Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50
Joe Draper

Joe Draper

, Gearhead

Salt Lake City, Utah

Joe Draper's Passions

Biking

Joe Draper's Bio

Competitive cyclist, BC Gearhead, and outdoor lover. Live to race XC Mountain, road, and cyclocross. Love to suffer.

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on November 6, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

See if this sounds familiar: you leave the house freezing. The jersey and arm warmers just aren't quite warm enough. You're cold too the core, but you know that you'll be climbing a canyon/doing intervals, and if you bundle up too much, you're going to burn up during your effort, get all sweaty, and freeze on the way home; hence the armwarmer/jersey combo.

Giordana's proposed solution to the aforementioned quandary is their short-sleeve AV100 jacket. Paired with arm warmers, I've worn it down to 40 degrees comfortably, but when the sun rises farther, or the road points up, the ability to loose your lower arm coverage is wonderful. I'd also imagine that it would serve as an excellent base layer under a heavy jacket for a really cold day.

Sizing is consistent with the rest of Giordana's line.

If you have any questions feel free to reach out to me directly at jdraper@backcountry.com!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 30, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Everyone should have some warm bibs, and if you're a Castelli fan with long legs, these would be an excellent option! Personally, I'm not enamored by the chamois, and the cut was a bit too long for my liking. The quality of materials is top notch, and they are warm, but I prefer Assos' Tiburu bibs at the end of the day.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 30, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

For under $200, you're not going to find a jacket with a more premium hand. Castelli nailed it on this one. The description has it dead on; the Transition jacket is perfect for the 45-60 degree range, which encompasses a large portion of the year here in Salt Lake City. The styling is also uber-classy (it looks really nice in person.)

Sizing is Castelli typical, which is to say roughly a size smaller that Pearl and Giordana, and a hair smaller than Assos.

Feel free to reach out to me directly at jdraper@backcountry.com if you have any questions!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 30, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

See if this sounds familiar: you leave the house freezing. The jersey and arm warmers just aren't quite warm enough. You're cold too the core, but you know that you'll be climbing a canyon/doing intervals, and if you bundle up too much, you're going to burn up during your effort, get all sweaty, and freeze on the way home; hence the armwarmer/jersey combo.

Giordana's proposed solution to the aforementioned quandary is their short-sleeve AV100 jacket. Paired with arm warmers, I've worn it down to 40 degrees comfortably, but when the sun rises farther, or the road points up, the ability to loose your lower arm coverage is wonderful. I'd also imagine that it would serve as an excellent base layer under a heavy jacket for a really cold day.

Sizing is consistent with the rest of Giordana's line.

If you have any questions feel free to reach out to me directly at jdraper@backcountry.com!

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 24, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Like Andres, I've ridden Look as long as I can remember. The light action, and larger platform, have won me over! The bearings felt great out of the box, and the weight is very impressive. look for more updates down the road!

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly at jdraper@backcountry.com.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 12, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This represents a huge improvement to the old Aliante saddle. You can tell that Fizik thought things through really carefully with their new line. 'Open' denotes the stiffer of Fizik's two platforms, with the alternative 'vs Evo' featuring a more pliable base. Personally I found that I preferred the Open saddles for mountain biking, since the pedaling platform feels a little better, and you spend a little more time out of the saddle. I currently run a 'vs evo' on my road rig, and I like the extra give you get, since you spend more time in the saddle.

It's impossible to say which saddle is going to suit you until you try, but if you want a well made piece with lots of options, take a look at Fizik's new line!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 12, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

The Niner RLT is sort of like the Subaru Outback of the bike world. Unless your desired form of cycling is on the fringes (think Enduro and TT,) the RLT is going to do it all.

I was shocked at how little compromise I detected when I rode the RLT. The first ride I took it on involved the stretch of dirt road connecting Jeremy Ranch to the East Canyon area. As soon as the bike hit dirt, it felt incredibly stable. Compared to my fairly-twitchy CX bike, the RLT inspired a lot of confidence! Once the dirt gave way to pavement, I was shocked at how road bike-esque the bike felt. I never felt like it was overly sluggish. In fact, I could happily ride it and never leave the pavement.

If you want a bike that's going to do it it all, this might be the ticket for you.

Feel free to reach out to me directly at jdraper@backcountry.com if you have any questions.

Thanks!

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 2, 2018

5 5

I'd take this over an F10.

I use the F10 as an example because it's such a popular choice in the superbike market, and it enjoys it's popularity for a good reason. It's an extremely fast all-arounder with an extremely impressive race pedigree.

It also costs $6000. That's 4 times more than you'll pay for this Helium at closeout pricing, and after riding them back to back, I honestly liked the Helium more.

For starters, the SLX is ridiculously light. Quoted manufacturer weights, it's actually lighter than the F10, Bianchi's Specialissima, Wilier's Zero.7, and it comes within a few grams of the new S-Works Tarmac, and even the Factor O2. Build up with mechanic Red, Reynolds Attacks, and a stock alloy cockpit, a small came in at 13.7 lbs (and at an asking price of $5500 no less.) The handling is well-balanced, the ride quality is right on par with other bikes in it's class, and the stiffness is remarkable for a bike that's so feathery.

Even if it was the same bike as all of the other superbikes mentioned above, the Helium would make my short list, and considering that you can pick up a brand new 2017 frame for $1400, it definitely earns the status of 'the bike I'd actually buy.'

Feel free to shoot me an email at jdraper@backcountry.com if you want to speak about the SLX, or any of the other bikes we sell in more detail!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 2, 2018

5 5

I'd take this over an F10.

