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Kyle D.

Kyle D.

Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on October 25, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Height: 5' 9"
Weight: 155 lbs

The Cruzer Classics were way too narrow for my slightly wider foot, but these fit like a glove. Unfortunately, like all the Cruzer shoes, these fall apart rather quickly. I got them to last just about a season at Red Rock before the sole delaminated at the toes. At least they are fairly inexpensive. But personally I would pay the extra money for a shoe that would last a few seasons.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on October 25, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 9"
Weight: 155 lbs

I normally wear a size 9.5 - 10.0 in street shoes. I went with a 10.0 and the fit is great.
In my experience with approach shoes there has always been some give and take, but the 5.10 Access Knit seems to tick all the boxes:
Lightweight, comfortable (even for someone with a foot on the slightly wider side), grippy, and I can slip them on and off at the crag without tying/un-tying the laces. I can't speak to their durability yet but they seem like they're going to last. I knocked off one star because the knit material invites in all the sand at Red Rock (I suppose that is the one compromise with this shoe) For comparison, I have owned the 5.10 Guide Tennie (very durable, fit and comfort was decent, but way too heavy), Evolv Cruzer Classic (very lightweight but too narrow, terrible build quality) and Evolv Cruzer Slip-On (very lightweight, very comfortable for a wider foot, still terrible build quality).

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on October 25, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 9"
Weight: 155 lbs
Size Purchased: medium

This review is more of a suggestion to try it on in the store if you can find one. I felt the neck/hood opening to be to small and tight, and the material on the inside was rough against my skin. For the same price, I liked the Arc'teryx Atom AR a lot more.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on February 4, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I got tired of trashing my expensive "outdoor" shoes in the gym, so I picked these up. They were exactly what I was hoping they'd be: comfortable after a short break-in, I can leave these on for an entire gym session, but they still fit and perform well enough. Inexpensive, I think I got these on sale for $80. The rubber is a bit of a double-edged sword in that its really not very sticky when compared to any of the compounds used on the higher-end shoes, but it also seems to be wearing down quite slowly, which is perfect for thrashing around on those shoe-destroyer plastic holds. And with how big footholds are in the gym, you don't really need the stickiest rubber anyway.

For size reference, I wear a 41.5 in the Otaki, and a 41.5 in this shoe. I have a slightly wider forefoot.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on October 16, 2016

Might replace my Miura VS
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: Runs large
Size Purchased: 41.5

I've been a huge fan of the Miura VS the last year or so and just burned through my 2nd pair when the Otaki came out. The technical specs of these shoes looked very similar (same last, same 1.1mm P3 midsole, same 4mm XS edge rubber) so I gave them a try.

Overall they are indeed very similar feeling shoes, with the Otaki's being slightly less asymmetrical and slightly wider in the toe box. What this equates to is a much more comfortable shoe, especially if you have a wider forefoot like me, with maybe a very small loss in power under the big toe, if any at all. Actually, I feel a bit more comfortable using the outside edge of the Otaki than the highly asymmetrical Miura VS which keeps me on the very point of the shoe 99% of the time.

The new "S-Heel" technology is not a gimmick, it really is probably the most solid feeling heel cup of any shoe I've worn, even on a pair of shoes that are probably a half size too large for me (I sized the same as my Miura VS and they seem to run a bit large. But I compared them to the same size Miura VS in the store and they looked identical, so I think La Sportiva sizing may have changed in the Miura VS as well).

I also like not having the 3rd velcro strap that the Miura VS has which hangs up in cracks and pockets and seems to be the first thing to wear out.

The only real issue I had with the Otaki's so far was a "hot spot" on the back of my left heel which gave me a pretty bad blister. I taped that area up for the rest of the break-in period and it is much better now, but this is not an issue I've had with any other shoes before. I'm not sure if its the design of the Otaki or that I just got unlucky with this particular pair.

