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Max

Max

British Columbia

Max's Passions

Skiing
Biking
Snowshoeing
Hiking & Camping
Running
Paddling

Max

Maxwrote a review of on February 28, 2019

To the moon and back
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Let me preface this review by stating that I was hesitant to purchase touring boots by Scott, a company I associated with exclusively downhill skiing before now. Then the boot fitter told me that Scott actually purchased Garmont and kept their boot engineers and production platform, and the result was the Cosmos III. What I first noticed was the simplicity in the design; no crazy bells and whistles or moving parts means less likelihood of things breaking in the backcountry, which for me is a huge asset. However I bought these over more widely-known touring boots (like Scarpa, etc) purely for fit. The wider last makes these super comfortable, and with a custom liner immediately fit my foot like a well used glove. Gone are the days of sore feet after 15 minutes on the skintrack. In are the days of hours of touring without any pain or hotspots. While I can't promise the same since all individuals are different, if you have a wider forefoot like me, these boots will do you well. I encourage you to try them on in a store before you by, just like any boots.

Until last week I had only done a number of small side-country and easy backcountry days, and didn't feel comfortable writing a review until I tested them on some real terrain. After a trip to Japan and a summit of a very firm and technical Mt. Yotei, I can confirm that these boots kick ass. Not only were they great on the gradual approach and later steep sections of skinning, but they also did amazing bootpacking the last 700 vertical meters and ripping turns in the volcanic crater.

What really did it for me though was the descent back down the side of Yotei. Imagine a 300 m field of a mixture of wind-drifted pow, sastrugi, and ice. These boots felt stable, comfortable, and were able to drive my ski perfectly down some extremely technical terrain. The same was not seen for my compatriot (probably because he wasn't wearing these boots), who took a gnarly fall and was forced to walk out. Overall I spent 13 and a bit hours in these boots skinning up and then skiing my buddy down, without any blisters or hotspots at all. The same could never have been said for my previous boots.

All in all, these are fantastic boots that will work well overall for those with a wider forefoot, both on the skintrack, bootpack, or descent. Cosmos is a fitting name, since they will take you to the moon and back and you'll love them the whole way.

Photo is me hiking up the side of Yotei!

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on May 8, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 165 lbs
Size Purchased: Medium

I heard that Patagonia was going to release this jacket, but as a college student I don't have a lot of disposable income to blow on outdoor gear. So naturally, I sent the link to my dad who is the biggest gearhound I know, and thought nothing more of it. I got a Snapchat from him at a store with the jacket on and a simple caption of "holy sh*t". So the next day, I went and bought one.
I didn't take the thing off for like 10 days. I slept in it. I ate in it. I biked to campus in it. This thing can do it all. And inevitably, when those BC spring drizzles came through, I kept wearing it. Simply, this jacket does it all. It's breathable, warm, comfortable, and water repellent enough that you don't need to worry if a light rain comes to pass. This jacket ensures that whatever you're doing, you kick ass doing it. From the trails to the bike (or even horse) saddle, this thing will keep you cozy. And it looks damn good.
I have to commend Patagonia on finally getting their hood right. For the past several years, the hoods on their non-shell jackets have gone through a number of different design iterations, all of them were supposed to serve some purpose but kind of flopped in the all-round. The climbing-oriented hoods didn't work for other activities, and/or it downright just looked dumb. The hood on the R1 Techface has a nice brim, is large but not overly so, and can cinch around the head and neck for when it gets windy. And you don't look like a dork when wearing it (cough cough nano-shell). This jacket has a pretty typical Patagonia trim fit, so you might want to size up if you're trying to layer underneath it.
If you're expecting this jacket to be completely waterproof, it isn't. I wanted to test just how waterproof it was on a medium Vancouver downpour and was soaked through in about 20 minutes. My one gripe with it is the wrist cuffs. There's no wrist strap and the sleeves are a little long (or I just have T-Rex arms), so inevitably the sleeves tend to slide down over my hands. Having a way to secure it would be nice, but it's definitely not a deal breaker.

