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Greg Deemer

Greg Deemer

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Greg Deemer

Greg Deemerwrote a review of on July 10, 2016

2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If you're doing casual-paced rides on rolling terrain, these cryo blue pads will get the job done. However, demanding conditions such as tight criterium races and steep curving descents will have you pissin' your bibs. If it's raining, you better add 250% to the standard braking distance you are used to. Don't try anything new in the rain with these pads.

I've put about 6,000 miles on my Reynold's Assault SLG wheelset that I purchased in 2014. Still using these same stock pads and they have a ton of life to go. I feel like that is the problem, they harden, oxidize, and essentially feel like you are braking with plastic. Dirt builds up easily and calcifies the pads. I've started using 250 grit wet sand paper once per week to take off the hardened black layer that builds up so quickly.

Sadly, there's not much you can do in the first few years of owning your Reynolds wheels. They require you to use these. Reynolds now produces the Cryo blue Power stop, that offers a larger braking surface and supposedly some performance increasese. But they are on the order of $75 bucks. Lucky for me, my Reynolds warranty is up at the end of the month and I'm free to purchase what I please. Probably going with Swiss Stop Yellow.

Bottom line: Only buy them if you are still under warranty. These pads are miserably ineffective when you need them most

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Greg Deemer

Greg Deemerwrote a review of on May 15, 2016

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The first thing you will notice about this cage is just how thin the material is. Major kudos to Blackburn for achieving such a low-weight cage with a polycarbonate material. It holds onto bottles well, and I have only lost one when taking my road bike onto some pretty chunky gravel / hard pack sections of road...so I would call that user abuse and not blame the cage.

The first drawback with this cage is related to my opening statement. The material is THIN. When loading a topped-off 26oz bottle, the weight and height of the bottle itself leads to more side-to-side sway since the material bends so easily. I would recommend using a 22oz bottle with this cage and not go any larger.

Secondly if you find yourself frantically trying to put the bottle back into the cage when you realize that the group is dropping you and it's time to mash, you're going to break the cage. I've done it. Hit the upper-most portion of the cage (where you see the little blackburn flame logo) with the bottom of your bottle and some piece of the cage will shatter. Mine broke near the bottom.

Bottom line: A bargain cage that holds (small) bottles well, but it may not last too long.

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Greg Deemer

Greg Deemerwrote a question about on March 15, 2015

I have a set of 2014 Mavic Crossmax SLR wheels that I was hoping to use for a Niner One 9 RDO build. However, it just occurred to me that all Sram 1x drivetrains have 11-speed cassettes and trigger shifters. Will an 11-speed cassette fit on the Mavic SLR freehub?

I suppose I could buy the 1x front crank, and then purchase a 10-speed cassette and trigger shifter from another Sram group...is it worth going through this extra trouble?

Thanks,
Greg

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