I use the F10 as an example because it's such a popular choice in the superbike market, and it enjoys it's popularity for a good reason. It's an extremely fast all-arounder with an extremely impressive race pedigree.

It also costs $6000. That's 4 times more than you'll pay for this Helium at closeout pricing, and after riding them back to back, I honestly liked the Helium more.

For starters, the SLX is ridiculously light. Quoted manufacturer weights, it's actually lighter than the F10, Bianchi's Specialissima, Wilier's Zero.7, and it comes within a few grams of the new S-Works Tarmac, and even the Factor O2. Build up with mechanic Red, Reynolds Attacks, and a stock alloy cockpit, a small came in at 13.7 lbs (and at an asking price of $5500 no less.) The handling is well-balanced, the ride quality is right on par with other bikes in it's class, and the stiffness is remarkable for a bike that's so feathery.

Even if it was the same bike as all of the other superbikes mentioned above, the Helium would make my short list, and considering that you can pick up a brand new 2017 frame for $1400, it definitely earns the status of 'the bike I'd actually buy.'

Feel free to shoot me an email at jdraper@backcountry.com if you want to speak about the SLX, or any of the other bikes we sell in more detail!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 2, 2018

5 5

I'd take this over an F10.

I use the F10 as an example because it's such a popular choice in the superbike market, and it enjoys it's popularity for a good reason. It's an extremely fast all-arounder with an extremely impressive race pedigree.

It also costs $6000. That's 4 times more than you'll pay for this Helium at closeout pricing, and after riding them back to back, I honestly liked the Helium more.

For starters, the SLX is ridiculously light. Quoted manufacturer weights, it's actually lighter than the F10, Bianchi's Specialissima, Wilier's Zero.7, and it comes within a few grams of the new S-Works Tarmac, and even the Factor O2. Build up with mechanic Red, Reynolds Attacks, and a stock alloy cockpit, a small came in at 13.7 lbs (and at an asking price of $5500 no less.) The handling is well-balanced, the ride quality is right on par with other bikes in it's class, and the stiffness is remarkable for a bike that's so feathery.

Even if it was the same bike as all of the other superbikes mentioned above, the Helium would make my short list, and considering that you can pick up a brand new 2017 frame for $1400, it definitely earns the status of 'the bike I'd actually buy.'

Feel free to shoot me an email at jdraper@backcountry.com if you want to speak about the SLX, or any of the other bikes we sell in more detail!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 2, 2018

5 5

I'd take this over an F10.

I use the F10 as an example because it's such a popular choice in the superbike market, and it enjoys it's popularity for a good reason. It's an extremely fast all-arounder with an extremely impressive race pedigree.

It also costs $6000. That's 4 times more than you'll pay for this Helium at closeout pricing, and after riding them back to back, I honestly liked the Helium more.

For starters, the SLX is ridiculously light. Quoted manufacturer weights, it's actually lighter than the F10, Bianchi's Specialissima, Wilier's Zero.7, and it comes within a few grams of the new S-Works Tarmac, and even the Factor O2. Build up with mechanic Red, Reynolds Attacks, and a stock alloy cockpit, a small came in at 13.7 lbs (and at an asking price of $5500 no less.) The handling is well-balanced, the ride quality is right on par with other bikes in it's class, and the stiffness is remarkable for a bike that's so feathery.

Even if it was the same bike as all of the other superbikes mentioned above, the Helium would make my short list, and considering that you can pick up a brand new 2017 frame for $1400, it definitely earns the status of 'the bike I'd actually buy.'

Feel free to shoot me an email at jdraper@backcountry.com if you want to speak about the SLX, or any of the other bikes we sell in more detail!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on October 2, 2018

5 5

I'd take this over an F10.

I use the F10 as an example because it's such a popular choice in the superbike market, and it enjoys it's popularity for a good reason. It's an extremely fast all-arounder with an extremely impressive race pedigree.

It also costs $6000. That's 4 times more than you'll pay for this Helium at closeout pricing, and after riding them back to back, I honestly liked the Helium more.

For starters, the SLX is ridiculously light. Quoted manufacturer weights, it's actually lighter than the F10, Bianchi's Specialissima, Wilier's Zero.7, and it comes within a few grams of the new S-Works Tarmac, and even the Factor O2. Build up with mechanic Red, Reynolds Attacks, and a stock alloy cockpit, a small came in at 13.7 lbs (and at an asking price of $5500 no less.) The handling is well-balanced, the ride quality is right on par with other bikes in it's class, and the stiffness is remarkable for a bike that's so feathery.

Even if it was the same bike as all of the other superbikes mentioned above, the Helium would make my short list, and considering that you can pick up a brand new 2017 frame for $1400, it definitely earns the status of 'the bike I'd actually buy.'

Feel free to shoot me an email at jdraper@backcountry.com if you want to speak about the SLX, or any of the other bikes we sell in more detail!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on September 20, 2018

5 5

Dry sacks are an essential for any backpacker, whether you’re a newbie, or an experienced trekker, and weight matters. This sack is the perfect balance of strength, packability, lightness, and dryness. I had previously stuffed clothes, and other essential items in the bottom of my pack to get smashed, but those days are over.

(1)

 

Joe Draper

Joe Draperwrote a review of on September 20, 2018

5 5

The stove itself weighs nothing, and it’s so packable, that I can store a mini lighter in the little box along with the stove. Not only this, but it’s really powerful. It doesn’t boil water quite as fast as a Jetboil, but it’s still a great (and cheaper)alternative for anyone looking to save a huge chunk of weight for faster longer expeditions!

(0)

 

0 Comments