TL;DR: this jacket is the ultimate spring companion that will keep you cozy from the skin-track to the concrete, all while making sure you look good. Be warned: you might get a visit from Bruce Lee because you'll be kicking too much ass while wearing it. Bruce Lee doesn't like competition.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on August 9, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

First off let me say I bought this pack to do some week-long trips, as my 45 liter just wasn't going to cut it. This thing has now replaced the 45 liter completely, even for single night trips.

This thing can CARRY. You'll never have to worry about ditching something to save room or weight again, because this thing will carry it and make it feel like you don't even have anything on your back. Okay, that might be a bit excessive, but the pack does fit very comfortably and holds weight well. I think my favorite thing about this pack is that it isn't too tall like a lot of other packs. This one really keeps the weight around my torso and doesn't make me feel too top heavy. That being said, if you do need to add something last minute (like a bear canister on my latest trip to Wind River. Long story), the lid can raise up to provide more space between the cinch-cord and the top of the pack and make things a little taller.

Now there are a couple of cons to this pack:
-As has been said before, the side map pockets are oddly shaped. Unless you have a very skinny topo map, you may need to find somewhere else to put it. It does do a nice job of carrying things like knives, axes, trowels, and other objects that are long and skinny. I put my headlamp and other gear that needs to be pretty accessible in these as well.
-It's also been said that the hip belt pockets are pretty useless. They are perfectly sized for a Clif bar, and that's pretty much it.
-There aren't a lot of external tie-down spots, like are common on Osprey and other packs. There are two loops perfect for carabiners on either side and bungees for trekking poles, but not a lot of other options. Then again, anything you need to put on the outside will most likely fit in the pack anyway.
-Because the pack is a little wider than most, it kind of makes you look like a turtle when it's actually on your back. Honestly, that's not much of a con because turtles are dope.

The list of pros is too long to put here, honestly. Overall, this is a reliable, burly, comfortable pack that has serviced week-long trips to Zion and Wind River as well as numerous other smaller trips through the Colorado rockies. As with all packs, I highly recommend you try this one on in person before you commit to buying it. Just as a tip the 65 and 75 liter versions of the Baltoro have the same fit, so don't worry if you can't find the one you want in store.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on May 24, 2016

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: Runs small
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 145 lbs
Size Purchased: 30

I ordered these online thinking they would fit roughly the same as the other pairs of Marmot shorts and pants I own. News flash: they don't. When they arrived I excitedly pulled them out of the packaging and tried them on. Much to my dismay, they were not a size 30 like I had ordered. I thought that maybe I had just gotten a little wider; not the case. Compared to other pairs of Marmot shorts I own, these definitely feel like a size, maybe two sizes too small in the waist. And forget the 9 inch inseam. These are maybe 8 inches down the thigh. They are just a little too tight around the waist to be comfortable and fit very slim in the thigh and seat. I wore them a couple of times around the house and to do some light work in the yard, hoping maybe they would stretch out a little. Unfortunately it doesn't seem like it will happen, so I think I will pass them on to a family member. Definitely size up if you decide to get these.

The only reason I did not give these things a horrible review is that other than the fit, these things are pretty nice. They seem like they would be comfortable and very durable, but it really is hard to tell considering the fit and the fact that I've only wore them a couple of times.

Not really what I was expecting from Marmot. I like them as a company and it seems like the quality that I've known from them previously, but not the fit. Hopefully they make some changes, because these could be great shorts.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on May 24, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I bought these on a whim after seeing Xavier De Le Rue rock these shades in one of his snowboarding films. I kind of figured "if they're good enough for a guy that straightlines icefalls, they're probably gonna be good enough for me."

Saying they're good is an understatement. While these are sort of the bottom of the food chain in terms of the variety of Clark models that Smith offers, meaning it doesn't have polarized or ChromaPop lenses, they handle things extremely well. I've taken these things from the rain of the Pacific Northwest, to sunshine on the San Juans, all the way back home to the snowy Rocky Mountains of Colorado, and everything in between. Hiking, biking, kayaking, skiing, and road-tripping have all been successfully completed with perfect vision thanks to these.

