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  • Backcountry Access - BC Link - One Color

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  • Backcountry Access - BC Link - One Color

Backcountry Access BC Link

$149.95

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    • One Color, One Size
      $149.95
    4.5535

    35 Reviews

    Details

    Safer backcountry travel through real-time communication.

    As an experienced backcountry traveler, you know the importance of having a plan, being equipped with the proper gear, and staying in contact with your group at all times. Apart from changing conditions and gear malfunctions, one of biggest variables you'll encounter in the backcountry is group communication—help boost communication with the BCA BC Link Group Communication System. This lightweight microphone and radio/battery pack keeps the lines of communication open whether you're making an on-mountain change of course while backpacking, warning of an on-going slide when you're backcountry skiing, or coordinating search and rescue efforts in the event of an emergency.

    Designed to fit neatly with BCA's Stash series of packs, this 2-way radio will grab onto any ol' pack you have. Both units are designed to be water- and dust-resistant to deal with snow and storage. With 22 FRS and GMRS channels, and 121 sub-channels, you should have constant clarity when conveying critical information. Compatible with all standard FRS/GMRS radios, you'll be able to stay in touch with others not lucky enough to have this little number.

    The base unit can clip to your belt or pack, or you can stash it inside a pack pocket. The cord connecting the radio to the Smart Mic has an alligator clip to keep stray wires out of your way. Glove-friendly controls on the mic make it easy to share information without risking frostbitten fingertips. You get a 2.5-mile line-of-sight range and up to 140 hours of battery life. The 3.7-Volt lithium ion battery can be recharged, so you've no excuse for not being fully prepared for any excursion in the wilderness, be it snow-covered or summertime.

    • Group Communication System with Smart Mic and base unit
    • Water and dust resistance to IP56 standards
    • Compatible with all standard FRS/GMRS radios
    • 2.5-mile line-of-sight range
    • 140 hour maximum battery life
    • -20C/-4F to +70C/158F temperature operating range
    • Smart Mic is compatible with 3.5mm TS or TRS earphone plug
    • Battery charger included
    • Item #BCA000C

    Tech Specs

    Material
    [case] polycarbonate
    Power Output
    [GMRS] 1.0 watts, [FRS] 0.5 watts
    Channels
    22 FRS/GMRS, 121 sub-channels
    Remote Mic
    yes
    Battery
    rechargebale 3.7V lithium ion
    Dimensions
    [Smart Mic] 3.3 x 1.0 x 1.8 in, [base unit] 2.5 x 2.0 x 6.0 in
    Weight
    12 oz
    Recommended Use
    backcountry touring, hiking, backpacking
    Manufacturer Warranty
    3 years limited

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Communication is key to safety

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    The link radios come into the backcountry with my partners and me every time. Radios are a good way to keep communication clear and precise while traveling in avalanche terrain and skiing slopes 'one at a time'. If I have a radio in my pocket, I will likely not bother to stop and take it out in order to reach my partners. The Link's smart mic, which is hooked onto the strap of my pack, allows me to easily push a button and connect with my partners. Clear communication is definitely a piece of the backcountry safety puzzle.

    Simple & Bomb Proof

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    These radios have everything you need and nothing you don't. No need for a computer science degree to use them. Set your channel, string the smart mic into your pack and it's ready to go. No fumbling around with pockets and zippers as your trying to drop in or get in touch with a slower part of your group. The ease of use and convenience of these radios is sure to make you and your group safer and more efficient in the backcountry.

    Clear sound and easy to use

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    After years of dealing with a talkabout in the jacket pocket I definitely appreciated the ease of use with the mic on this radio. Always helps out so much to have communication with your party in the backcountry and this product makes it that much easier.

    Safe Day in the BC thanks to Link Radios

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    The BC Link radios are very reliable when going into the backcountry. Communication is very important when going into the backcountry and these radios do just that. Last year on Vail pass, mid January, my friend and I were snowmobiling/skiing and it was very cold. It was snowing and we had been getting snow for about two days now, so we knew we were in for some good snow. The outside temp was about 30 degrees Fahrenheit with a wind chill making it about 15 degrees. We had gone to a spot we both know and it requires about a 20-minute skin from the snowmobiles. From the top of the run you can only see the bottom and nothing in between. With the BC Link's we were able to communicate with one another from the top and the bottom easily in the middle of a cold and snowy winter. The smart mic made it even more accessible as we did not have to go through our bags looking for our radios. The batteries also lasted all day on both radios after a full nights charge. The BC Link radios are a necessity when going into the backcountry and BCA have made these radios super easy to use and very reliable.

    excellent communication pieces

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    These are great for all 4 season, not just the winter. Whether it is doing long multi pitch trad, or gnarry ski lines, these get the job done. Definitely helps with that little bit of safety and communication in the backcountry

    Communication is key

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Seems like radios are overlooked by a lot of people who spend time in the backcountry. The Link makes it very easy to stay in constant communication with your partners while recreating in the backcountry. A must have!

