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Nawrocki

Nawrocki

Utah

Nawrocki's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Snowshoeing
Skiing

Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on June 15, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Very nice. Exactly the kind of quality you would expect at this price. Removeable valve cores (I would say, "of course", but that's not always the case). Claimed weight is 1610, came in at 1600 on the nose. Takes centerlock discs, 6 bolt not available. I was told that the Torch hub was loud....not true....they are quieter than my DT Swiss 350 hubs with 18 and with 54 tooth engagement even after new grease. It's a quiet "angry bee" sound. I doubt anyone would find it objectionable. Riding over gravel is louder. If you spin one up in the shop it'll be louder than on the trail. I think once you put on a cassette and disc it dampens the sound down. The engagement is pretty near instantaneous as advertised. I have about a dozen rides on them with 2.6" Nobby Nics and with Rocket Rons. Both come in around 2.6-2.65" on these at 18 psi.
Something to consider when putting a tire on tubeless...The "groove inside the rim is offset. I found that, if you first put the tire on the side that is offset in and then move the bead out board, it gives you a better shot at getting that other side of the tire on by putting the bead in the groove...I'm not even sure that makes sense to me, but when you see the rim I think you'll know what I'm talking about.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on June 15, 2017

New ride for wife
5 5

Familiarity: I gave it as a gift but have feedback to share

1st: Kudos to Brock Price for helping me put together a smokin' build at a fair price, and to the folks that did a great job of putting it together.

My wife is 5'7" about 30" inseam and ended up on a medium frame with a 35mm stem and the fit is absolutely perfect.
The build also came out at 25.58 pounds with flat pedals! It's on 2.6" Rocket Rons mounted to Ibis 735 rims front and back and on this boost frame, those tires easily fit front and back at 2.65". I measured the rear frame clearance at 3.16" as close as I could estimate at the tire and the front has more in the Fox 150 Factory boost fork.
Fantastic ride!

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on June 4, 2017

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have about 1000 miles of riding on these in mostly dry Utah conditions. It's mounted on a Yeti SB5c with Next SL cranks. I had an issue that required taking the crankset off and I found that the bearings on both sides had gotten pretty rough. As a basic BB, they do the job, and they're not expensive. It would probably be a good idea to check them at least once per season, though. If you get better wear, great.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on May 19, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've reviewed this before, as I'm on a 2016 model. Here's an additional bit of info. It says up to 2.4...it'll take a bigger tire than that. I'm running 2.6" Nobby Nics front and back (which, BTW, are 2.5", as is the 2.6" Rocket Ron) and there is plenty of extra room. I was at the SLC warehouse and measured their 2.8" Rekon on a 35 mm rim, and it came in at 2.6" which would also fit, I expect, with a reasonable amount of room. I just measured the frame width at the widest part of the 2.6 NN and it came out to 2.81". My lovely bride of 38 years is about to take delivery on a 2017, and it has even more room. You're not going to get a real 2.8 on there, but 2.6? No problem. I came off of a Pivot 5.7c and it took a little while before I was able to get the most out of the bike and the upsize in wheels to 27.5, but after about 2 months, I started getting some personal bests on timed climbs up in Park City. For those of you familiar, one on Sweeny's/John's (rocky, rooty) and one on Armstrong (smooth). I found that, once used to it, the bike was more nimble on uphill switchbacks even though it has a slightly longer wheelbase (maybe positioning, or something...and that's with a 160 Pike on the front end!). I felt the rocks and roots on the downhills a bit more than on the Pivot, but somehow the bike felt more "planted" and secure, less likely to be knocked off course and though not timed, my son seemed to believe I was faster as well. It's hard to go wrong with this bike!

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on April 29, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have yet to get them out on anything challenging, but here are some measurements which might help in your decision to get them.

Just got a pair of Evo, TL, Pacestar, Snakeskin.
Mounted on 23 mm internal width by 24.0 mm external height rims on a Yeti SB5c with 160 Pike fork.

