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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on January 10, 2019

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I ordered size XL, which fits true to size, but the neck hole is too big, which I guess will shed more heat, but then why the long sleeves? At full retail of $180, I don't think there is a single buyer in the world for this jersey. At 50% off, it's still a stretch because it's not clear what temperature range this jersey was designed for. With a smaller neck hole (or even a zippered, raised neck), the jersey would work better for slightly cooler days. On barely warm days, I'm going to wear a 3/4 sleeve jersey and elbow guards, which will provide enough warmth. The jersey material is pretty thin and stretchy, so it certainly won't work for cold days. I think you are looking at wearing this jersey when it's about 68-72 degrees, but when it's on the upper end of that range, I would prefer to wear a 3/4 sleeve jersey.

I wore my elbow guards over the jersey, which makes the patch of tough fabric on the outside of the forearm irrelevant--the patch ends up underneath my 661 Evo elbow guard. At some point, I'll try stretching the jersey over my elbow guards, but I don't really see the point of wearing guards under the jersey. Wind resistance?

As for the color, my jersey is black with dark grey forearm patches.


Update1: For my second ride, I wore my POC DH jersey on a 66 degree, sunny afternoon, and I was fine while doing some hard climbing, but once I turned my bike downhill the saturated jersey felt really cold, so I stopped to put on a windbreaker. Okay, so it's a DH jersey, which I guess means it's not designed for pedaling. This time, I wore my POC DH jersey over my elbow guards, and I guess I looked less like a storm trooper heading out for battle, so there's that. After my first ride, I washed my POC DH jersey, and I noticed that my white sunblock didn't wash out of the inside of the collar--like it does for all my other mtb jerseys.

Update2:
If I put liquid detergent directly on the collar, the sunblock washes out. After my third time washing the jersey, I noticed one of the seams in the neck/chest area had developed a hole, so I sewed the seam back together.

The big neck hole now has a ruffled collar more appropriate for an off the shoulder evening dress, so if you are transitioning in either direction, this may be the jersey for you.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on January 4, 2019

1 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: Runs large

Nice looking and athletic fitting shorts. The Sombrio Loghorn shorts are made out of a thicker, coarser material than the Sombrio Highline shorts, so they should offer more protection in a fall. Unfortunately, after 1.5 hours of riding the raised thick seam surrounding the "seamless crotch panel" of the Sombrio Longhorn short rubs me raw--in the crotch. I have a pair of the higher priced Sombrio Highline shorts, and they do not have that problem.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on September 29, 2017

Lightweight
3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Compared to my POC VPD 2.0 knee guards, the TLD Raid knee guards are really light. After putting the TLD Raid knee guards on, my first impression was "heat", as in they are warm. For my initial test ride, I did a 1.5 hour ride, and an hour into my ride I started feeling rubbing on the inside edge of my left knee cap. When I got home, I looked on the inside of the knee cups, and there is a raised seam that runs all the way across the knee cup on both knee guards. Seriously?!! The chaffing did not break the skin, though. I'll give them a few more rides before I determine whether to return them. Now, I've had five additional rides using the knee guards, and I have not experienced the rubbing problem anymore. I've been paying more attention when I put on the knee guards so that the knee cup is centered laterally over my knee, and that seems to have solved the chaffing problem.

By the way, these are symmetrical knee guards: there is no way to tell which is the left or right knee guard. I wore the knee guards so that the straps wrapped to the outside (away from the center line of my bike), like my other knee guards.

I was on the small end of the measurements for the XL/XXL size, so I was worried that the knee guards were going to be too big, but that was not the case. Perfect fit. I rode in about 75 degree temperatures, and despite my initial impressions, I didn't notice the TLD Raid knee guards being excessively hot while I was riding.

I just checked my POC knee guards, and surprisingly they have a seam in the exact same place as the TLD knee guards, but here's the difference: the POC knee guards use a flat seam, while the TLD knee guards use a raised seam. Image of the seam running across the TLD Raid knee cup:

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on September 10, 2017

1 5

This knee guard has no relation to the Rage knee guard of old. RIP Kyle Straight-Rage knee lineage--you've been GOT. I tried these new guards on and they were super tight. I could hear the material ripping as I tried to ease them over my knee, and the protection was not what I was looking for. I've always had a pair of Rage knee guards in the rotation, but no more.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on September 1, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

Despite the Dissolve Blue color issue, the TLD Skyline shorts are really nice, light weight shorts. Of course, the lighter the weight, the less protection there is for your legs when you hit the deck. These are clearly an XC/pedally All Mountain short. In the past, TLD shorts had a weird fit on me: they fit tight 5 inches below the waist. I’m a dedicated cyclist, and I have a medium to thin, athletic build and TLD shorts never felt comfortable. These shorts do not exhibit that same cut--they fit like normal shorts; you fit the adjustable waistband to your hips, and the shorts are roomier below the waist, then they drape down your legs. The adjustment is on the outside of the waistband v. inside the waistband on Fox Altitude shorts. The legs are maybe half an inch shorter than a pair of Fox Altitude shorts that I bought (and which I’m going to return). I thought the Fox Altitude shorts must have significantly longer legs, but the Fox Altitude shorts slip down off my waist, so the legs appear to be longer.

