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Peter N

Peter N

Employee

Salt Lake City

Peter N's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Biking
Running

Peter N's Bio

Spent most of my life on the east coast, came out here to work for Competitive Cyclist and ride some of the best climbs and trails in the world.

Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on October 23, 2017

5 5

https://pelotonmagazine.com/gear/best-pinarello-dogma-yet/

"The bike has every ounce of the F8’s blistering response to power, the same beautiful, aggressive geometry balanced perfectly by the bike’s lateral stiffness, yet feels more composed on the edge, less ragged than the F8, more forgiving and enabling of pushing limits. In this era of Asian manufacturing, aerodynamics and test-bench metrics, the Pinarello Dogma F10 proves to us there is still magic to be found. Other manufacturers may know the right equations to put on the white board, the right suppliers and manufacturers to make a great bike, but Pinarello has made a magical bike. It checks the objective boxes, but does the subjective phenomenally well, instilling metrics with a ride quality that can’t be found on a test bench or in the wind tunnel. It’s a ride quality we can only imagine has been found thanks to Pinarello’s 75-year history."

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on October 19, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Shimano has dabbled in road disc for a while, but always at lower levels (RS-505, RS785, etc...) than their haloed Dura Ace level. They took their sweet time coming to market, several years after SRAM first launched their HRD groupsets. While late to the party, Shimano has really come in strong with a groupset fitting of their pinnacle road product. Whereas other road hydraulic hoods (including their non-series R785) look unsightly and feel ungainly, its the 9170 levers are so sleek that its difficult to tell that they house hydraulic master cylinders. The lever blades are (from what I can tell) a carry over from 9150 series Di2 rim brake, but are reshaped from the previous gen to fit your pointer and middle fingers just perfectly when in the drops. The Di2 shifting is unremarkable in that even from previous generations it shifted perfectly, every single time and even under load. FWIW, I unscientifically feel that Di2 shifting in its standard factory setting feels faster through the gears than Etap HRD does.

Finally, the braking: I'll be the first to admit i've been pretty curmudgeonly about the whole road disc movement... I consider myself a fairly capable descender and have never melted carbon rims or anything of that sort. Disc brakes will inevitably be heavier, so what gives, right? In a word, performance.

I really shocked at how much better of a descender i was on disc brakes. Whereas on a rim brake bike with carbon wheels I'd have to start braking pretty early and hold firm pressure throughout the corner to scrub speed, i found myself testing how late i could hold speed and brake going into corners due to the far superior braking power. Just as important as the actual braking power was the confidence in which I knew that it was there. Everyone has experienced that feeling while riding carbon rims that you're just not quite sure if you're going to get the braking you need. I know for a fact that you'll be a faster descender on this one than your current rim brake bike. I was one of probably 20 or so riders in the Pinarello Gran Fondo who had the privilege of previewing the F10 Disk early, and found myself flying past other F10 rim riders while descending. This day happened to be perfect weather, but in wet weather the advantage of disc brakes is so much more pronounced.

Make the switch to disc. Unlike previously, you won't be making any compromises.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on October 19, 2017

5 5

I had previously spent a lot of time on a Dogma F8 (rim brake), which was hands down one of the best bikes I've ever ridden. The bike was plenty stiff when i stood up to stomp on the pedals, yet surprisingly compliant and smooth over rough surfaces compared to other race-caliber bikes. The most distinguishing feature of the F8 was the way it cornered during high-speed, technical descents. Whereas some other race bikes are *too stiff* that the fork would start chattering during hard cornering, the F8 stayed completely planted. Not that I ever would, but I felt like i could take my hands off the bars at 40 mph due to its stability.

Fast forward to the F10 Disk... I was able to really put this bike to the test equipped with Shimano Dura Ace 9170 Di2 at the Gran Fondo Pinarello in Treviso, Italy, which featured about 9000 feet of elevation (and subsequent descent). The F10 Disk took all the things I loved about the F8 and got disc brakes.

I'll be the first to admit i've been pretty curmudgeonly about the whole road disc movement... I consider myself a fairly capable descender and have never melted carbon rims or anything of that sort. Disc brakes will inevitably be heavier, so what gives, right? In a word, performance.

I really shocked at how much better of a descender i was on disc brakes. Whereas on a rim brake bike with carbon wheels I'd have to start braking pretty early and hold firm pressure throughout the corner to scrub speed, i found myself testing how late i could hold speed and brake going into corners due to the far superior braking power. Just as important as the actual braking power was the confidence in which I knew that it was there. Everyone has experienced that feeling while riding carbon rims that you're just not quite sure if you're going to get the braking you need. While i can't make any claims about how much faster you'll be on this bike than any other bike, I know for a fact that you'll be a faster descender on this one than your current rim brake bike. I was one of probably 20 or so riders in the Gran Fondo who had the privilege of previewing the F10 Disk early, and found myself flying past other F10 rim riders while descending. If you were waiting for a good reason to make the switch, thru axle standards have stabilized for the time being with 12x100 front and 12x142 rear so that you have the freedom to run pretty much any set of road disc wheels you choose.

Inevitably, any conversation about a Pinarello would likely come back to its seemingly exorbitant pricetag... Crazy, I know. But this bike is legitimately a pleasure to ride. I dont think I'm exaggerating when i say that this bike will make you ride more because its that much fun. If you're looking for one of the best road disc bikes on the market, you've found a very worthy candidate above.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on October 9, 2017

5 5

"Make no mistake: the RIP will get you out of trouble should you get yourself into it, and riders who choose aggression over finesse will appreciate its endless appetite for hard hits. But it has the attitude of a long-legged trail bike that keeps an enduro bike hidden up its sleeve in case you need it."

http://www.bikemag.com/gear/review-niner-rip-9-rdo/

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 28, 2017

5 5

"The thing about the new GX Eagle drivetrain is that it just works. The shifting out back is smooth, and chain retention up front is impeccable. There are some differences in ergonomics between the GX shifter and SRAM’s more expensive options, but it’s the sort of you-wouldn’t-know-till-you-tried-it thing. The cassette is an incredible piece of engineering, and particularly when it comes in at nearly a third of the price of the XX1 cassette."

http://singletrackworld.com/2017/06/review-sram-gx-1x12-drivetrain/

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 28, 2017

5 5

"The thing about the new GX Eagle drivetrain is that it just works. The shifting out back is smooth, and chain retention up front is impeccable. There are some differences in ergonomics between the GX shifter and SRAM’s more expensive options, but it’s the sort of you-wouldn’t-know-till-you-tried-it thing. The cassette is an incredible piece of engineering, and particularly when it comes in at nearly a third of the price of the XX1 cassette."

http://singletrackworld.com/2017/06/review-sram-gx-1x12-drivetrain/

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 27, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Mavic's 40 elite wheelset sits a bit below some of their other wheels such as the Cosmic Pro Carbon SL in terms of tech, but you still get a lot of wheel for the dollar here. The weight listed above is misleading as the entire wheels, tires and tubes probably weighs in at the 2090 grams but the wheels themselves should come in around 1545.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 11, 2017

5 5

The short of it is that Enve wheels deserve their hallowed reputation. They change your ride as much as they change the aesthetics of your bike. They are absolutely bomb proof left, right, and sideways, and the difference they make in trail speed is plainly evident. They require an active, aggressive pilot to match the belligerent style of riding they inspire, and don’t like to bother with the lazy or timid.

https://www.tetongravity.com/story/bike/teton-tested-enves-ballerific-super-stiff-m60hv-wheelset

