this tent as a replacement for a ~2lb tarp / bivvy combo hoping to sacrifice a little weight for the comfort of a real tent - and it delivered admirably. At 5'8", 165lb, the Spitfire has plenty of space for me and gear, and the option to free up more by shoving my pack in the small vestibule. Without the pack inside, there's ample room for boots at my feet, clothes / etc by my head, and a dog next to me. I can stretch my arms out full length and am a little under touching both ends with toes and fingers - but the interior height really makes the thing feel spacious.

      Although it's not freestanding, I've had essentially zero trouble finding ways to pitch the Spitfire - it only uses two critical stakes to stay sturdy, although I tend to stake all 6 points plus the two on the fly when I use it.

      I dig the roof vent, which I can reach through a zipper in the roof of the main tent to close if I need to. I dig how taut I can get the fly with only two extra stake points and two guy lines. I dig the weight. I especially dig the packability - I can get the tent, fly and MSR mini groundhogs to fit easily inside an 8L Sea to Summit Ultrasil dry bag, and the two poles shove neatly into the back corner of my pack behind everything else. When there's little chance of rain, I'll fold up the fly around the tent into a rectangle and put it at the bottom of the pack - with everything else on top, the combo compresses almost completely flat.

      It's stood up well to warm and cold, rain and shine.

      My only complaints are that the fly is made of heavy material, and I'd love to see Eureka do a clone with a silnylon or similar fly and floor as I think this could drastically reduce the weight an already excellent design. The poles have little angled sections that can be confusing at first to collapse the right way, but you get used to it quickly. I'd also be interested in a second door for easy access to the other side of the fly, where there is equal space to the main vestibule and could be used to store more gear.

      Overall, however, it's hard to complain for $140 bucks. The Spitfire is a light, packable, durable shelter you'll love for solo and group trips alike.

      So far so good

      • Familiarity: I've used it several times

      Got this tent because it was one of the least expensive while also being one of the lightest 1-man tents. Put it through the paces for 10 nights in a row at Philmont Scout Reserve. No problems at all. Quick to set up and overall small package in the pack. Did not have torrential rain, so can't yet speak to water situations. Would recommend footprint or ground cloth to protect tent bottom. Only one door so be selective in where you point the door. Vestibule is only good for boots, no room for a pack in tent either.

      So far so good

      Great little tent

      • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

      Just got back from a two night trip in the hot, humid Alabama Summer.
      Setup was pretty easy for the first time. It isn't free standing, but only two stakes are required to get it set up. The inside is decently roomy for a one person tent. I had enough room to sleep on my side with my knees bent and could stretch my hands above my head when on my back (I am 5'10"). The foot-end could be a tad wider or taller, my feet touched the top of the net if I wasn't scooted way to the top of the tent...no big deal though.
      There is more than enough room to sit up and read, I never felt too confined in it. There are two gear pouches provided on the side opposite the zipper, a loop above the head/chest area and one close to the knee. I clipped a small carabiner to one and hung a lantern for reading.
      I was trying to decide between a few other Eureka! tents in this price range and the door on the side is what ultimately sold me. Getting in/out is super easy, as well as loading and unloading gear. I much prefer this to my two person tent, which has one entrance at the front.

      The first night I slept without the fly, I stayed nice and cool. The mesh does a great job of keeping air moving through the tent, but the high sides keep it from going directly over you. This will be pretty beneficial once it cools down.
      We were expecting rain on the second night, so I set the fly up. It's ridiculously easy to get on, and even easier to get taught. I didn't need any extra staking (even though there are lots of points for them) to get nice straight lines on every side. There are also spots of velcro to tie the fly to the poles. Pretty standard feature, but nice to have nonetheless.
      There's adequate room under the vestibules for gear, although it's going to be tight if you have a larger pack.
      I stayed dry throughout the entire night, and the vent (which is accessible from the inside) was super easy to pop up. It really helped get some ventilation going. No issues with condensation either. The snap at the bottom of the zipper of the rainfly is nice as well.

      With everything (stuff sack, stakes, tent, and fly) it comes to 3 pounds, 9.6 ounces on my scale. Definitely could be made lighter with some different stakes, maybe ditching the stuff sack as well.

      I'm really looking forward to putting some more nights into this thing!

      Great value, super light

      • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

      Took this on an autumn through hiking trip in Northern Sweden. Kept me dry in rain, ice, wind and snow, super easy to setup and takedown, and nice and light. Honestly, for $140 I wasn't expecting it to perform so well. That said, I might say 3 season is a little more like 2.5 season. With wind and dropping autumn temps, I was pretty chilly. If using this tent in shoulder seasons of spring or fall, think carefully about weather. But that's the tradeoff for getting something so lightweight, so pick your poison!

      Great value, super light

      awesome for the price

        My Spitfire solo is 11 yrs old and is still going strong. I would like a new tent, but I cant for the life of me find anything better. reasonably priced, light weight, water tight. I would say that I have over 90 nights backpacking with the old model. The new model is lighter yet. So. my next tent will be another Spitfire.

        Excellent tent

          I borrowed this tent from a friend to backpack with. It is easily set up and taken down and held up well in the wind. I would absolutely use this tent again.

          Excellent tent

          Nothing better for the price.

          • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

          Is rarely you can find a lightweight and quality tent for this price.
          To be bluntly honest i was a little concern but again the price gain me over. I had multiple solo tents from msr, north face, mountain hardware and other brands , more expensive and heavier.
          The trail weight of the tent is 2lb and 7oz lighter than the MSR Hubba which retails 3 times the price.
          The interior of the tent is big enough for a 6'4 person with room to spare on the side for additional items and you can fully sit up thanks to the 42" interior height.
          The mesh provides plenty ventilation for no condensation just make sure the tent is properly taut otherwise the fly be directly on the mesh above your head. The side entrance roll up mesh panel makes a difference since the vestibule is not large enough for cooking but the design on the fly allows you to insert a trekking pole by releasing one of the clip attachments creating an awning under the rain.
          I had this tent under 6" of snow with all guidelines attach and had almost no condensation inside and no damage to the 8.8mm poles. (thats really impressive for a 3 season tent)
          This tent is a super bargain...the only con is the one way zipper at the entrance which if you are not careful will get stuck in the interior flap.


          Good lightweight solo tent

          • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

          My previous solo tent was light and convenient but had a peak height of only 28" which made sitting up impossible and getting dressed inside a bit of a chore. So I was looking for more height and this tent provides that with room to spare - easy to sit up in and to get dressed. I'm 6', 160 lbs. and there's plenty of room for me and my gear. Haven't been through any storms yet, but the quality appears to be good with nice even seams, smoothly operating zippers, and secure attachments for the stake pullouts and pole clips. So I expect it to hold up well over the years. The roof vent that can be adjusted from inside is a nice touch - can be left open normally but closed if wind-driven rain should start to come in. Comes with steel pin-style stakes which are both heavy and not very secure in loose soil so I've replaced them with a pair of aluminum triangular stakes for better holding power at the tent ends and very light titanium pin-style stakes to hold out the fly.

          Good lightweight solo tent

          I've now used the Eureka Spitfire for about a month's worth of overnights and would raise my rating from 4 to 5. It's been through a very intense thunderstorm, some hail, and a bit of snow without any issues and still looks like new after extended bicycle camping and backpacking trips.

          Great Solo Tent With One Caveat

          • Familiarity: I've used it several times

          I've had this tent for about six months and have used it four times in Fall and Winter conditions. The two most important criteria for me when I purchased this tent were weight--I wanted something less than three and a half pounds--and peak height. While there are plenty of solo and two person tents that weigh less than three and a half pounds there are very few that have a peak height of 40 inches or more. By the time I had whittled my list down to two tents it was between this and the Big Agnes Angel Springs UL 2. (I know, they're not really comparable tents, but those were the two I was considering.) The Spitfire 1 won out in the final analysis because it offered everything I wanted at a price that wouldn't make me feel bad if I used it once and then put it in the garage sale pile.

          Bottom line: I love this tent. At three and a half pounds it met my weight criteria. With a 40 inch peak height I could actually sit up and still have an inch or two of spare headroom. In a compression sack it squishes down to the size of large loaf of bread. For a non-freestanding tent it's pretty easy to set up. There's just enough room for me and my gear and I haven't had any condensation issues or leaks in everything from sub 20 degree nights, rain, sleet and snow. The verdict on long term durability remains to be seen, but the tent appears to be well constructed and I haven't noticed any separating seams or undo wear. After four trips--and I do use a footprint--the tent still looks brand new.

          The one caveat is that while it has a very generous peak height for this class of tent it isn't very long. At 5' 8 I'm a short guy and if I was much taller the length would be an issue. If you're 6 feet or taller then I'm pretty sure that your head and feet would be touching at the ends. Having said that, if you can live with the length and you're looking for a lightweight solo non-freestanding tent this is an outstanding value and I think it will likely give you many years of good service.

          Great Solo Tent With One Caveat

          Rolled up

          Here is how the I had the tent place on the rack. It isn't the smallest tent when rolled up, but it also isn't very heavy or super huge. Can compare the size with the bike or the Z-Lite Pad next to it. Everything fit in the bag plus the footprint that I got extra, so I has a little bit of room for the sloppy mornings when you don't have the energy to get it perfect.

          Rolled up

          And a little vent!

          This picture shows a better view of the vent with the little flap that can be accessed from inside to close or open the vent. Also shows a little bit more of the screen walls and the space on the inside.

          And a little vent!

          Hey Randy, the fly isn't normally that loose, it was just a poor pitch job on my part. We rolled into the campground late at night, the ground was too hard for some good lines and I was just too lazy to set it up perfect. When set up correctly the fly is nice and tight from what I have found.

          Entry-side

          This was the morning after our first night of bike touring through Kanarraville, UT. Sleeping bag fits great with a pad, some space above the head and below the feet, and plenty of room by the shoulders to more around a little. The screen door rolls up and can be held in place, same with the fly so they get out of your way and make getting in and out easy.

          Entry-side

          Is this tent waterproof/resistent?

          Hey Alex,

          The rainfly on the Eureka Spitfire is made of polyester taffeta with a PU coating to make it waterproof. Feel free to contact me directly with any additional questions about backpacking tents.

          Kyle L. - Expert Gearhead