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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.'s Passions

Climbing
Skiing

Bogdan P.'s Bio

Climber. More so a winter climber than rock climber. although I at least dabble in every discipline. Mainly focus on modern alpine routes though.

Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on August 9, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

First: thank you black diamond for not listening to the masses. Most great alpine climbing clothing and campwear is designed well at first, but altered when it's discovered that it's easier to market to the masses than to the core community (just look at anything and everything by TNF). Thank you for not going down that road black diamond. This tent is perfect for it's intended use, and without it alpine climbers would be left without a unique and indispensible piece of gear in their quiver.

Buy this tent if you ever find yourself asking these questions before a climb:
1) Should I bring a bivy sack instead of a tent?
2) are there any platforms big enough for a tent on this route?
3) Should I ditch the tent entirely and just climb single push to the top?

Buy this tent if your reaction to a heavy pack is fear. Don't buy this tent if you pack anything resembling a toothbrush.

As you can tell from the other reviews, yes it doesn't hold up well to rain, but why are you climbing in the rain? Rain causes rockfall and comes with lightening. It's dumb to climb under falling rocks in a lightening storm. Don't do it.

You get the idea. This is a climbing tent, i.e. it's a piece of climbing equipment. It is not a base camp tent. It is not a backpacking tent. It is not a car camping tent. Mine sees uses in all those functions, and it's passable, and mainly comes out because I'm lazy and goes up/comes down easily and quickly, but it's not what the tent is made for.

When it's time for a multiday alpine climb, and you can afford the luxury of a tent in your bivies this is one of the only tents on the market that even exists that you may consider bringing.

It will take minimal room in your pack (but still a lot by alpine climbing standards, it is after all a tent), won't weigh you down much more than two ultralight bivy sacks but will give your boots, socks and gloves a better chance to dry overnight than a bivy sack, it's only 4'x6' making it easier to find a place to pitch on steep and uneven ground, it stands up well to the wind, folding, but not breaking under heavy gusts (>60mph), light winds pump the walls and actually air the tent out, it goes up and comes down very quickly, so you don't waste precious time breaking down camp. The only downsides to this tent are its length, which at 6' may be too short to accomodate some climbers (although you can curl your legs up a bit and make it work if you're only slightly taller), and the way the door is attacked at the bottom instead of the side, which makes harder to keep snow out of the tent (the Mountain Hardware Direkt 2 had a better door design, but I think it's been discontinued). But if you need this kind of tent, you'll probably buy this anyway despite the downsides, because there's nothing else on the market in this class.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on March 11, 2019

Good winter bivy bag
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

First thing I did was cut out the pointless mosquito netting. Should tell you all you need to know about where this review is coming from.

This is a good lightweight bag for alpine climbing. It is not suitable for summer rock routes where the material is simply too skimpy to serve any use. It will not keep you dry if it rains. I spent a night under constant spindrift though and stayed perfectly dry where without the bivy sack I'd have been soaked. Word of caution though: you want a narrow sleeping pad. I was using the large version of the Thermarest Neoair XTherm and it stretched out this bivy sack enough to go taught over my chest. I couldn't turn over, which was a problem, because it meant I took all that spindrift to the face. Swapped it out for a narrower sleeping pad though and now it's all good.

Why they'd put mosquito netting in a non-waterproof bivy sack though is beyond me.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on January 24, 2019

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've had this shovel for 6 years, and I always find myself trying to get out of taking it along by telling myself avy conditions are not as bad as they seem, that I'll make conservative terrain choices and don't need a shovel, or any other kind of rationalization you could think of. It's not the headspace you want to be in, but at 1.5lbs it's really unpleasant to add to my kit, especially if I'm taking any technical climbing gear along for the ride.

Lighter weight shovels are usually more expensive (e.g. full carbon fiber shovels retail for 3x as much) or not functional (e.g. snow claw). There are some shovels on the market now which employ a metal blade with a carbon fiber shaft and weight nearly half of the Deploy 7. Much more palatable.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on December 15, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The crank is much easier to flip open and close again than on older bd screws (or petzl and grivel). Crank arm is more flimsy though and in really sticky ice I worry I might bend it while turning against resistance, but no more than I worry with the petzl crank arms. Overall I prefer these cranks over the old BD express cranks.

