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Description

Versatile, lightweight, and color-coded.

The Wild Country Anodized Rockcentrics Set is an excellent addition to any climber's rack, whether you're a beginner, a winter freak, or a weight-conscious trad climber. These versatile hexes can be placed in four different positions (maybe more if you get creative with it) thanks to Wild Country's proprietary Rock geometry with differently-tapered sides. Wild Country also added a Dyneema sling so you can leave more quickdraws at home, and each Rockcentric was anodized in a different color for simple organization and quick spotting.

  • Anodized
  • Rock geometry
  • Side tapers
  • Dyneema sling

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Wild Country Anodized Rockcentric Hex on Dyneema Set #3-9

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5 5

Hexes are not antiquated rock pro

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Wild Country Rockcentrics are hands down the best Hexes I've used. Easy to place one handed, and they set hard in their cammed position. I've never had one become loose or walk out of a placement. And this doesn't make it difficult for the second. All the second has to do to remove them is smack the long end of the nut tool repeatedly against them the opposite way it went in until it's jarred loose and then remove by hand. This can all be done one handed.

I'm a bit of a hex fanatic though, so certainly biased. I love placing them and have spent a lot of time practicing placing them. A good hex placement gives me an incredible sense of confidence on a climb as they are so bomber. I reach for the Rockcentrics hex first on a good stance. And yes I do also own cams, nuts, tricams, and other types of hexes. Each piece of gear has it's place on a climb. There are some climbs that hexes cannot be used at all. And there are also climbs where cams and nuts don't work so well. Use what is appropriate to safely protect the route. I'm f#@king glad I have hexes on my rack. I only wish Wild Country would make one size larger and four sizes smaller.

In addition to the Rockcentrics, I also own DMM Torque Nuts, Black Diamond Hexcentrics, and Metolius Curve Hex. Rated in that order from best to worst. So that will give you some comparison to other types.

DMM's are not bad, but don't let them fool you that four sizes are enough to cover a wide range of sizes. They also don't set as easily or as hard in their cammed position. Although I find them complimentary to the Rockcentrics due to slight differences in sizes in the same color.

Black Diamond are ok/acceptable, but not great. Maybe they work better in smoother stone, but it's not what I have in my area. My issue with them is that it is difficult to impossible to set them hard. When the second comes up and finds them sitting loosely in a crack such that they can lift it out by hand with no effort, that concerns me. The only advantage they have is they go one size larger in the #11 and four sizes smaller #1-4.

The Metolius Curved Hexes I find to be often disappointing. Mind you, I have the previous generation smallest #1-4 sizes that are no longer made. But it's the same geometry as the newer ultra light models that start at size #5 and goto #10. I get the impression that these hexes were engineered for one type of stone, or otherwise engineered to work around patents. My issue with them is that they are difficult to place, don't set hard and become loose, they are often unstable and pull when placed in a horizontal, set as hard as I can, and then test pulled sideways. I believe this to be due to them being narrower in width than other hexes. And the sideways nut/wedge placement that has a concave and convex surface is horribly un-useful for most of the rock in my area. It's almost never placed in this configuration.

If you want hexes on your rack, go for the Wild Country Rockcentrics and be done with it. They are the best available hex design I've used and I have no issues or hesitations with recommending them. (I have a feeling that in the future I'll shed all my other hexes from my rack and Rockcentrics will be the only ones left.) Unless you find yourself fascinated with hexes, or they are very common placements for the rock you climb on, then add the DMM Torque Nuts set or get larger and smaller sizes in the Black Diamond Hexcentrics or now discontinued Camp Carvex line that some retailers still have stock of.

5 5

Not just a novelty

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

These hexes are fun to use, and useful. However, I have not used any other brand or type of hexes. I debated between slung and wired hexes. Wired hexes are good for placing in deep cracks and would extend my reach (being under 5' I need every inch I can get) but I went with slung hexes to increase their positioning and camming ability. The curvature on these is almost enigmatic because no two sides are the same, and the hex is not symmetrical (BD and DMM seem symmetrical) which adds to their allure for me. They are curved to increase camming and/or rock security, and I love the different placement options. I figure that nuts are wired and can serve those purposes of wire advantages. Part of the reason I find climbing fun is the puzzle aspect. I have only led easy trad I have found these are bomber and there are so many places hexes can go, on the route, and making anchors. They are lightweight, attractive in colors, but noisy. Don't know why more people don't use hexes.

5 5

AWESOME

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I love these! these are just as good as the Black diamond wired hexes in my opinion. if not better! If a sling goes bad on these you can replace it no problem! Where if a wire goes bad, you have to retire the whole hex! I love these!