Bead to bead out of the box was 161.5 mm, 6 3/8". A bit narrow, but they stretch.
One tire weighed in at 770 gms, the other at 780. Claimed weight is 810.

Initially, mounted at 45 psi (the rated max), the total height rim+tire was 80.70 mm. Initial width was 57.62 mm for both tread and carcass.

After sitting overnight at 45 psi, I reduced the pressure to 16-18 psi to remeasure.

Running 18 PSI rear and 16 front. Both tires are 62.48 mm, 2.46" carcass and tread.

They fit inside the rear and front easily on this bike.

I'd call them an honest 2.45" tire on a 23 mm inner width rim. It wouldn't surprise me if they were really close to 2.6" on a 30 mm inner width rim, though.

Update, I'm about to get a wheelset with 35 mm inner rim width. I'll report measurements when I do.

Update: 2.61" on 35mm id rims at 14 psi.





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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on March 23, 2017

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

For those who have used the IR shorty, which has a rubber bead inside the neoprene neck gasket (which seals well), this does not have that rubber bead. In the large, with a 16.5" neck size, this was too large. It will let in water. I may try a medium. It may be that the smaller neck opening will seal better. It's a Semi-dry top. As long as you understand that some water may come in when you roll, you'll be well informed.
Also, understand that the review requires a rating. I haven't used this product.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on February 26, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used the Freedom ever since it came out, in, what 2012 or so? I transitioned to them from the Freeride. There is a bit of an issue with these with snow build up underfoot, particularly if you ski switch. After trying a few remedies, the most successful one I've found is to spray silicone lubricant in the entire area underfoot and allow it to dry. Any basic spray silicone should work, but I've been using "Blaster Industrial strength silicone lubricant with Teflon" that I got at Home Depot. If you are aware of the season we've had this year in Utah - lots of snow with some of the storms dumping wet snow - you can appreciate how annoying the build up can be. Using this spray has solved the problem for me. I just reapply after a few days and it continues to do the job. And it's cheap!

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on November 23, 2016

4 5

They work well, last longer than the resin pads which are also good. A smidge more noise and maybe a bit less modulation, but it's not real noticeable in dry conditions - I haven't used them in very wet conditions, being in Utah. Just to add, they are also compatible with the M8000 XT brakes; in fact, the M8000 XT brakes come with this pad stock. It would be helpful to add that compatibility to the list.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on October 24, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This is for the 27.5x2.25 Racing Ralph, Snakeskin (describes the level of sidewall protection) Pacestar (tread material. This is faster, but less grippy compared to Trailstar) TL (tubeless easy). These seat easily and seal completely with Orange seal. I'd say the 2.25 has about the grip of a Maxxis 2.35 Ikon and rolls much better. Wear is fast, but they roll fast as well. I'd say 300 miles of northern Utah riding is about what you'll get out of them, but you'll be leaving your friends in the dust in the process. On a typical buff Park City climb of about an hour, I'm usually 3 minutes faster on these than a similarly spec'd Nobby Nic or even an Ikon. I wouldn't take them to Moab, though, as the rock would wear them down fast. I run them at about 24 PSI rear on an SB5c with 23 MM internal width rims.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on September 19, 2016

Delivery problems
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

They roll fast and grip well, both front and back. I've enclosed a picture of the Trailstar tread after about 450 miles of riding in northern Utah for reference. These are the 27.5, but I bought some for a 26 as well. The tread wear is pretty good, especially compared to pre-2015 models.
When you order, I'd advise to avoid "Ontrac" delivery. They are not reliable. Use UPS. My package showed delivered....but I have no idea where it might be!
Update on delivery. I have subsequently used Ontrac a number of times and they have improved dramatically.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on September 6, 2016

1 5

Familiarity: I gave it as a gift but have feedback to share

I got these for my wife, a 63 year old 135 pound woman who bikes in northern Utah. Apparently that is too much for these tires in a 26x2.4, as she is beginning to tear knobs off after about 50 miles. The only reason I'm hanging on to them is that, on the good side, they roll with very low resistance and they hold air well, tubeless.