Haven't noticed any difference in how easily they screw in relative to the petzl ultralights.

These screws have a larger bore hole than the old BD express or the competition from Petzl. This may make them easier to clean, and better for v-threading (it's easier to draw a cord through a larger hole, and requires less precision to connect two holes that are larger than two that are smaller when making the v-thread). I would prefer a smaller bore hole though for my 13-16cm screws I use most. If I put in a longer screw and it bottoms out prematurely, I like to be able to remove it and screw another screw into the same hole. If the original screw to bottom out is one of these new BD ultralights, then I can't substitute in any other kind of shorter screw except another BD ultralight. Not ideal.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on November 8, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I like that this is pocket sized and the short (6") rubber hose nozzle that comes included. I can put the flask in an inner chest pocket, where it wont freeze on winter outings (e.g. backcountry skiing, climbing, etc), and the nozzle protrudes just far enough to reach my mouth when needed (if i unzip my jacket a bit to get at it).

Two points for improvement: (1) the nozzle needs a way to be sealed (picture the nob used to seal a camel back hose). Otherwise it will drip if compressed (e.g. while stored inside a loaded pack). (2) the lid would be better in a side mount rather than top mount configuration to make it less bulky when stored in a pocket (again picture a camelbak, and think of how the lid is mounted for storage in a backpack inner pocket). Basically I just want a mini camelbak that I can store in a pocket on my jacket, but this is the closest you can get.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on October 28, 2018

Adequate technical piece for alpinism
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a review for technical users (climbers, skiers, etc), and is less relevant for non-technical uses like casual camping or even expeditionary basecamps. Long story short: if you need an ultralight cold weather pad, this will do, but the regular sized one pairs better with other ultralight gear, so avoid the temptation to get a large.

Used this pad around 5 times camping on snow/ice at altitude (5000-6000m), mainly in glacial high camps at the base of climbs, but also on the climb itself in one case. It kept me warm, and packed small so it was easy to fit inside a technical pack, and is lightweight. I have not had durability issues, but also have not stressed it too much.

I sleep with ear plugs (wind) so I have no opinion on how noisy it might be.

The single compartment design makes the pad lightweight but also extremely vulnerable to damage. It is only fully functional when fully inflated with the user laying flat, otherwise it tends to compress in areas and leads to notable heat loss into the ground. When fully inflated it resembles a balloon, and seems equally susceptible to catastrophic failure. This is a direct consequence of the design of the pad, and the price you pay for going ultralight. Were it to have popped, I had ropes and a pack as a backup, or baring that retreating through the night. Not ideal, but tolerable for me. If that's not tolerable for your use cases (e.g. retreat is a multiday affair), this may not be the right purchase.

This is a technical piece for me. For more casual/everyday use I would get something with more redundancy (e.g. Sea to Summit Comfort Plus with the dual compartment design) or pair a summer pad (<3R value) with a 3/4 length foam pad (e.g. therm-a-rest z lite). However, for demanding multiday outings at the edge of my physical and technical abilities nothing else available on the market competes, so I'll begrudgingly take this balloon-pad and hope it doesn't pop. Wish something more durable and as lightweight were available, but far as I know there's nothing else.

Final note: light and fast users would probably prefer the regular size to the large. The size large is too large to comfortably fit two inside a bibler-style tent like the black diamond firstlight. It is also too wide for comfortable use with some bivy sacks. I found it stretched my black diamond twilight sack laterally, tightening the fabric over my chest so much I couldn't rotate my body. I've since replaced it with a regular sized pad, so that next time I'm not stuck enduring spindrift to the face all night.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on October 22, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 6' 1"
Weight: 172 lbs
Size Purchased: 44

Before I say anything else let me say I know the g2 sm is lighter, has an easier and better fit and and is possibly warmer. I haven't used the G2 SMs and this is not a comparison. The Spantik is an awesome boot and I just want to highlight why it impressed me on its own merits.