Oh, one last thing... the Otaki "shoe-farts" more than any shoe I've worn, so if that sort of thing bothers you, look elsewhere haha.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on December 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've had this bag about a year and have probably had it out 50+ times now. I've used it for both sport and trad climbing trips, on approaches ranging from easy 15 minute walks to 1.5 hour hikes. In terms of capacity, it easily holds everything you need for sport climbing including a 70m rope (inside). For trad climbing with a full rack, carrying a rope inside would be a squeeze but it is possible. The rope can be carried outside the pack but I've never tried it. I prefer to carry my rope in a separate bag on my chest and my rack in the Neon Gear 45. In terms of quality, all of the zippers are still working smoothly, the plastic buckles are in tact and there are no tears in the material. The included rope tarp is a little small but totally usable. My only real complaint is about the waist belt. On some of the longer approaches it starts to cut into my sides and becomes a bit uncomfortable. I'd like to see some padding like you see on some of the Osprey packs. Other than that, I love this thing and will most likely be buying another one when it finally wears out.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on December 2, 2015

4 5

Went rock climbing today in northern NM and used these for the hike to the crag and back. Temps were mid 30's. I hiked about 4 miles total, in mud, on ice and in snow as deep as 1 foot. They stayed dry and warm the entire time, were comfortable and the traction was decent. I had to do a little scrambling on the way down and the rubber seemed to stick fairly well on the basalt boulders. I'd still prefer my Five Ten approach shoes in dry conditions, but for mud and snow these performed quite well. I wear a 9.5 street shoe and got these in a 10.5. They're still a little big with my wool socks, a 10 would have sufficed.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on November 26, 2015

4 5

I liked this windbreaker so much I bought 2 of them. One stays in my crag pack and the other in my crash pad. It stuffs into its own pocket and takes up very little space clipped to my harness. I've used it year around except for the summer months in Vegas. Sometimes cutting the wind is all you really need to make the difference between being chilled and being comfortable. I had it out in a pretty heavy downpour and it didn't repel water very well, but I know its not really designed for this. I also ripped the elbow somehow on my second one after just 3 months of owning it. Arcteryx replaced it for $40. Unfortunately they no longer made it in the color I had. I'm 5'9" 150lbs and wear a Small.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on November 26, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bit the bullet and upgraded from my BD harness to this Arcteryx one about 4 months ago. I love how light and comfortable it is. I forget I'm wearing it. I've tried to go back to my BD harness and it feels like I'm wearing a diaper. Ok, maybe a bit of an exaggeration but not much... the Arcteryx harness is that good. It also packs up a lot smaller which is convenient as every little bit of space helps when I've got a full trad rack and 70m rope in my bag. I'd give it 5 stars if the color options were better. Arcteryx could take a lesson from BD on this.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on September 10, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I bought these only because I had forgotten my climbing shoes on a trip in Colorado. I had never climbed in such a stiff and asymmetrical climbing shoe. I really didn't like them at first because they lacked the sensitivity that I was accustomed to in shoes with softer rubber, and they were pretty uncomfortable compared to my other shoes. Fast-forward 6 months and these are now my go-to shoes for technical face climbing. The XS Edge rubber holds firm on the tiniest edges where the softer rubber of my other shoes rolls off. They didn't stretch much but conformed to the shape of my foot after a month or two of heavy climbing and now are actually pretty comfortable for such a downturned and asymmetrical shoe. And the heel cup fits my foot better than any shoe I've tried. They're due for a resole and I love them so much I'm considering buying a 2nd pair while they're getting new rubber. I wear a 9.5-10.0 US street shoe and bought these in a 41.5.

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Kyle D.

Kyle D.wrote a review of on March 25, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I love nearly everything about these shoes:
-They perform surprisingly well for how comfortable they are.
-Just slightly down-turned with a medium-stiff sole creates a great balance between sensitivity and stiffness, which makes them a very versatile shoe.
-Very durable.
-(I know this shouldn't matter but) the best looking climbing shoes out in my opinion.

My only gripe about these shoes is the heel cup. It could just be the shape of my foot but these shoes have the 'baggiest' heel out of the 5 pairs of shoes I own. They fit tight in the toes and tight up around the top edge of the heel (on my achilles) but there is a bunch of extra space in the bottom-back of the heel. So much that my ability to heel-hook in these is nil.

Fortunately, problems/routes which require heel-hooking make up a small percentage of my climbing. But it is a bummer when these shoes are so close to being the one climbing shoe that could do it all for me. The search continues ;)

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