    Stay Safe, Stay In-Touch

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Communication is one of the biggest threats to having a safe day in the backcountry. These radios have continually worked great for me and my partners. Whether it's talking a friend down a technical line, reporting unstable snow or just locating someone who was separated from the group. The link radio has helped us keep communication flowing and avoid dangerous situations. The smart Mic allows easy use of the radio without having to take off your glove to open a pocket or access your pack.

    Stay Safe, Stay In-Touch

    These are really Fantastic

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I Love using these, i have only used them once for skiing but they worked really well in cold weather, i kept it on the outside of my jacket and was worried about the snow and water on it, but it preformed perfectly throughout the day! I usually use these for climbing as i am a much bigger multi-pitch climber then i am a skier. Let me tell you, when you are a climber that is in the middle of his third pitch the last thing you want to happen, is loosing your ability to hear and see your partner, it makes it extremely difficult to navigate and maneuver the route, you wont be able to ask for "slack" or "take" so that you may take a break or make a larger move, these radios work really really well for my multi-pitches, due to there long range, i never have to worry about climbing too far from my partner, they also have really fantastic clips on them, they make it super easy to secure the radio anywhere you need to!! If you go multi-pitching or climbing a lot and you constantly have the problem, that you are loosing contact with your partner, then i would recommend these walkies, they are really simple and easy to use, lightweight, and then option to save multiple weather channels helps a ton for anticipating bad weather!

    Having good communication is killer.

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    These radios kick ass, great range, great quailty and long battery life. The clip is nice and burely I thought it in my BCA float and run the coil out under my armpit and clip it on the pack strap.

    Top Radio for the backcountry

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Having a radio in the backcountry makes great sense. With wind, even 20 metres of distance can mean shouting yourself hoarse and still not being heard. Having the ability to squirrel the radio in a pocket so the battery stays warm and a mic extension on your pack chest strap is gold. No more stopping and getting the unit out of your pocket. Charges with a USB cable. Highly recommended, although I haven't tried it at long ranges.

    Top Radio for the backcountry

    Game Changer

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Can't believe we ever skied without them! I've used it for two years and now and never head to the backcountry without it. The open line of communication, regardless of the conditions, has eliminated any guesswork when ascending and descending. Being able to communicate with a skier after you have lost sight of them has made our group more efficient and more safe.

    The radios are bomber, battery life is huge (I've left mine on for an entire yurt trip and it was still going 5 days later), remote mic is plenty loud and clear. Hardest part is figuring out how to snake it through the arm strap of your backpack and where to stow the actual radio. Every pack is different, but I've always found a way.

    If you are on the fence about these radios, by all means pull the trigger!

    Huge upgrade for the crew

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    I know pretty much nothing about radios. I just picked these since they are made by BCA which is a cool company who makes trustworthy ski gear. I've used them twice in the backcountry so far and we (myself and the friends who also bought them to use together) are stoked we took the plunge. The convenience, safety, and efficiency of having such easy communication makes for more fun and less hassle.

    It seems strange to me that you can't use the radio without the mic unit. This is a little annoying for things like road trips where I just want basic communication between cars. Then again, the mic unit is why I bought this and what I love about it so that is a very minor gripe.

    My biggest advice would be to make sure you and everyone you're using these with has matching presets before heading out. We encountered some confusion as individuals started to go rogue on their channel selections. That is probably radio 101, but none of us were ever enrolled in radio 101.

    Bomber

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Nothing feels worse than winding up in a bad situation that could have been avoided by clear communication. That’s why Backcountry Access built upon their reactive safety equipment and created the BC Link Radio, one of the most important tools in preventative avalanche safety.
    The benefits of radio communication in the backcountry are apparent: know where your partners are, stay organized, relay new information, and react quickly and effectively to situations. Simply, it beats yelling and hoping you are heard. With the BC Link, you get not only solid communication but a radio designed specifically for backcountry skiing and riding.
    Digging through you pack before fumbling with a walkie talkie is a pain, and a thing of the past with BCA’s radios. There is a handheld component which plugs into the actual radio, allowing you to store the radio in your pack but clip the mic and channel selector in an accessible place. I bury my radio at the bottom of my pack and feed the handheld part through strap storage slits/hydration hose openings/or airbag trigger channels. Whenever I am skiing or hiking, the mic is easily within reach without getting in the way.
    A two piece radio can be bulky and heavy, but BCA kept the weight down to 12oz with a slim profile. That means you won’t have to leave out that extra victory beer, and you won’t notice the cost of hauling two-way communication to the top of every line. And just to put the icing on the design-cake, the entire body is waterproof. That’s something to be thankful for.
    One of the most valuable features is the number of unique channels. With 22 standard channels and 121 sub-channels, you can choose your presets and bounce to an open chalnnel as needed. This is huge when in the sidecountry or within range of other parties.
    Lasty there’s good news on the downfall of all outdoor electronics: battery life. BC Link radios come with a solid battery, strong enough to keep your channel open for up to four days in extreme cold. After using BC Links for over two years, I have never had a battery die unexpectedly, even in severe cold.
    So there you have it, a vital safety tool for winter adventures designed and built for what we all love to do. From the handheld interface to size and durability to bomber battery life, the BC Link Radio is the best in backcountry communication.