It's a warm boot. Used it at ~0F, at 3000m, ice climbing on a shaded north face. Used it winter north-face Alpine climbing proper at 4000m. Used it summer alpine climbing above 6000m in single digits. Even bivied with them on at those altitudes (don't ask why). Toes sometimes got cold but I never worried about it getting dangerous. I've had repeated cold injuries in the past and have learned a pretty keen sense of what's safe and unsafe cold in my toes but also have more cold sensitive toes than most. In these boots in those conditions I always felt safe and "nimble" while partners with other lighter boots struggled with cold feet.

The boots facilitate using approach skis. The same ridifity that works against this boot on highly technical terrain makes these boots better performing on approach skis. It's still not easy skiing, but it's a vast improvement over all other synthetic double boots. This makes it easier to reach pristine, solitary ice climbs. Probably doesn't hurt in glacier bound expeditions either like to the Ruth.

They work as substitutes for down booties. The outer boots are insulated, unique among synthetic double boots. This means you can wear them alone without the inners. The inner boots can stay in your sleeping bag to dry out while you complete short errands around basecamp or take care of business wearing just the outlers

Regardless of what other boots I may own or what other boots are out there the spantik will always have a place in my lineup.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on October 14, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

These do not work with the penultimate version of the nomic. The screw hole doesn't line up properly, and the new screw is too fat to fit in the old nomic bore hole. Using the thinner screw from the old version of the griprest you can mount this new griprest in the medium position (there are small, medium and large configurations), but it is not a confidence inspiring interface. The pommel doesn't come up flush against the grip on the old tools when mounted like this, and it looks like it the griprest/pommel might lever off, and with sufficient weight just shear through the screw. Most likely they only work for the new nomic and the ergonomic. People at Petzl seem to be taking a page out of Apple's playbook and trying to force you to upgrade your tools to benefit from any of the new features.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on October 13, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Been using this glove for two years, mostly winter climbing (ice and mixed climbing) and alpine climbing, but also skiing a bit. It's a good glove. Liked it enough to buy a second pair to swap in when the other pair gets soaked through (although I got them for maybe 60% retail).

It's surprisingly warm and dexterous for its weight. The fleece lining does the trick since it's intrinsically more dexterous than a puffy material like primaloft. Fleece lining can only go so far, and if you want the warmest glove this isn't it but this is likely as warm as you can get before you need to rely on some kind of lofting material for insulation, and thereby sacrifice dexterity.

The leather outer is also pretty durable but retains too much water. It's held up well to the wear and tear I've put it through but it does get wet and once soaked it takes a long time to dry. Thankfully most of the back of the glove is nylon mitigating this problem a bit but this is still not a waterproof glove. Hardly even water resistant. No glove is actually water proof though and this glove makes up for the poor water resistance elsewhere.

For anything short of climbing through a soaking wet spring ice climb or groveling through low angle warm snow the glove is pretty good. It will get wet but unless you're on a multiday backcountry trip you can dry it by the heater overnight. Two pairs will ensure that even if it's a very wet day that you can just swap it out halfway through for another fresh pair. Sure you could pay double for a gortex lined glove in the same weight class and get similar all day functionality but I'd rather have twice the longevity at the expense of having to swap out gloves at some point during the day.