While they're not the lightest sunglasses on the planet, I've found that they are comfortable for long periods of time and don't seem to cause headaches or pressure points like sunglasses of similar weight unless you wear them for like 5 hours at a time. They fit great; big enough to give good coverage, but not too big as to make them look ridiculous. I have a pretty slim face and an oddly-shaped noggin and these fit perfect. I have also lent them out to friends and family and they seem to adapt pretty well to various face sizes. They also have great slip-resistant rubber nose pads. I have never once had these come off my face, even when sweating like a pig.

Speaking of looks, I have had numerous compliments on them. I went with the flecked green tortoise color scheme, hoping that they would not look like camouflage in real life. Much to my satisfaction they do not. Overall these are stylish, functional, and - most importantly- durable shades that provide great visual clarity and can adapt to changing conditions. I love these because they can be worn in town or on the trail without any complaints. Perfect all around shades.

One more plus is that Smith has started to use eco-based plastics in the frames, making them a little bit more environmentally conscious. If you're a granola like me, these will keep you in sound mind and protect your eyes in the meantime.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on December 22, 2015

2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

First off let me just say that I have had nothing but good experiences from K2 in the past, and I thought that this would be another quality product.

And it is... kind of. The helmet has some great features. The venting system is unparalleled for those with hot noggins, the Boa lace secures like none other, and this thing comes with more bells and whistles than a bell and whistle.

I don't know what K2 designed this helmet for, but it's definitely not skiing. This thing is compatible with absolutely zero goggle systems. I tried my current goggles, my old goggles, my friends goggles, a lifties' goggles... literally all of them fit funky and ended up being uncomfortable after about half an hour. It works great with sunglasses... but that's not what anyone except for old school teles and Texans wear when they're going down hill. It is designed mainly in mind for touring, which is why I think it fits sunglasses best. But I've never met anyone who wears their helmet while they're skinning unless it's next to some pretty gnarly terrain. Frankly, this helmet is pretty useless for downhill.

My other problem is that this thing is way too fragile. I managed to take a tomahawk or two down a couloir at Whistler and snagged something underneath the snow on a rotation. I was glad to have a helmet on for sure- but the outer shell dented like a Toyota in a hail storm. Seriously, I've put 5 hardcore days in this season (plus some others) and the helmet is already pretty damaged. Pretty much all of my helmets I've had in the past have held up way longer than that. Now I'm trying to figure out if the thing is going to break if I take a hit to the same spot, and if the inner foam is still good.

I'm sure somebody can find a use for this thing judging by the high star reviews on here. Honestly though, save yourself some dollars and go buy a Smith helmet if you plan on wearing any kind of goggles, even if it's just for a descent. Not super impressed with K2 on this one.
(For those wondering, the goggle models I tested with this helmet are Smith IO7's, Zeal Voyager's, Anon Hawkeye's, and Oakley A-Frames. Of those, the Zeal's worked the best but still fit strange)

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on December 7, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I recently moved to Vancouver and wanted to fit in more with the urban look, but didn't want to sacrifice the outdoorsy style pants that I use so much when I go back to Colorado for the summer. These things are the perfect bridge in between. They look really good, not too baggy, but also not too tight. They can be rocked in the city, or out at the closest ski resort.

There are a couple of features that make these different from regular jeans. The first is the climbing gusset mentioned above, which basically just adds another seam around the knee so it is easier to step up (a really nice feature if you need to do anything active). The second is a cinch around the cuff, which actually comes in handy more than you think, especially if you want to keep the bottoms of the pants from getting dirty (i.e if you were walking in a rainy place like, say, Vancouver). Then there are some weird zippered pockets. There is one upper-thigh level on the outside seam. It's a little small and an odd shape, so I'm not really sure what it's supposed to be used for. Maybe a smaller wallet? Then there is another zippered butt pocket, which I'm familiar with from some of Prana's other pants. Honestly, it's not super functional but it's not a deal breaker.

