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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinif

Brooklyn, NY

Brian Quinif's Passions

Climbing
Skiing
Running
Biking

Brian Quinif's Bio

I love getting outdoors, exploring new terrain, and pushing myself harder.

Instagram: @bquinif

Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on January 11, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

Thie parka is very warm (I've used it down to around 0F so far) but also looks quite sharp, with what I would call a bit more "socially acceptable" look. Previously I used to wear a bright orange Fitzroy parka around town...that one is just as warm or warmer (and lighter) but is extremely loud. Back to performance, though: the Jackson parka is much longer, coming down to mid thigh and also has a thicker/more durable shell. This one will definitely hold up to a lot more regular wear abuse, and I will save my Fitzroy for climbing pursuits when counting grams is more important. I recently discovered that my Jackson parka will fit over a suit jacket no problem, so now I'm using it as my overcoat even on more formal occasions: it's just too warm and cozy to leave home.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on December 17, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I keep one of these (60cm/double)on my harness for pretty much any multipitch outing for use as a rappel extension and anchor point. Avoid shock loading such a setup, but nylon is much better than dyneema, as it is slightly less static. Tons and Tons of uses for these.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on December 17, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I gave it as a gift but have feedback to share

Awesome photochromic lenses + a really generous range of view make these goggles hard to beat. I've always been a cheapskate when it comes to goggles, but it was definitely worth laying down some bucks for a meaningful goggle upgrade for my better half.

So far no complaints at all but need to accumulate more mileage before this review could possibly be upgraded to 5 starts. Stay tuned.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on December 17, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Maybe it's hard to call a 9.7mm rope skinny, but this one is plenty thin and light for my purposes, yet with enough beef to provide some staying power. The bright green color is easy to spot and looks great in pictures, as well. I have a 70m, which is usually more rope that I need, but I decided to carry a 70m rather than something shorter + a tag line. No complaints on that setup so far.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on December 16, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I initially got the Microtraxion to use as part of a solo toproping setup (yes, roped climbing while alone is especially dangerous...don't try this at home), but it has tons of uses. This is a really lightweight addition to a glacier travel setup that could make crevasse rescue much quicker in the right hands (compare the ease of use and flexibility vs having a regular pulley or a prusik-minding pulley). It's certainly not an inexpensive product, but there is a lot of value to be had for the money. While at the end of the day it's best also knowing down to accomplish some of the same tasks with a minimalist setup (i.e. just prusiks and biners), a Microtraxion can really help speed things up and improve efficiency. Two thumbs up here.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on December 16, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

These are the only climbing skins I've owned, and I've only used one other variety (some BD skins), so take this review with a grain of salt. However, I have been pleased with the glide they provide and have had no issues with them. The provided tool for trimming them down to size is a little tough to use, but there are many other ways to accomplish trimming. These are hardly the lightest or fastest skins out there, but they have been quite reliable for my use.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on November 19, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

After a while wearing more minimalist shoes such as the Nike Free, last year I decided to switch back to a slightly more substantial shoe for logging most of my road mileage and was very happy with the Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 31...so much so that I put 500 miles on them before deciding it was time to replace them. Well, waiting so long was certainly a mistake:. Once I got my new pair of these Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 32s, it was clear to me why I had been feeling some knee and foot pain lately: my old shoes were totally dead from overuse. Having said that, the new ones feel like a dream, and I'm very excited to start logging some mileage with them.

For a little comparison, my current trail shoes are the Nike Air Zoom Terra Kiger 3, which are actually slightly lighter than these shoes. However, when running on hard surfaces I can tell a big difference in having the extra cushion from the road shoes.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on November 16, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I gave it as a gift but have feedback to share

I picked up the Luna harness for my fiancee this weekend, since she has been coming to the climbing gym enough that it didn't make sense to keep renting harnesses. Of course I made sure to get one that has adjustable leg loops and spots for ice clippers for her imminent future as an ice climber...well, a guy can dream, can't he?

Anyway, she found the harness to be quite comfortable, and the bright, solid color has a really nice look (contrasts great with her usually dark color scheme). The adjustable leg loops are nice, even if they dont get used for ice/winter, but the adjustment points are pretty low profile.

I have to say that I was a little surprised at how big the size S harness was, though. She is fairly close to the middle of the size range for that size, yet she needed to tighten the waist band pretty close to all the way. It still fit properly, but if I were on the margin of two different sizes, I would definitely size down with this harness.

With more use this review could get upgraded, but so far it's too soon to give a 5 star.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on November 2, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I don't always use an assisted belay device...but when I do I use a Grigri2. There's a reason why "assisted belay device" sounds so foreign and hard to say: most people just generically refer to them as "grigris." I generally stick with an ATC guide as my default belay device for a variety of reasons (easier to lead belay, can belay two seconds or second on twin/half ropes, can do double rope rappels), but the Grigri2 does have an important place in my kit. It certainly adds an extra layer of security when belaying, especially if the belayer is less experienced (or outweighed). It can also be used as for various rope soloing setups (don't try that at home, kids).

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on October 29, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I really can't think of any way to improve upon this product: the rings are very light, yet made of solid aluminum for better safety. I plan to use these primarily for rappel anchors but may also experiment with some primitive slackline setups.

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Brian Quinif

Brian Quinifwrote a review of on October 29, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This hate is definitely not easy on the eyes. I believe fugly is the technical term, but it was cheap (on sale) and will fit nicely under my climbing helmet on really cold days. I'll be keeping it.

Note: I don't believe the version I bought was marketed as "womens." Not that it matters, though.

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