For what it's worth I also have black diamond enforcer gloves which I use if I expect lots of groveling or a really wet day, but 90% of the time I'm using the OR extravert instead because it's more nimble, I worry less about trashing it, and it's almost as warm.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on September 28, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm on my second pair of these after dropping the first pair rummaging through my pack in the dark on an alpine start. Third pair of glacier glasses, and have played around with climbing partners too. Used this pair extensively in the Mont Blanc range, Cordillera Blanca and during the winter in the Rockies. Mostly climbing, but also skiing on sunny days. A couple of key points that stand out for me:
1) Light adaptive lenses are good for long days. You can keep them on from the dim light of early morning until dusk without going blind from too much shade at the start/finish or too much light at midday. The light adaptivity is pretty fast, and seamless. It doesn't for instance pose any problem when moving from light to shade on a climb/ski, although it can be a problem when driving on bright days if you suddenly enter a tunnel at 70mph or go under an overpass. The transition from light to dark is so rapid in that situation that the lens doesn't have time to adapt and you can't see in the darker tunnel/overpass. They are not rated for driving anyway though, so shouldn't expect anything different.
2) The frame is adjustable. The part that goes over your ear can be bent to fit your head better. The fit is sufficiently good that I don't need a keeper leash. They are so snug I never worry about them falling off, even in a violent lead fall.
3) The classic shape of the earpiece makes it easy to put these glasses on or take them off without adjusting your helmet. The more classic style glacier glasses from Julbo (flat, with a wrap around ear piece) are much harder to get on and off. Combined with #2 above this means I can do my alpine start, and then slip these on mid climb when the sun rises, without faffing around with my helmet at any point.
4) Never fogs up except when skiing while it's snowing, in which case ski goggles designed for flat light would be better anyway.
5) The side flaps are easily removable. The aesthetic of the glasses means that without the side flaps you can wear them casually around town without looking ridiculous (a welcome change from the prior bug-eyed design). Not the most stylish, but totally passable. I mostly use these without side flaps even when climbing. Only exception is on summer glaciated terrain where the light is something else, and the side flaps become more important.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on September 14, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Bought this for technical climbing and it's been a great rock, ice and alpine pack for anything that doesn't require an overnight, but also has doubled as a ski touring and urban pack. I almost exclusively use it without the top compartment and hip belt, but these come in handy in winter sometimes for extra volume and support either when back country skiing or when ice climbing in very cold weather where extra insulating layers are needed (mittens, parka, etc). It's also served as a great shopping and commuter bag around town. Durability has also been pretty good. The shoulder strap pivot has gotten a bit rusty (figuratively) over time, and the aluminum poles in the removable rigid backrest piece have broken, but neither has been a big issue, and I'm sure BD would warranty that if I sent it in (they've been very good about this in the past). The pack fabric has held up quite well to a beating and is particularly robust on the bottom and back where it would take the most wear (e.g. rubbing against the ground or when worming your way up chimnies). The fabric making up the left and right sides of the pack is not as robust, but it held up just fine to rubbing against the edges on my skis when a-framed on the handful of times I've used the pack touring. The pack also carries very well. Only wish it had some kind of diagonal ski carry capabilities and it would be my only day pack (BD has a superficially similar ski pack, but it doesn't carry or strip down as well).

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on August 7, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used this for a winter backpacking trip in northwest Ontario and a spring backpack in Wyoming, and for approaches to ice climbs in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Michigan and the Canadian Rockies over the course of 6 years.

The flotation isn't the best, but when weight and packability are also concerns, this snowshoe is a good compromise. Unfortunately, the extension tails don't work great, so don't bet on that to fix the flotation, just accept that you will posthole some at times. The crampons are second to no other snowshoe, and provide a lot of confidence on steep terrain. The frame is easy to securely harness to a variety of packs due to it's rigidity and the multitude of attachment points available. Finally, they don't cost very much, and last forever. Thick brush buried under snow, and sharp rocks have nothing on these things.

Recently took these into the mountains in Wyoming in late spring/early summer conditions. It was cold for the hike in, so the snowpack was firm and we were able to mostly walk in boots, even though it was very deep snow (meltwater cut 6-10 foot deep roaring streams into the snow pack only to disappear into moulin like caves, crevasse like fissures were opening in places where there are no actual glaciers, etc). Because the snowpack was firm, there was no reason to carry skis (~10lbs), but we brought the snowshoes (~4lbs) just in case. While we were out, temperatures spiked to 70F in the sun, and the snowpack turned to mush. We were 2 days hike out on fairly rugged terrain, with no trail/boot path to follow. With the snowshoes we were able to make it out in good time, and worried less about punch through snow bridges. Without, it could have been ugly.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on August 7, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

I bought this boot imagining it would be a good boot for alpine mixed terrain with serious ski approaches. What I had in mind was something like mixed faces in the mont blanc range (e.g. the Ginat on Les Droites). The liner seems a bit light for that, but otherwise the boots are a cool concept and design. I hope to see more along these lines in the future, because right now there's no real cross over ski/mountaineering boot aside from the procline.