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Nawrockiwrote a review of on March 19, 2016

Review of buying this bike
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This is a review of the process, service and build quality. Kudos to Scott Gartman, the others who helped me out and the person or persons that built up the bike for me. It's a modified build Medium size with a Pike Dual Air 160 and 2.4" Ardents front and back. I'll post the complete details when I've had a chance to "put it through the ringer" and submit a review. I've included a picture of the wheel/tire just because they had the attention to detail to mount each of the 2 tires at exactly the same spot on the wheel. Also, unlike with some wheelset purchases, they put valves on with removeable cores so that replacing the tires is a breeze. These may seem like minor things, but they are indicative of the other aspects of the build quality. I went through a few build options and changed some things in the process and everyone was very patient with me. BTW, with this build, the Ardents on and Time pedals, it tips the scale at 26.04 pounds. With my other tires, Nobby nic 2.35 front and Racing Ralph 2.2 rear, 25.4 pounds.
I picked the "Used it once or twice option" but have very little time on the bike yet, hence no review of the bike itself.

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on February 3, 2016

Pluses and a major minus
2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 9"
Weight: 165 lbs
Size Purchased: Medium

I bought these at the beginning of the season in Utah. I now have 46 days of skiing on them.
First the good. Hyvent works well, they have a nice cut- they look good and they work from -5F to 40F with no base layer, but I'm fairly warm-blooded.
The bad. The additional material that protects against wear on the inside of the lower leg is only behind the vertical seam. The seam is exposed and is very vulnerable to ski edges. I won't get a second season out of them. I expect that they would be fine for snowboarding, though.
Size wise, I wear 34x30 blue jeans that fit loose for comfort. These are mediums, which are advertised 32-34 waist and they fit just like my blue jeans, just a bit loose.

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Nawrockiwrote a question about on January 3, 2015

I've been on 185 JJ's, telemark (NTN), mounted on the recommended boot center point for about 6 years. I think that is pretty close to ski center. The JJ seemed to have symmetrical rocker front and back and the 2.0 sounds as though it has shortened the back rocker relative to the front rocker ... is that correct? 2. Will this change the recommended mounting point moving it back a bit? Also, it sounds as though the running surface length has increased in each ski length relative to the JJ. (My older 185's have about 42"
of running length on the snow.) At 5' 9" and 160 pounds on telemark gear, could I get roughly the same flotation on 175's?

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Nawrocki

Nawrockiwrote a review of on September 21, 2013

Binding pictured is Freeride.
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The binding pictured is the Freeride, not the Freedom. Here's a picture of the Freedom...At the front of the binding, at the pivot point, you can see there's a "Torx" style screw (on each side). I've found that this screw tends to back out. Once I applied some locktite to it, the screw stayed in place very nicely. It has a greater range of motion than the Freeride, both in the tour mode and in the ski mode, so it feels a little more like a classic telemark binding. I love the way it skis, the convenience of step in, and the ability to release - an ability I've used! The way in which it attaches enhances edge control. I have 80 days on 2 pair with no issues. In one season, I broke 2 toe pieces on the Freeride, however, which has a more active feel earlier in its initiation (it takes a bit more forward pressure to "break the bellows", on the Freeride) which takes a while to get used to. There was no "getting used to" the Freedom...it was easy to ski on the first run. If you are inclined to parallel turn, or turn flat footed, like on a run out if you're just too lazy to make every turn a tele turn, for instance, the Freedom has a slight "pitch up" on the toe piece that makes skiing flat footed a bit easier, as well. I have them on a pair of Armada JJs and a pair of Rossi S3s. Also, the ski brake on the Freedom seems easier to bend to fit the width of your wide skis than the Freeride's brakes, which means you may be able to make the brakes work on a wider range of widths.

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