    Bomber

    Communication is critical

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    As a guide and BC skier in potentially dangerous terrain communication is critical. Often no radio is needed and the weather and conditions are totally manageable. Other times, it's a different situation, I need all the help I can get and the BC Link radio is an excellent tool. Here are just two reasons: Wind can break down communication almost immediately and having a easy communication via radio is awesome. Visual connection to the group can be challenging if you need to ski a line all the way to the bottom (or around a corner to an island of safety) out of sight of your partners. And the list for why you should carry a radio goes on...
    The BC Link works well:
    Because you don't need to take off your gloves to use it.
    Because the base unit is warm in your pack and not exposed to the elements.
    Because the base unit is away from your beacon (which is typically in your front pocket or on a harness on the front of your body - beacon and radio don't always get along well...)
    Because it can be mounted on your pack strap for simple, quick, easy, and efficient use...

    A must for communication

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I love my BCA link radios. They make my travel in the backcountry smoother and safer. The radio has an easier to use interface with pre-programable channels. With the speaker piece attachable to a backpack strap, you always have easy communication with your crew!

    Communication in Cruxes

    These radios are incredible. They are powerful tools in the backcountry. Line-of-Sight communication is impressive and non-direct is as well. We used these on our Yukon Ski Expedition this past spring.. and after a part of our team got hit with a powder cloud from a calving serac we were able to communicate quickly and access the situation post-avalanche (note the climbers in the bottom left of the photo). We were also able to give them warning. There is nothing better in the field than the ability to communicate clearly and concisely with your teammates when you split up into teams. Also as a mountain guide, it is so helpful to have another/alternate resource for communication with clients when, for example, the wind picks up or if you are separated by terrain features and providing instruction and direction for route-finding and safety. The radios maintained excellent battery strength in the sub-zero environments and were strong and durable for our crew - all of who are typically hard on gear. Lastly, they have simple yet excellent features like a lock mode (for clients etc) and other easy programming to utilize in various environments/circumstances. Highly recommend these radios for any backcountry/mountain traveler.

    Communication in Cruxes

    Great backcountry tool

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I think radios are the most under glorified backcountry tool out there. The ability to be in direct communication with all group members, especially in complex terrain or whiteout/stormy conditions is incredibly helpful and BCA makes it easy. This radio is compact, has a long batterie life, very clear sound, and is easy to use even for technology dunces like me.

    This is a great improvement!

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I use these for clients skiing. The battery last a long time time and the pre programming makes it east to talk to other guides or people in their group. Having the the mic closer to peoples ears and not in a pocket helps you get the point across crystal clear. Used in Haines and in Chile.

    Wouldn't go without them

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    You don't think you need a radio til you use em. These radios are great, just clip them on your shoulder strap and stay in touch with your friends. Whether snowmobiling, skiing or just keeping in contact in the backcountry, i take them with me every time now. Great battery life and easily stores in your pack with the handpiece easily accessible on your shoulder so you don't have to fumble with pulling out a handheld one. Had two last season and picked up two more so all my friends can use them when were out. Well worth the buy.

    Can these be used without wearing a backpack? I'm sure the answer is yes, but I'm curious how you would set it up, where to put the base unit and speaker?

    They can be used without the backpack. The nice part of the BCA backpack is that it holds the base unit away from your Beacon. If your not wearing a beacon you can put the base unit on your pants right above your butt then have the cord run up your back and clip the mouth piece onto your collar. If you are wearing the beacon you really need to keep the base unit away from that so it does not interfere with the frequency.

    Where might I get a new antennae for my BCA two way radio? Mine kept popping apart and I finally lost it.

    Has anybody noticed any issues with the lower temperature limit of -4f? That seems relatively high when built for use in low temperatures sports.

    Will this radio be able to communicate with standard ski patrolling radio set-ups incase you get in a bind touring side country?

    Yes. The user of the ski patroller (UHF/VHF) radio would need to know the frequency (channel) that the BC Link owner is using. The patroller could then program his or her UHF/VHF radio "down" to that frequency. However, BC Link and other "family band" FRS/GMRS radios are not allowed to use the high-power frequencies that patrols and other authorities use, so you can't program "up" to those frequencies from the BC Link. As long as you use the FRS/GMRS channels, it's all good!

    Is it possible for the radio frequency to...

    Is it possible for the radio frequency to interfere with beacon signals?

    Best Answer

    Hi Joey,



    The BC Links have been used all season with a variety of beacons, with no interference being reported. It's possible what you were hearing about is the magnets in the mics that patrollers use with their VHF radios. There was concern, quite a few years ago, with certain models of Pieps beacons and the radios used by patrollers. When those were put too close together it was possible for the Pieps beacon to turn itself off. However, that was due to that particular model of beacon using a magnetic on/off switch. Fortunately, the Tracker, as well as many other beacons, uses a mechanical switch which won't be affected at all.



    If you put the beacon extremely close to the BC link, it's possible that you would experience a very slight decrease in range, much the same way you can if you keep it very close to a cell phone. (also not really recommended)



    Anyway, hope this helps clear things up!

    does the external mic have a clip to secure...

    does the external mic have a clip to secure it to the bag strap ?