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  • Tyrolia - AAAmbition 12 Alpine Touring Binding - Solid Blue/Yellow
  • Tyrolia - AAAmbition 12 Alpine Touring Binding - Solid White/Black

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  • Tyrolia - AAAmbition 12 Alpine Touring Binding - Solid Blue/Yellow
  • Tyrolia - AAAmbition 12 Alpine Touring Binding - Solid White/Black

Tyrolia AAAmbition 12 Alpine Touring Binding

$398.95

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    • Solid Blue/Yellow, One Size
      $398.95
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    Details

    Fulfill your backcountry dreams.

    If it seems like everyone and their mom is offering an AT binding these days, it's because they are. (Free gear tip: Just because Mom offers you a discount on her homemade AT bindings doesn't mean you should buy them.) Tyrolia was one of the more recent entrants into the freeride-oriented AT game with the Adrenalin, and now the 84-year-old binding manufacturer is serving up the lighter, faster Ambition 12 Alpine Touring Binding, which uses the same technology as the Adrenalin but is a better bet for longer tours where covering serious ground takes precedent over hucking spine-compressing cliffs.

    The Ambition weights in at 4.5lbs per binding, which isn't featherweight but is 10oz lighter than the Adrenalin, and has a wide 42mm footprint that's designed with bigger skis in mind. Since larger skis require more powerful input, the Ambition's front bracket is made of metal, which resists torsional twist better than plastic, and also is less prone to the eventual toe slop that's an unhappy feature of most plastic-bracket AT bindings. Tyrolia has also done an excellent job of keeping the 90-degree pivot point directly under the toe, giving the Ambition an easier, more natural walking motion that's enhanced by four climbing aid heights.

    One of the drawbacks of standard AT setups is an unpredictable change in the flex of the ski due to the long plate that's mounted between the toe and heel pieces. In an inspired moment, Tyrolia built the Ambition with a FreeFlex system in which the heel and toe are connected by a floating tube, letting the ski flex naturally for a more predictable, consistent ride. As a bonus, this system also allows for virtually infinite adjustment, making the Ambition a one-size-fits-all binding (all boot sole lengths between 260 and 350, anyway—you'll be fine unless you're an XXL Sasquatch). It's compatible with AT and traditional alpine soles, and allows you switch between ski and walk modes without stepping out, saving you time and trouble. Something tells us mom couldn't whip all this up in her basement lab.

    • Item #HEA000A

    Tech Specs

    Release Rating
    4 - 12
    Boot Compatibility
    AT lugged, alpine
    Brakes Included
    no
    Safety Features
    AFS gliding plate
    Stand Height
    38 mm
    Heel Elevators
    yes, 0, 5, 10, 15-degree
    Claimed Weight
    [pair] 4 lb 8 oz
    Recommended Use
    alpine touring
    Manufacturer Warranty
    2 years

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Looking at putting these on a pair of Atomic Automatic 109's. I see my brake options are 105mm and bend them to 109 or 125mm and have them overhang 16mm. I lean towards 105mm and bend. Ammmmiright? Thanks for your input. Also needs some advice on skins for this setup.

    Hi Cannon,

    You could really go either way here with the brakes. Some ski shops won't mount bindings if the skis need to be bent out, so the 125's would be the 'safe' option here. General rule of thumb is 5mm below waist width and 15mm above, pretty much 6's to a half a dozen here.

    As for the skins, I recommend the G3 Alpinist, very popular and of the highest quality. Hit me up at 801.736.5363 for some sizing recommendations

    Thanks,.

    I've broken 3 pair of frechi's and a pair of dukes, how will these hold up? I'm very hard on my stuff.

    Unanswered Question

    I know they adjust to accommodate different boots. But if you're adjusting down/up several centimeters... do you need to re-drill & re-mount the heel post?

    I'm really curious how burly these are. Anyone really put these through the ringer? Can these take a 15 foot cliff drop? Anyone? Bueller?

    yes they can. very beefy. One unexpected release in more than 30000 vertical backcountry feet in 6 weeks of use. It was on my in-bounds experiment day on a re-froze choppy crusted line littered with groomer frags under a lift. The release was not necessary to save a knee, but the ski did catch very quick and very hard which rotated off at the toe piece. I'm 6'5" and 220-250 lbs (varies with equip/gear). Really freakin' impressed. Plenty beefy enough for guiding big AT boards in-bounds. I have it fully telescoped on 355mm boot shells currently. Even after purchasing I was concerned this would allow for moderate unwanted flex, but they have been very solid feeling. Only racing equip comes to memory as feeling more direct, lively and rigid. It's very tough to tell you're elevated above the telescoping design. I believe I saw 13mm somewhere. The toe pieces has a natural feeling hinge mech. I have the DINs set at 9.5 front and 10.5 rears which has served well through no-fall terrain even given my size and mass. This is my first ski mountaineering setup so I can't compare to any tech bindings. I was skeptical of wear on the lightweight plastic pieces, but everything looks as expected given use. They appear to be very well built and beefy in all of the right places such as the toe, heel, release mechanisms which is 'stupid easy' to engage or disengage. It has problematically frozen with ice 1x when removing skins on a summit. Cleaned easily with an ice-axe or ski pole. Very comfortably consistent, which is important when picking the lines that require self arrest tools ready to go.

    does this binding come with a heel track to adjust the position of the heel post? it is a white track that does under the heel piece. please see the attached picture



    thanks!

    Are people using this binding for in bounds skiing? I wonder if they would work for a lighter person and/or someone who isn't hard on gear. I'm thinking of putting them on my wife's skis, mainly in bounds but also some touring...

    Best Answer

    Hey Powderturn,

    These most certainly would work inbounds as well as touring. This bindings is quite beefy for a touring binding. I have several friends who ski this binding everyday, at least half of which are inbound days at Alta.



    For someone who is lighter weight this binding will do it all with confidence. Your wife should have no problem using this in and out of bounds.

    there's no way these bindings weigh 4.5 lbs per binding (as per your description above), so what do they weigh? is the 3lb 15oz in the tech specs accurate?

    There don't seem to be any break width options in the product selection? How do I select the break width and what options are available?