Unfortunately, some of the features work against the boot by making it difficult to customize the fit. My foot is on the slightly wide side (D/E) and several parts of this boot would have needed to be punched/stretched to make this boot work for me with the stock liner (and a thicker liner wouldn't work at all). Unfortunately, because of the design features like the rubber toe cap and the integrated gaiter, my boot fitter was uncomfortable modifying this boot, despite being one of the more experienced and reputable boot fitters in the area (front range of Colorado). I begrudgingly returned these boots, but if it can't be made to fit, that's a nonstarter.

If you're looking at this boot, just hope it fits well out of the box, and you can move fast enough to keep your feet warm while climbing with the thin liner.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on June 29, 2017

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I bought the windburner that came with a 1.8L pot for alpine climbing as a party of 3 where we would need to melt snow for water but were not cooking food, making coffee, or indulging in any other such shenanigans. They can be used for other things, but as far as I can tell, this is their intended use, where the windburner really stands apart from the competition. I bought the windburner because I've had problems in the past with prohibitively long melt times in the wind (it did not disappoint, but this review is about the pot, not the entire system) and opted for the 1.8L pot thinking I would need it given the size of our group (3 rather than 2). In practice, the size provides little advantage.

If all you want is to melt snow into water, then any additional warming after the snow has turned to water is a waste of fuel. To avoid this I never let the snow completely melt before decanting some of the melt water and refilling with snow. As a result, melting snow turns into an iterative process.

Having a bigger pot probably allows me to wait longer between melt/pour cycles, but I doubt I'd be bothered by it if I were using the 1L version. The iterations are short enough that I need to babysit the thing continuously even when using the 1.8L pot. What I did notice though is how much space the 1.8L took up in my pack. It takes up as much space as my tent (black diamond firstlight; not including poles), or my sleeping pad (therm-a-rest prolite). That makes it a pain to pack given all the other crap you're already carrying in this scenario (i.e. climbing gear). There's also the weight to consider (4oz more than the 1L).

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on February 9, 2017

4 5

I've used this axe on technical alpine climbs up to AI3/WI3, and felt it performed very well compared to basic ice axes and technical ice tools. Unlike technical ice tools this axe is comfortable to grip and use in piolet cane mode, thanks to the flat head. The security of the pinky rest isn't super confidence inspiring on steep terrain, but it's never actually slipped on me while weighting it. The pick also penetrates ice and holds its sticks surprisingly well considering it's thickness and that the teeth are a bit rounded. The pick is well suited for axe belays as well, since the teeth only cover the half of the pick near the tip, allowing a rope to run under the shaft-side half with the pick without any risk of being shredded.

That said, there are two issues with this axe which could be improved upon.

First, the addition of a second bolt to the pick/shaft interface. The pick is held in place by a single bolt. This bolt loosens on me after sustained use in piolet traction mode (like an ice tool). The torque/vibrations that come from repeated strikes into the ice seem to work the screw loose, and once loose it becomes much harder to get good sticks. I now always carry a hex wrench with me when climbing with this tool. The hex wrench comes with the tool and isn't heavy, but it means I sometimes have to finish a pitch with a loose pick and wait until a belay stance to fix it.

Second, the lack of a leash clip loop on the pinky rest is a shame. When moving from piolet cane to piolet traction mode if you're using a leash you need to move it back and forth between the head (where it will affect your swing) and the spike (where it gets in the way of plunging). You need to move the pinky rest back and forth for the same reasons, but in the case of the pinky rest there's no avoiding it (after all, the mobile pinky rest is the entire point of this axe). The transition between piolet cane and traction modes is made easier on the Jorasses 2.0 from Grivel thanks to an attachment point for a leash at the pinky rest. It would be nice if Petzl adopted a similar strategy.