Other than that these are pretty straight forward. The front pockets are deeper than most jeans and are also mesh so they double as vents. The material is very soft and comfortable, but they also do pretty well in temperature fluctuation as well. These are perfect for the outdoorsy individual that finds himself in the city from time to time.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on June 2, 2015

Perfect Accentuation
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 140 lbs

Thank you to Backcountry.com and Arcade for hand-selecting me to review this piece of gear for the benefit of the backcountry.com community.

Disclaimer: if you are a fan of uncomfortable and bulky belts, you will not enjoy this product. Arcade has done an amazing job creating a sleek, immensely comfortable belt that can be worn in any situation. The key lies in the material that stretches and moves with you. I put on this belt and after a while totally forgot I was wearing one. The fit is really one size fits all, as I lent it to a friend who had no problems adjusting it for his waist. This thing is perfect for any person that leads an active lifestyle, whether at work or out on a trail.

Speaking of adjustment, there are a couple of things that I found that are key to not having problems. The first would be to adjust the belt BEFORE you actually put it through the belt loops. Once the belt is actually on you, it is really difficult to adjust it, so it is better to put it on over your pants and then take it off and tighten or loosen it. This is mainly because the adjustment tab sits underneath the main belt part (a nice touch so that it doesn?t stick out and flap around). If this is confusing, check out the picture and take a look.

The other trick to enjoying this belt more is to thread the receiving part of the buckle (or the female part as I think it is technically called) through your belt loops. Because the belt is has the buckle on both ends, it is a little bit harder to lace it through loops. Trying to get the male (point end) through belt loops turns out to be a bit of a puzzle, so it is much easier to just do it the opposite way. One piece of feedback I have for Arcade would be to get smaller buckles so that either end of the belt can be fed through the pants. Alas, this is not a deal breaker and certainly shouldn?t discourage you from buying the belt.

As I said earlier, this truly is an active belt. While at first I didn?t feel like the belt was as secure as a traditional buckle, I was quickly proven wrong. Whether it?s biking, hiking, or simply doing yardwork, this thing will keep your pants on tight and won?t get in the way. The fabric really stretches as you move, so much so that I didn?t even notice it while shifting positions on my bike or stepping over rocks on the trail. Not to mention the stylish pattern certainly is an eye-catcher, and can add personal accentuation to any outfit. The compliments I have gotten about this particular piece of equipment are endless.

Finally it seems that someone has created a belt that blends active functionality with urban style. I applaud Arcade on creating a great product that seems like it will have some great longevity and use on and off the trail.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on April 23, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: Runs small

I got these shoes because I thought they looked spiffy, and for no other reason. I am not a climber and therefore have no use for approach shoes. And to be completely honest with you, from what I have seen of approach shoes, these don't seem like they would be good for that. I would go for maybe a mild hike in these, but that's about it. These are still some quality shoes, and they look WAY better in person. The complements are endless. They are the perfect kick- around shoe. They can be worn with or without socks, are made of sturdy canvas (or something similar) and have a good grippy sole in case things get slippery. These things are great for most everything. I played pickup indoor soccer and even lifted weights in them when I forgot my gym shoes. So while they may not be good for approach, they do everything else pretty damn well. I will warn, they do run tight. I wear a size 9 in most other brands and have a good amount of wiggle room, but these fit close to too tight at first. From what I hear, this is pretty commonplace for North Face footwear. If you have a wide foot, I would go for something else. Otherwise they do pack out a little once broken in. I would still order a half size up to be safe.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on April 23, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: Runs large
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 140 lbs
Size Purchased: Small

I just bought these during Trew's last sale and had a late season dump to test them out in. I can honestly say that these are some seriously impressive pants.



To start out, Trew thought of EVERYTHING when designing these. The kangaroo pouch at the top of the bib is perfectly sized for a beacon and some snacks. The zippered media pocket is perfect if you want to listen to some tunes while blasting through pow Sean Pettit style. It has a pretty big fly zip for those backcountry bio-breaks, and two big zippers on the side to allow for easy access inside the bib, or for venting.


You could drop snow bombs on these, and still nothing would get in. The material Trew is famous for (not Gore-tex, like every other outdoor manufacturer) is impressive. Depending on which style of Gore-tex you're using currently, the 3L used in the Trewth will show them up guaranteed in terms of weatherproofing and breathability (if you can even claim that with a shell).


