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  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color

Current Color

  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color
  • NRS - 1in Tie-Down Straps - One Color

NRS 1in Tie-Down Straps

$4.50 - $15.50

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Select style & size:

Select options
  • Select options
    • One Color, 1ft
      $4.50
    • One Color, 2ft
      $4.75
    • One Color, 4ft
      $5.25
    • One Color, 6ft
      $5.50
    • One Color, 9ft
      $5.95
    • One Color, 15ft
      $6.95
    • One Color, 12ft
      $6.50
    • One Color, 20ft
      $8.95
    • One Color, 9ft pair
      $11.50
    • One Color, 12ft pair
      $12.50
    • One Color, 15ft pair
      $13.50
    • One Color, 20ft pair
      $15.50
    5577

    77 Reviews

    Details

    You can never have too many.

    Tough as nails, NRS custom-manufactures their 1in Tie-Down Straps to a tensile strength of 1500lb, then dips them in UV-blocking solution so they won’t wither away and flake-out after one season of use. Die-cast aluminum buckles cinch down and apply pressure across the entire width of the strap when you secure your craft to roof racks or trailers, while the length of each strap is woven right into the webbing as to remove any guesswork when choosing the right size for the job.

    • Burly cargo straps for any and all water-bound activity
    • Polypropylene material is ultra-tough and UV-resistant
    • Buckles use steel springs for a stronger, more secure grip
    • Waterproof tag gives you a place to write your contact info
    • Length is woven right into webbing for precise use
    • Item #NRS0097

    Tech Specs

    ⚠️ WARNING
    This product can expose you to chemicals including Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov
    Material
    [webbing] polypropylene, [buckle] die-cast aluminum
    Lengths
    2 ft, 3 ft, 4 ft, 6 ft, 9 ft, 12 ft, 15 ft
    Recommended Use
    paddling
    Manufacturer Warranty
    lifetime

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Great for kayaks

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Have used these straps to hold my kayaks on my roof for a few years now. I have no doubts or worries when on the highway or bending corners. NRS hit the nail on the head with another quality product here.

    Best Boating Accessory

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    This is definitely an essential for paddle sports or boating. It does a nice job of securing my cooler to the paddle board, but has plenty of other uses too. It is basically the duct tape of boating.

    Dirt, water, snow.... this is your strap

      NRS straps are renowned. I'll copy paste a story about how one old NRS strap saved a bunch of film and gear on the set of "The Revenant" when shooting in the frigged and wild Rockies from a river guide on the set..

      "The water was low, around 4,000 cfs, and I had only kayaked the river before. I did a quick scout run in my kayak and decided that the upper rapids were reasonable. But the last rapid was a bit more than I was willing to do in a raft with a $250,000 camera on board. I said that given the timing (they wanted to shoot natural light at 7 pm) we could get one run in and then would have to hump the boat out of the canyon. They laughed and said, ‘We have a helicopter, there will be no humping.’

      So the riggers set to work on the boat and I re-scouted my lines. There was a large 200-pound camera hanging off the front of the boat and numerous cables and wires weaving their way throughout. My first thoughts were of the numerous entrapment hazards on the boat and the extra swing weight extending out off the front.

      We didn’t get a chance to test the rig out before the heli shuttled it to our start point below the falls. We pulled out and had a good, but exhausting run. Then we jumped into the heli with the raft and shuttled back up for a second run.

      If we flipped, our plan was to attempt to re-flip but bail at the swinging bridge and let the gear do the last rapid solo. We had four safety kayakers with us. The helicopter pilot said that he’d swing his cable down and we could clip it on the boat and then he’d drag it to shore. I thought this sounded absurdly dangerous.

      On our last run, we flipped at the last big move. As we were about to abandon ship, the pilot did as he said and swung his line to us. He couldn’t have been more than 100 feet upstream of the swing bridge at this point. I thought, ‘This is what he said to do,’ so I clipped the line to the only available option: a sun-bleached, 20-year-old NRS strap that we used as a chicken line. I thought he was just going to drag the boat to shore, but as I jumped and swam to shore before the rapid, I looked back and saw our boat with camera was 200 feet in the air. I waited for the inevitable lawn darting, but it never came. By the time we hiked out of the canyon, the boat was de-rigged and trailered."


      I've personally used these straps for just about everything, to holding down skis, firewood, drybags, to a giant cedar hotub, they'll do it all.