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 7, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The Koryak doesnt look super impressive on paper... Its weight is middle of the pack, it currently is only offered in a 120mm travel, it doesnt have a sweet kashima coat to match the bling of your bike. That being said, it costs roughly half of some other posts (Reverb, Turbine, Transfer once you factor in the cost of the lever). The real kicker is that PRO offers a lifetime warranty on this post. If there's another brand out there that is offering this, I am unaware. Another really nice feature is that the lever comes as Shimano I-spec compatible... if you're running any newer gen Shimano brakes you can integrate the lever in for a very clean look. If you are running a different brand brake you can still use the standard clamp that is included in the box. If 120mm worth of travel is good enough for you (being 5 foot 8, i cant even fit a longer travel post into my frame if i wanted to), this is a fantastic option at a great price.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on September 5, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

High quality all around wheels suited for running wider than your normal road tires. Mavic ships these with 28mm's, but you'd be fine running a much wider tire if it suits your riding needs. They are not Mavic's new Road UST standard (hence the closeout pricing), but set up tubeless with minimal effort. To clarify, these come as 12x100 front and 12x142 rear thru axles out of the box. If you need to run 15x100 front, you can purchase the separate end cap here: https://www.competitivecyclist.com/mavic-mavic-axle-adapter-end-caps?skidn=MAV00J2-ROA-S15MM&ti=U2VhcmNoIFJlc3VsdHM6bWF2aWMgYWRhcHRlcjoxOjE6bWF2aWMgYWRhcHRlcg==

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 29, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

For MY18, Shimano has updated their Ultegra wheelset and renamed it RS-500, not to be confused with a previous lower level R500 wheelset which wasnt super nice.

For an every day reliable, reasonably light wheelset at an excellent value, these are it. They are also tubeless ready, which I'd highly recommend trying. I am able to run a Schwalbe Pro One tubeless tire at pressures as low as 80 psi for a buttery smooth ride, and with sealant inside I have had no issues with flats. If you cant swing the money to go to carbon, I'd highly recommend these wheels as one of the better alloy options out there.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 8, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I thought the previous gen 9000 was great, and Shimano somehow improved pretty much everything about it. Hoods are a little more comfy, and the lever blade curves a little bit more on the end to aid one fingered light braking perfectly. The shifting of both the front and rear derailleurs are lighter action, but dont lose any of that firm feeling. No complaints

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 8, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Industry Nine took two things: Reynolds light weight Attack carbon rims, and their awesome hubs, and built them into a wheelset. You get a set that is sub 1300 grams, plenty light enough to go KOM hunting, while getting the fantastic engagement from I9 hubs. For the road side, I9 reduced the number of pawls to reduce drag and increase the degrees of engagement, but it still comes in at a ridiculously low 6 degrees. For perspective, stock DT Swiss 240 hubs come with an 18 degree engagement ratchet ring (though some wheel brands upgrade those hubs straight out of the box). Not really much else you can ask for in a lightweight climbing wheelset at this price.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 8, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've always been a big fan of the previous gen Michelin Pro4, as to me they featured a great blend of ride quality, durability, and puncture protection. They were good enough tires where i could train all day on them and not hesistate to race on them as well. Michelin seems to have upped the ride quality on these tires significantly... they ride much closer to something like a vittoria but also offer great durability and puncture resistance. Currently 1000 miles in with no flats and still going strong in terms of wear.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 8, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If funds are no object, you should get an enve stem. In terms of weight, stiffness, and looks, its the best on the market. For everyone else, the Thomson stem is all you'll ever need. Strong, high quality, lightweight-ish, but only a fraction of the cost. A good stem is one that you dont notice when riding, and thats what Thomson is to me.

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Peter N

Peter Nwrote a review of on August 8, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Most reliable brake on the market. Seems like a few others have had some issues with their brakes, but I can't say the same for mine. I bled mine when i mounted them on my bike 1.5 years ago and havent had to touch them ever since. Shimano brakes tend to have a reputation to be a bit grabby and lacking in modulation compared to some other brakes on the market. I wouldnt really deny that, but will say that i've gotten used to how quickly the brake ramps up.

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