In true form, Trew added some features that are underrated. A lot of people get turned off from bibs because of the actual bibs. They can be hard to adjust and uncomfortable. Trew's updated straps are super easy to secure, and you'll hardly notice them when skiing. The other feature comes from the scuff guards. Most brands (including my current Patagonia pants) have just another layer of fabric (although abrasion resistant) sewn on to the outside of the shell. Trew's scuff guards are made of SuperFabric, which basically sews armor onto the outside of your pants. To make it even better, they added a layer onto the inside of the end of the pants to protect against things like boots, rocks, and sharp ski blades.


I've only used these once, but I can say that they are some of the best ski pants I've gotten, and it's great quality from a smaller company. The Trew guys really have done their research on how to create amazing goods. They also figured out how to blend style and function (we have steeze already-- stunction?). This does cause their garments to be a little bit baggier for those that are used to the Arc'teryx or Patagonia fit. I run in between on a small and medium in both former brands, and chanced with the smalls on these. They are a little wide (or maybe I'm really skinny), which should provide ample room for layers and puffy down vests.


Do yourself a favor and buy these things.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on April 23, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

Let me just start off by saying that these are typical Patagonia quality. They are perfect in the backcountry or in town, and are nice and cool when the days get warmer so your chestnuts won't be roasting on an open fire. I've owned both old and new pairs and can say that they have/will last FOREVER.

That being said, there are a couple of design differences that have been so feverishly outlined on the Patagonia web page. Patagonia did favor a seam up the back (right on the crack) on the new version, rather than the old ones which had two seams off to the side. Maybe people are ordering sizes that are too small, but I can honestly say I have never had a problem with the seam in the back. Maybe when bending over to reach for something, but usually I do more of a squat anyway so it really doesn't affect me. Regardless, be warned that individual experience may vary with these.

The other thing I noticed was that Patagonia switched the material-slightly. Anybody buying these without ever having owned a pair before will be dumbfounded with how comfortable they are. Those of us who had the old style will notice that the new ones feel ever-so-slightly more synthetic than the old ones. This is really not a deal breaker though.

Overall, these are super comfortable and super functional, whether you're grabbing grub in town or ripping it down the hill on your ski bike. Definitely put these at the front of your underwear drawer.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on February 25, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 145 lbs
Size Purchased: Small

This is a perfect jacket for anyone spending time between the resort and the backcountry. I got the whole untracked jacket and pants combo, and I will say it is some of the best gear I have ever used. I had a tough time choosing between the small and medium. I went with a small eventually because the powder skirt fit a little bit better and it is still good for layering (though, no huge puffy down vests). Be warned too, that this jacket does run a little longer than most of Patagonia's stuff. It's not like a dress or anything, but maybe a couple inches that gives it more of a free-ride feel rather than a back-country, skin tight build.

I am an avid area skier, but also dabble in the backcountry with an AT setup. Either way, I am usually wearing a pack, and Patagonia did an awesome job designing the chest pocket that can be accessed with a pack on. With pretty gigantic pit zips, it is easy to cool down while hitting the bumps or skinning up for another lap.

However, one thing I would like to see is a slightly bigger hood that fits over a ski helmet a little better. It's possible to get it over the helmet, but the movement is incredibly restricted, unlike the Arc'teryx jacket I also own. It's possible that Patagonia fixed this, since my model is a couple years old.

Like most jackets, after a while wear and tear does start to show. The velcro on the cuff of the sleeve started to peel off from the jacket. Patagonia is one of my favorite gear companies because of their policy with repairs. Not only did they fix the sleeve for free, but they did an ample job trying to prevent the same thing from happening again on either side of the jacket.

This is very much a shell even with the polyester lining (a nice touch, if you're wearing it around town). If you're looking for an insulated jacket, maybe try the Primo from Patagonia.

