Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50
Garson Fields

Garson Fields

, Employee

Park City

Garson Fields's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Biking

Garson Fields's Bio

Competitive Cyclist Marketing Copywriter. Summit Bike Club Enduro Team Head Coach. Uprooted New Englander. Swimming Hole Enthusiast. Coffee Drinker. Deep Thinker. 2018 Utah State DH Champion, CAT1 30-39. USAC #201871. UVM Cycling Class of '09.

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on February 8, 2019

4 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: True to size
Height: 6' 0"
Weight: 165 lbs
Size Purchased: Large

These things look great and they're clearly built to withstand years of hard use without issue. As someone who finds that size large jackets from Patagonia and Arcteryx fit perfectly, the fit was spot on. Ultimately, I couldn't quite get past the zipper and flap being on the wrong side. Obviously, Euros will disagree, and that's totally fine. It's such a little thing, but considering the asking price I chose to return it rather than deal with the minor annoyance.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on February 8, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Full coverage, huge field of vision, perfect fit with most helmets, easily swappable lenses, and that unsurpassed Oakley lens quality. They're expensive, but they're really, really good. The Jade Prizm Sapphire lenses cover pretty much all the bases for me. Having a low light night riding is a nice bonus. I'm not crazy about all of the color options, but it's hard to knock them for what amounts to straight up personal taste. I'd buy another set, no question.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on January 31, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If you have gear that you wear day in and day out, this will make your life better. Ski/snowboard boots, running shoes, gloves, etc. If you sweat in them, this thing will dry them out pronto, which can seriously extend the life of your gear. These things aren't cheap, but they're definitely built to last. Plus, it feels good to support a legitimate independent business that's headed up by a Backcountry alumnus. I was skeptical at first, but consider me a convert. I see this being a staple of my gear room for many years to come.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on January 27, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've been looking for a board exactly like this for longer than I care to admit.

After 15 years or so of riding exclusively mid-stiff twin freestyle boards, I went down the throwback shape directional board rabbit hole like everyone else. Owned a few, tried a bunch more. Liked the float, and a directional board makes sense for my riding, but the pow-specific directional shapes have some real drawbacks as daily drivers, and I REALLY don't get along with the soft foldey nose/stiff tail flex profile that you get with traditional freeride boards. I've been looking for something that floats like a pow board, rails hardpack turns like a traditional freeride shape, and has the predictable, supportive flex (especially in the nose) that you get from a hard charging twin. The Model A checks those boxes for me in a big way. Yeah, it's expensive. But I'd rather pay the price for something that's this close to perfect then save a few bucks and be disappointed yet again.

It's hard to tell online, but there's some VERY intelligent shaping and construction going on with this board. The bamboo/carbon fiber chassis does an amazing job deadening chatter, sort of like a Never Summer Proto Type II, but unlike any of the other heavily damped boards I've ridden, the thing has POP. Then there's the shape, which has a bunch of easily overlooked but very important elements that make it obvious that the folks at Snoplanks were focused on getting it right, and backed it up with a LOT of on snow testing. I'm only a few days in at this point, but I can say with zero hesitation that this is WAY better than the next best board I've ridden.

6' tall, about 165 lbs. Loving the 158, and now wanting the 162 as well.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on November 28, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

These narrow/wide E.Thirteen chainrings are a really solid replacement or upgrade option. Chain retention is about as good as anything else, and they seem to hold up longer than some of the alternatives. Plus, they're relatively affordable. An all around good choice.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on November 28, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Full cut helmets are pretty great, and this is the best one I've found, full stop. It's light, it fits great, and it makes you look like a little kid ski racer. What more could you ask for?

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on November 28, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

It's generally not a great idea to reuse 12 speed SRAM master links. Do yourself a favor and pick up a four pack and use fresh ones instead. Throw one in your riding tool kit, or borrow a trick out of your favorite racer's playbook and tape one to your derailleur housing so you always have a spare.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 10, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Dropper posts have become as integral a component to the modern mountain bike as disc brakes and tubeless tires, but unlike the aforementioned, they still seem to cause riders tons of problems. In my case, it seems like the durable options are only available in short stroke configurations, and the popular longer stroke options tend to display reliability that is, well, spotty at best. I took a chance on a 185mm Revive based on a few personal recommendations, and I'm sold. The hardware is appropriately sized, the stroke is smooth, the main bushing seems to have a nice snug fit, and the actuation is consistent and predictable. It's a bit more expensive than some of the better known options, but from what I can tell, it's money well spent, especially for those of us who can put a longer stroke dropper to use.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 10, 2018

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

As far as I'm concerned, the XTR 9000/9020 crankset is the very best mountain bike crankset ever built. They're light, stiff, impact resistant, and absolutely reliable, which is a combination of factors that places them miles ahead of any carbon fiber crank arm, at least for those of us who are prone to crank arm strikes. Unlike the crank arms, this chainring is super flimsy. Mine bent almost immediately, and I still genuinely have no idea what I hit. That's not terribly surprising though, as I've had the same experience with these composite-reinforced Shimano 1x rings in the past. They just don't seem to hold up.

So for those of you running a 1x drivetrain, keep your superior Shimano crankset, but pass on this chainring and get a Wolf Tooth instead. You can thank me later.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 10, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

These have been a bit of a departure from what I've historically run, but I've been really psyched on these. I typically run thiner grips (Sensus Lites have been my go to recently), but I was looking for something a bit larger to keep the hands feeling fresher. The Knuckledusters strike a nice balance of being a bit bigger OD than some others, without overdoing it. I'm also sold on the design, which is a well thought out hybrid of a mushroom pattern and an MX style half waffle. The rubber compound breaks in quickly, and thus far doesn't seem to be wearing appreciably. I've also had zero issues with the single clamp arrangement. Very happy with these.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 10, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

OE branded components typically get a bad reputation, which is a shame, because Santa Cruz's carbon bars are genuinely better than most aftermarket options. Unlike many (most?) 35mm carbon bars, they've got a finely tuned flex that's comfortable, without feeling noodley. The 800mm width and 20mm rise are both sensible figures that allow these bars to work for a fairly wide range of riders and bikes. After years of riding Renthals, I've grown accustomed to a bar with a bit less sweep (I prefer the shape of the ENVE M7 bar, all things being equal), but nevertheless I've been really happy with these.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 10, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

This is the best shoe that Five Ten makes, which arguably makes this the best shoe out for mountain biking on platform pedals. I've worn out plenty of pairs of Five Tens over the past decade, including a few pairs of Impacts and a pair of Impact VXI's. I've also racked up plenty of miles in Freeriders and Freerider Contacts. Thus far, the Freerider Pro is my hands down favorite by a significant margin.

They're sticky and supportive like the Impacts, but a bit softer in the midsole, which translates into better pedal feel. They're also dramatically lighter. They're stiffer than the Impact VXI, Freerider, and Freerider Contact, all of which cause my feet to cramp due to the lack of support. As compared to the rest of the Five Ten lineup, the upper has proven to be much more durable and more resistant to taking on moisture.

I've been wearing the same pair since February 2017, riding 2-3 times per week consistently and running a pretty aggressive pedal pin setup, and the sole is finally starting to tear under the ball of the foot. I highly doubt that any competing shoe would have held up this long.

At this point, I'd pay retail for these rather than accept anything else for free. Shoes are a crucial contact point when you're riding flats, and the Freerider Pros are really in a league of their own.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments