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jason sager

jason sager

Otown, Utah

jason sager's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking

jason sager's Bio

Escaping from the swamps of Southern Louisiana sometime in the mid 90's, Jason migrated west to Austin, TX, through Durango, CO, on to Park City, UT, way out to PDX before the pull of the Wasatch pulled him back for keeps.

Cold hands plague him. He doesn't eat meat, which goes over really well in Spain. A father of two boys, owner of a few motorcycles, several worn out passports, and way too many shoes and jackets for anything less than a walk in closet.

20 years on the bike and 15 as a professional means he knows a thing or two about what works and what doesn't...and as team manager of the Backcountry.com mountain bike team, he's not only the guy with the clip board, he's also out there pushing the needle into the red just to keep the young guns on their toes.

jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 14, 2016

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 145 lbs
Size Purchased: medium

one thing that isn't noted in the description is this thing is THIN/lightweight. Its not a puff jacket - think of it as the hiking/skiing version of a bike wind jacket - something you stuff in your pocket except when you need it. Not saying that's bad at all - but don't mistake this for a primary insulation layer. Its part of a system, or a single situation "'I'm going to freeze for a bit but overall I'll be hot" kinda need. A bike wind jacket with a hood and international-spy discreet puffy-ness in the middle front. I got the medium and it was loose on my frame....but to go smaller would mean really short sleeves.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on November 24, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 150 lbs
Size Purchased: 11

Errrrybody says these are great shoes, and somehow they are, go figure! Comfortable, supportive, durable, and while they look like a skate shoe they function well enough to actually hike, get them wet, dirty, and still put them back on in the city. Buy'em, you'll like them.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on May 15, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been tweaking clothing for years, trying to make clothes do what I want them to do. One of the most difficult conditions to dress for is when weather has the potential to be hot and cold, dry and wet. For days when its a constant mix of both - but a full jacket (I'm not talking about a wind jacket) is too much (to carry or wear) and to go with clothing not designed for precipitation, then this is your go-to-item.

The material sheds water in any form, its long enough on your arm to keep you warm but short enough to wear when going uphill for long periods. Unzip it for moments when things are getting hot, and zip it up when its cold...and once the roads/trails start to get wet enough to spray, you'll come to truly appreciate the construction of the long tail in the back, which had previously been unnoticed.

Of note - it fits TIGHT. It might be designed to wear over a base layer, but I tend to use it over my short sleeve jersey, treating it more as a jacket than a true jersey. It'll go either way, so just think about how you want to wear it. I consider it more of an amazing jacket with shorter sleeves.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

How do you turn MIPS down?
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Extra protection is better, and POC helmets fit like a glove. What's not to love. An interesting upside...maybe its just the shape of my ears and the head/helmet interface, but the acoustics of the POC helmet are crazy - I can hear things behind me much better than I could with any helmet I've worn in the past. It sort of freaked me out at first, not knowing what was going on - not sure if its a reduction in wind noise on my ears or something to do with the shape of the helmet. I'd be curious to hear from others if they experience the same thing. The straps are some of the lightest and least obtrusive of any helmet.

The helmet scoops A LOT of air, and anything that's in the air.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Seatposts should be "set and forget" and that's exactly what the RF Next post does. It handles standard and the tall carbon rails without any problems, and has a nice give to it even with the 30.9mm size. I love two bolt posts...they make tiny adjustments so easy.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I was "a Fi'zi:k" guy for years, then spent 6 years on another brand of saddle. 2015 brought a reunion for my rear end and Fi'zi:k...and let me tell you, I was a little apprehensive. This fear was unwarranted. Saddle mounted, numbers measured, it was like I never left home. Fear not, change, for the only change we really need worry about is that which comes from within. Switching saddles ain't no thang.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We switched from 31.8 to the 35mm clamp size and nothing has tightened up the front of the bike like this. I never realized there was an innate amount of flex in the old set up (particularly in the stem) until making this switch. Now my XC bike feels like a road bike with an integrated bar/stem combo. Its most apparent when you go back to your old bike. If you use a bike computer mount that clamps the bar near the stem, be warned - it won't work on this setup.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

120mm travel on a 100mm Yeti ASR makes for a heavenly ride. I'll typically add a little oil to the lowers (15w) to help with the sticky Utah dust and this will keep the small bump stiction at a minimum. No one does mid stroke and big hits like Fox, this fork reminds me of riding a KTM!

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

A plug and play wheelset - they come with whatever axle configuration you might need right out of the box, nothing more than a 5mm needed. The Reynolds tape is one of the best I've seen and the rim design makes pumping up tires in the field actually possible. Its the first carbon rim that I've truly been able to mount tires on with a floor pump, dry, on the fly. No burping, wheels are stiff, yet have a nice resonance to them, not a dead feel from wheels that are too stiff. External nipples are nice should you (unlikely as it might be) need to true them. We ride them like we stole them, and they've proven to be very durable, despite multiple rim-outs. I rarely ride more than 20psi and hit rim pretty often on chewed up Spring condition trails. Zero complaints!