One other thing about this jacket, it will snap heads. Particularly with the vibrant purple that I currently rock. Either way, you are sure to get compliments because it is just a good looking jacket. If you enjoy ladies skiing by saying things like "nice Patagucci," you will love this jacket. Either way, you really can't go wrong.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on February 25, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

As a ski patroller, I get a crap ton of use out of my gloves. I am used to buying pairs of $10 insulated leather gloves from my local Cabelas and waterproofing them with Snoseal. Those were simply not warm enough to handle a cold snap that we had for a few days around Christmas, so I needed something warmer quick. I found these at a local shop for a decent price, and I've always trusted Marmot so I went with them. They were a little stiff at first, but leather is always like that. I broke them in within a couple hours of doing rope work and hand curls. And boy did they keep my hands toasty. To the point that I was sweating in them doing ropes. Most people shouldn't be using their hands THAT much, so just skiing around with them they were perfect. It was going great until about a week ago. On a heli trip to BC the seam on the side of the index finger split about 2 or 3 centimeters wide. Luckily the gear manager at the lodge had a good fix (some kind of glue heated with a blow torch? Doesn't matter), but I was still surprised that I only got about 2 months out of the glove. Usually my $10 dollar pairs last longer than that.

It's hard to tell from the picture, but on the edges of the glove there is a stitched seam. On most pairs of gloves, the stitch is folded into the inside part of the glove. For some reason, Marmot decided to keep the stitch on the outside. I think that everyday wear and tear and the vulnerable external seam causes the stitching to become undone rather quickly. Marmot should really put the stitching inside for the next generation of these gloves.

That being said, I say again that these are incredibly warm. Not only that, but they are pretty stylish too. And I will say that the added strips of leather across the palm and on the index finger are great, it allows you to do tough work without having to worry about destroying the leather in the palm. Unfortunately Marmot did not take this care for longevity when thinking about the seam because they could've made for a fantastic glove.

Bottom line: For anyone looking for a stylish, warm, and comfortable glove (maybe for shoveling off the car or getting the paper in the mornings?) and don't put a whole lot of work into gloves, this is perfect glove. For others, I would try the original Kinco gloves (which will last forever with proper care) or Flylow's version for a slightly cheaper, less warm option, or maybe a Black Diamond Guide glove or some denomination of Hestra for a pricier option.

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Max

Maxwrote a review of on December 30, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I found these in a small, local outdoor gear store in Breckenridge (which is where the company is based). I was immediately drawn to the color of the shoe, which was very stylish. I was a little uncertain in the store when I tried them on, but I decided to buy them anyway. At first, I didn't think they were very comfortable, but Forsake has done an awesome job with an adaptive footbed in the sense that it really molds to your foot. But be warned - it takes a couple days. They are definitely stylish and comfortable, but I wouldn't recommend them for much more than kicking around town or a low-intensity hike. In a pinch, they will work fine as a hiking or even mountain biking shoe, but I find that they better suit in an apres sense. Perfect to throw on after you take your hiking boots, ski boots, or bike shoes off, especially if you plan on spending some time wandering around the nearest ski town. They're not waterproof like some of Forsake's other models, but they do have a high rubber outsole on the toe which makes them good for trekking around in dirt and thin layers of snow. Like one of the company's slogans, these shoes are perfect to take "from the gnar, to the bar."
Something that I feel are under-appreciated with a shoe are the laces. Forsake kept the laces from a hiking boot, which is fantastic. Super easy to lace up and down, and they are durable, high quality.
My one complaint is that the blue fabric around the foot opening has started to wear down, especially because I sometimes keep them tied when I slip them on. I don't really mind, especially because it gives it a sort of gritty, outdoor look, but those who like perfect kicks should avoid putting the shoes on while still tied.
Overall, these shoes are good quality and stylish, perfect for any outdoor adventurer needing something a little bit more comfortable to get home.

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Max

Maxwrote a question about on June 24, 2014

Has anybody used this for mountain biking? I am riding with a straight gore-tex jacket now and it is way too hot for summer. I'm looking for a jacket that can take the punishment of a Colorado thunderstorm decently well, but will still breath well. As many know there is no good balance between breathability and waterproofness, but from trying this on in an outlet store, it seems as good as it will get. Any advice/experiences/suggestions?

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