The new TLD red chamois is thicker than the black textured chamois featured in past TLD shorts, and it looks like a high quality road chamois. I've only had one ride in these shorts, but the chamois feels pretty nice. The best mtb chamois I've ever worn is the chamois that the now defunct Jet used in their shorts. I think Jet was ahead of their time in making high quality shorts with a high quality chamois. The inner liner that came with Jet shorts was made out of a comfortable, semi loose fitting, stretchy, gray jersey material (i.e full of holes so breathable), and the thicker chamois was comparable to a high quality road chamois. I’m not sure why other mtb clothing makers don't seek out Jet and resurrect their shorts. Fox makes such a poor chamois for their mtb shorts that I wonder who runs their product development. Just obtain a pair of old Jet shorts and copy it; product development done. The TLD red chamois may be as good as the Jet chamois--we'll have to see.

One feature missing on these TLD shorts that I’d like to see are some vent holes or mesh panels along the inner thighs, but maybe the material is so lightweight it doesn’t need vent holes. The Fox Altitude shorts don’t have any vent holes or mesh either, and the material is thicker. TLD switched to zippered slash pockets on these shorts. I’m not really fond of zippered pockets--regular pockets work fine for me--but at least I can slip my hands into the TLD pockets, which is not the case with the pockets found on the Fox Altitude shorts, which have an opening that is too small. Also, when the TLD pockets are zippered shut, there is a zipper garage, which prevents you from cutting your knuckles on the zipper, which is a nice touch. The Fox Altitude shorts also have a zipper garage. TLD eliminated the horizontal zippered pocket located on the back waistband, which was kind of a signature look for TLD, but the back waistband is still cut higher allowing you to bend at the waist without revealing your backside. The Fox Altitude shorts don't have that higher cut in the back.

When I tried on the TLD shorts, my first reaction was, “These fit great. Wow, high quality. I’m keeping them. I want to go riding in them now!” Then when I took them off, "Hey, what's up with the color on the back?!” I think the TLD Skyline shorts are a higher quality short than the Fox Altitude shorts. The TLD Skyline shorts fit me better, and they have a decent chamois, so I would recommend the TLD Skyline shorts over the Fox Altitude shorts. I found the sizing of the TLD Skyline shorts to be true to size, while the Fox Altitude shorts fit bigger and feel sloppy in comparison; maybe I’m just in between sizes for the Fox Altitude shorts--I tried two sizes and I didn't find a good fit.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on September 1, 2017

Dissolve Blue image may not be accurate
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

I bought a pair of TLD Skyline shorts in the Resolve Blue colorway elsewhere, and the image of the back of the shorts does not accurately portray the colors. I'd prefer the colors shown in backcountry's image. I don't know if the shorts sold at backcountry are the same color as the ones I received or not--you might want to ask a rep. As you can see in my image below, the left side of the rear is light blue (with no dissolve) and the right side of the rear is dark blue (with dissolve into a lighter blue) , then there is a seam and below the seam the color is dark blue on both sides. It's almost as if the factory ran out of material and created a patchwork of different material to finish the shorts. Very strange looking.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on July 30, 2016

1 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

The MIPS in this helmet is a ripoff. On a non-MIPS helmet, the sweat pads attach to velcro tabs glued to the styrofoam of the helmet. For the 661 version of MIPS, they have attached a 50 cent sheet of thin yellow plastic to the styrofoam, and the sweat pads velcro to the plastic. Because the plastic has cutouts for the vents, the MIPS consists of a few narrow fingers of plastic extending between the vents. So, not even 50 cents worth of plastic--more like 25 cents. Does that justify the $50 increase in price over the non-MIPS version? Will it even work? I guess 661 thought it was a genius idea because they could take the non-MIPS version of the helmet and slap on a thin piece of plastic, and voila the same size helmet will fit you. No need to make a new mold for the MIPS version. Hurray!