      These are the straps you're looking for

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      In the outdoor recreation world, there are lots of choices, typically, and analysis paralysis is a real thing. Not so when it comes to boat straps. These are the gold standard. Use the thicker ones for frames on rafts, otherwise these 1 inch straps will do the job for just about everything else. I use a 1 footer for keeping high use items (pumps, waterproof boxes) close by and handy on my canoe and kayaks, and longer straps for securing gear. The 9, 12, and 20 lengths are great for strapping boats on top of the ol subaru. Last forever, and the name tag is a nice touch for sorting them out from your buddies after a long haul down the river.

      Simple and Effective

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      These straps get the job done for sure. I do like the relatively recent addition of the name tag that is sewn in by the buckle. No more spray painting the buckles to claim ownership or fighting with your friends on whose strap is whose.

      Must have river item

        I use these for strapping my backpack to my packraft. If your bag isn’t secure on your raft then you will be more vulnerable to flipping. Using lightweight packrafting straps don’t do the trick as well as the NRS which need less adjustment and tuning, which can be tricky to pull off once your on the water. A few extra feet of length doesn’t hurt to have either.

        Quality Straps

        • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

        bought these as a kick around for whatever and ended up using them to hang my kayak in my garage from a couple of hooks to free up space. So strong, durable, and easy to use.

        Super versatile must have

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        I have a bunch of these straps for when we're out on the river/lake and they're indispensable. Must have for kayaking, paddle boarding or just being wet in general.

        You will never have enough

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        These straps are super versatile. They work great on the raft but can also be used to keep things strapped to your roof or around camp. Buy a few and then buy a few more.

        So Many Possibilties

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        I use these primarily for strapping stuff down on my roof rack and keeping it secure. These things are amazing and one of those pieces of gear everyone should have in their closet. They are simple to us and are extremely durable. I am most likely going to picking up a few more of these.

        get more than you think you'll need...

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        I had one very dated NRS strap in my cam strap inventory and a handful of cheap/off-brand straps. Most of the rest had long since been 'loaned' to friends or left in other cars/boats/trailers etc., Purchased a grundle of NRS straps as in taking stock of my other straps, my NRS strap is oldest but still functioning perfectly. Use them for boating obviously--but they also get used for camping, moving, bikepacking and a myriad of other pursuits. Get some.

        Mawr!

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        Always more with the cam straps. I had my first strap failure this year on a four footer that had been in commercial service for at least 10 years, which I feel like is pretty darn good. Note: If you are new to the use of these things it will quickly become apparent that it's the shorties that get used the most, at least in a boating scenario (i.e. you'll need a lot more 3's and 4's than you will 15's)

        keep it simple

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        come on, i have had all kinds of cam straps. Rigging rafts, roof racks, dog leash what ever. Just get the NRS, the quality and size on the web, just keep it. Goofing around with designer cams is a waste of time

        Strap it down

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        Simple but effective. The buckle is stout and holds strong. The availability of many different lengths is great. These beat bungees and and plain old rope any day of the week.

        Are the NRS straps the same strength as...

        Are the NRS straps the same strength as the Thule 521?

        Ryan,



        Yup! Most 1 inch cam straps are going to be made from virtually the same polypropylene. The only difference between an NRS 9 footer and the Thule is that the Thule straps come with a little rubber bumper to put over the buckle. (I've been using cam straps on my vehicle for years without the bumpers to no ill effect.)



        Feel free to give me a shout if you have any other questions! 800.409.4502, ext 4456.



        Best,

        Lara

        Where are these straps made?

        Where are these straps made?

        Best Answer

        Hey Lenny P,



        These are made of a material called polypropylene ((C3H6)n). It's a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of outdoor and indoor textiles.



        Fun fact: polypropylene is recyclable!

        When you describe the loops straps as being...

        When you describe the loops straps as being 6' long, can I assume that is the total length of the two parts of the strap system together?

        Your picture could indicate that there are...

        Your picture could indicate that there are nine different lengths available but the "select option" box
        only shows the 3', 9', & 15'.

        If you don't carry the other lengths and are simply using NRS's generic picture maybe you could
        consider offering the others as I for one would be interested in some of them.
        Thanks

        The "select option" box shows which option are in stock. At the time I am writing this they have all lengths in stock and therefore all are represented in the drop down. That changes from day to day. I believe this is true of all backcountry.com listing.

        Hope that helps.

        What length and how many straps would I...

        What length and how many straps would I need to tie down two recreational kayaks on a kayak stacker?

        In my experience its best to err on the side of having too much strap. I recommend a 2, 12 footers for your endeavor. You could possibly get away with 9's (depending on how wide your boat is)but when I secure boats with these I lay the strap over the boat and under whatever you're using as your "anchor" (roof rack, side rails, etc) then double back, so the extra length gives you something to pull with. I find this is the best approach to give you the most leverage...and consequently get your boat on the tightest.

        Hopefully that helps.