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

So braaap
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

When do I go for the Barzo? When the ground is rough, chewy (damp or dry), and I'm looking for a little more bite than the Peyote offers. At the Whiskey 50 off road race in Prescott, AZ, it has a 12 mile dirt road DH, then you go back up that 12 mile (4000') climb. Even on a course like that, we went for a Barzo up front because of how well it handles and how hard you can charge the technical sections. It provides both confidence in handling as well as from rock strikes with the additional height of the tread.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

Open tread works well everywhere
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

A fast rolling tire with a lot of volume, you'd think at first that it would be purely a "fast course" tire, but actually I've found myself using this tire more for trail riding than XC riding. Particularly when the ground has a difficult mix of loose-over-hard-pack. The open spaces on the tire allow the rubble a place to go and the knobs to hook up. Equally pleasing is how well the tire rides on sidewalk smooth trails, regardless of the surface. Its decent when things get wet, just don't call it a mud tire...but who rides in the mud, anyway. Its 2015, not 1996.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

First off, don't take this the wrong way - I just reviewed the SB5 and said its one of the best bikes ever...and it is. But so is this one. Different horses for different courses. My analogy for bikes like the ASR and the SB5 is this: you can have a 500hp Porsche or a 500hp Benz - the same rules of the road apply, which ride do you want? This bike, particularly when built with a Fox 120mm fork, rides smoother and deeper than you'd think a 100mm XC bike would. And even thought I want to go fast, I want to have a good time doing it. Its stiffer than my previous XC bikes, lighter than my previous XC bikes, and more fun. Flipping back and forth between 29'er and 27.5" wheels, the only thing so far that I notice is that, surprisingly, I feel faster on the shorter travel 29" XC bike. And I'm talking through the turns...go figure.

Build quality is stellar, all of the cables go where they should, and it has internal dropper post routing, which really makes this a clean and versatile bike.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on April 30, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've spent a lot of time on a lot of nice bikes, and the SB5 is one of my favorites, hands down. Its light enough to build as an every day bike, no matter where you live, pedals well enough that I've raced XC on it, and the build quality is apparent as soon as you take it out of the box. The hardware is nice, cable routing sensible, and the paint....green. Or is it blue?

Ride - simply put, you don't think about it. To me that says it all. There isn't a feeling of "I'll handle the ride uphill because its worth it on the downhill." The rougher, the better (that's why you want a 140mm bike, right?) and its great when its smooth and twisty. If only it had a water bottle cage....

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 5, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I'll agree, white has a classic look to it, but black looks clean and, quite honestly, much tougher.

These are my favorite undershirts - they come out of the wash practically dry, which speaks well for how quickly they'll move moisture away from your body. Buy them tight, tuck'em in well, and you'll stay both warm, and cool, on your rides. They'll last for years, but keep the tags on them so you can quickly orient which is the front and back. Its easy to put these on backwards.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 5, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

Well, hold on- I'm not calling myself savvy - it did take me 15 years to finally start using these windstopper undershirts - but now that I am using them, if any of you invent a time machine, please let me know so I can go back and slap the younger version of me into picking up one of these sooner.

The key to this shirt is that it lets you wear less. On those iffy days where you can't decide what to wear, or you'll experience a broad range of temps and conditions - one of these undershirts lets you cut an external layer.

Be careful though - they're extremely warm. Unzipping your jersey with a windstopper layer on results in barely being able to feel the difference. I'd say they bring you from needing a winter long sleeve and vest down to the zone of wearing a summer jersey and arm warmers.

Usually I buy undershirts a size down so they're super tight and don't bunch up, but the windstopper material doesn't stretch much, so don't size down or you won't get the shirt on.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 5, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: Runs small

Cold fingers are the bane of my existence in winter. These are my doomsday gloves - they handle the worst of winters (that you belong outside in) and I use them for everything from winter road biking when its below freezing, to snow biking to snow boarding. Buy them a little big so your fingers don't push against the ends when you're on a road bike. Dexterity isn't as good as you'd get with one of Gore's smaller gloves, but then...those smaller gloves aren't as warm, either. Pick your poison. I'll take warm fingers.

On the plus side, they're extremely durable and armoured at basically all of the contact points.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 5, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

Insulated vests are one of my favorite items. They keep you warm but without the overheating nature of some jackets, plus they provide extra pockets for winter rides. This vest with a wind jacket will give you a broad range of temps and weather to handle. Its not as stiff and bulky as some other wind-proof and insulated vests, which is nice - so its something you can run or ski in, also.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on January 5, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: Runs large

Easy on/easy off. If your feet are the type to get COLD, then you might want something tighter and more insulated, but for keeping the wind and water/slush out, you can't beat these. The insulated shoe covers usually are really tight and don't handle road spray very well.

A big plus is they work well for both road and mtb shoes. AND - since they're so easy to take on and off, they're great when you return from a ride with inoperable hands. Dry feet = warm feet to me, and since they don't take 15minutes to put on, they're my favorite.

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jason sager

jason sagerwrote a review of on December 17, 2014

packs soooo small
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

A very versatile bag, its great down to about 30*, so dress accordingly - but this is my favorite summer bag. Warm enough for when it dips to freezing but great for when its warm. Its a semi-fragile bag, more so when its being packed with other gear than what you're laying on...but that, I feel, is more because the stuff sack is pretty thin and fragile, and since I motorcycle camp often, things end up rubbing.

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