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on May 15, 2016

1 5

Just a warning to anyone who is considering replacing their old Bone Arm guards with the current Bone Arm guards. There are no longer three white plastic pieces anymore--the white plastic piece on the upper elbow has been eliminated. The POC website hasn't even updated its description to reflect that change. In addition, the strap that goes around your forearm is no longer a stretchy strap--instead it's a velcro strap, and it's so short I couldn't get it around my skinny forearms (size Large), so I returned my "new" Bone Arm guards.

My old Bone Arm guards, on the other hand, get a five star rating.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on August 13, 2014

1 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: True to size

I'm 6' 3", and I'm finding that the light rain jackets seem to save weight by not making the sleeves long enough. I had the same problem with an XL Marmot Super Mica. The sleeves on the XL Mountain Hardwear Stretch Capacitor Jacket are way too short.

In addition, there is not enough velcro on the cuff to cinch the cuffs snug against my wrists(the XL Marmot Super Mica was good in that regard).



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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on July 25, 2014

2 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: True to size

I just received my XL Marmot Super Mica that I bought for the sale price of $146.22. Unfortunately, the sleeves are too short for me at 6' 3". When I reach for something, the cuffs slide up my arms. As a result, I feel the 'angel wing movement' doesn't work, and the only thing that will keep the cuffs from sliding up my arms is some extra length in the sleeves. A blue XL is being returned.

On the plus side, the cuffs on the Super MIca can be cinched down nicely with the velcro. With most of the Marmot rain jackets I've tried on, the velcro on the cuffs does not offer enough range to cinch them down small enough. For some reason(inattention to details?), Marmot uses different positioning for the velcro on the cuffs from model to model. The Marmot Precip also has cuffs that work for me.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on July 6, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Background: My first pair of knee guards were 661 Kyle Straight knee guards, which were great--so of course 661 discontinued them. When my Kyle Straights wore out, I bought a pair of Rage knee guards, which supposedly had a plastic insert for knee protection, but I could not detect it, so they seemed like they offered less protection than the Kyle Straights. I used the Rage guards until the velcro wore out, and they protected my knees perfectly in several crashes.

To the present: I ordered the soft version of the Rage knee pads shown here, but when I rapped my knuckles on the front of my knee, it hurt a little(unlike my worn out Rage knee guards). So I decided to order the hard shell version for comparison. I performed the same knuckle rapping test on the front of my knee, and the hard shell version offered the protection I was looking for. Does the hard shell version have any drawbacks? I could tell no difference between the two versions by looking at them, nor could I tell any difference in weight when holding them--they both felt really light. While wearing the guards and flexing my knee to simulate pedaling, I could tell no difference between the two versions. As a result, I was left wondering why anyone would order the soft shell version. I returned the soft shell version.

I've been on three rides with the Rage guards, and I haven't noticed that I am giving anything up in the pedaling department, so unless you can't afford $10 more for the hard shell version, I see no reason to buy the soft shell version.

I can't give these guards 5 stars (yet)because the velcro wore out on my last pair of Rage knee guards, and the guards still had plenty of life left in them. I haven't experienced any crashes yet while wearing my new Rage hard shell guards, so the 4 stars is based on my previous pair of Rage knee guards.

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xmtbx

xmtbxwrote a review of on March 28, 2014

2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bought a pair of XL 661 Rage knee pads at the same time I bought a pair of L/XL Fox Launch Pro knee pads, and I alternate between them on my daily mtb rides (6 days/week). I ride 1.5-3.5 hours per day. I wash the pads every 4 days in a front loading machine on delicate.

First of all, I think the Rage knee pads are poor imitations for the 661 Kyle Straight knee pads. Supposedly, the Rage knee pads also have a hard plastic cup covering the knee, but I cannot detect it, so it can't be that hard. In contrast, the Fox Launch Pros have beefy knee protection, so my initial impression was good.

Both knee pads fit snug, but the Rage knee pads stretched out, so I had to tighten the velcro straps more and more.

After 5 months of use, I had four low speed crashes while wearing the Fox Launch Pros, and during the last two crashes the left pad slid off my knee, and I ended up scraping my knee cap pretty good both times (AZ desert trails).

For comparison, while wearing the Rage knee pads I had one high speed crash and a couple of low speed crashes, and I walked away with no damage.

Sometimes while wearing the Fox Launch Pros I got chaffing on the back of my knee from the neoprene(?). On one long ride the chaffing was bad enough that I couldn't wear the Fox Launch Pros again until the sore healed(~ 1 week).

The quality of the materials used in the Fox Launch Pros is much better than the Rage kneepads. The velcro on the Rage knee pads has almost completely worn out making it hard to keep the straps sticking. The Fox Launch Pros look and work as they did when new (except for the Fox logos which washed off the first time I washed them).

However, based on my crash results I can't recommend the Fox Launch Pro knee pads.

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