Both of these problems could be easily solved in an update of the tool. I've seen photos of a prototype next generation of the sum'tec, that uses a modular quark/nomic style head. This is encouraging, but hopefully Petzl doesn't consign us to using a quark pick on the updated sum'tec. Those picks have teeth along the entire length of the pick and prevent the use of axe belays. Hopefully petzl will design a new, less aggressively toothed pick to go with the nomic/quark style modular head if they commit to going that route, leaving the user the option of picking which pick to use (hint hint, if any petzl reps are reading this, please don't screw this up).

This is a great axe though. Given the choice I would definitely buy it again. In fact, I recently lost one of these in Chamonix like an idiot on an acclimation climb, and replaced it the same day without giving it a second thought, despite the practically limitless selection of axes available in the local shops.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a review of on December 3, 2016

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 6' 1"
Weight: 172 lbs
Size Purchased: 44

This is a good boot for summer routes in the alps (mixed/snow/ice), and would likely do just as well in the Cascades, but for me is not supportive enough or warm enough to work as a winter ice climbing boot. I've also used it on modern mixed routes, where I had no complaints.

The rest of this review is a comparison of the Mont Blanc Pro GTX (hereon simply Mont Blanc Pro) with the older Mont Blanc GTX. The latter is an entry level do-it-all boot from Scarpa, comparable to the La Sportiva Nepal Evo, both extremely popular boots with which people may have prior experience. Additionally, the Mont Blanc Pro appears to be displacing the Mont Blanc GTX in Scarpa's lineup, and the choice of name certainly suggests the Mont Blanc Pro is a "new and improved" version of its predecessor. This makes the comparison potentially informative for anybody considering a boot in this class (entry level "do-it-all" boot). I've used both the Mont Blanc GTX and the Mont Blanc Pro for around 18 months each ice and mixed climbing in the American Rockies, the lake superior region and alpine climbing in the Mont Blanc Massif in the summer/early fall, so I think I'm in a good position to provide useful feedback.

The Mont Blanc Pro has less ankle support and a more flexible sole than the older Mont Blanc GTX. This update works well in a more mountaineering oriented application (read: long routes, potentially long approaches, rock climbing in boots, etc), but caused me significantly more calf fatigue when front pointing than I had experienced with its predecessor, to the point where it slightly impaired my ability to lead on ice. The increased sole flexibility may also result in a less secure crampon fit. It might be coincidence, but I had a crampon (BD Cyborg) pop off twice while using the Pros, something that never happened with the Mont Blanc GTX.

Additionally, the Mont Blanc Pro seems less warm than the Mont Blanc GTX (which in turn is ever so slightly less insulated than the la sportiva nepal evo). Scarpa will tell you that the same amount of insulation is used in both their boots, but I suspect other design choices may have reduced the effective insulation of the Pros. For instance, whereas the Mont Blanc GTX used leather throughout the exterior of the boot, the Mont Blanc Pros have a hybrid leather/fabric exterior, which might not provide as much warmth. This seems especially likely in the tongue area where a tongue-boot interface made out of contiguous leather (mont blanc GTX) likely outperforms a tongue held in place laterally by thin elastic fabric (Mont Blanc Pro). The addition of the gaiter on the Mont Blanc Pro should make for a warmer boot, but does not seem good enough to compensate for other design changes (especially since you'll still be using a full length gaiter when it's really needed). My experience is subjective, and unfortunately I had few chances to climb in both boots in the same location when it was brutally cold both times. That said, based on a handful of instances, it seems to me I got uncomfortable in the Mont Blanc Pros in temperatures 10F warmer than what I could tolerate in the Mont Blanc GTX.

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Bogdan P.

Bogdan P.wrote a question about on December 11, 2013

I own a pair of g12's with the new-matic (front harness) binding, and I'd like to convert them to the cramp-o-matic (front bale) style for boots with a toe welt. I was thinking I would just buy a pair of replacement front points with the cramp-o-matic style bale on them, but I can't tell which kind of front points these are. I see pictures with the new-matic binding and pictures with the cramp-o-matic bindings. Can I order the cramp-o-matic style from backcountry.com?

If I can order the cramp-o-matic style front points, any idea how well they fit on a boot like the la sportiva nepal evo or scarba mont blanc? I own the latter, but they seem pretty similar.

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