Free Shipping on Orders Over $50 - Some Exclusions Apply*
  • 1-855-712-0511

  • Live Chat with a Gearhead

  • 100% Guaranteed Returns

Marmot Sale 25% OffMarmot Sale 25% Off

Description

Explore the backcountry on your Tubbs Mountaineer Snowshoes.

Trek around in the mountains above Snowmass in your Tubbs Men's Mountaineer Series Snowshoe. These rugged, lightweight snowshoes have a flat nose and a tapered tail to give you maximum flotation, maneuverability, and stability on steep pitches and in powder. Tubbs' RII pivot system underneath your foot allows for lateral flex, so you get shock absorption and responsiveness on uneven terrain. This system won't allow for the shoe to rotate too far on a steep slope, yet it sheds snow off the back, so you don't end up carrying a few pounds of white stuff with you up the mountain. Aggressive crampons with extra long teeth on the Mountaineers give you excellent traction on the ascent and descent, and braking teeth give you stability on ice. These snowshoes fit up to a size 13 hiking or technical climbing boot.

Share your thoughts

Review Summary
5
3 4
2 3
0 2
0 1
0

What do you think of the

Tubbs Mountaineer Series Snowshoe - Men's

? Share a...

Write a review

No file chosen

Rather attach a photo from another website?

Rather attach a photo from your computer?

  • Product review:
  • Share a video
  • Share a photo

How familiar are you with the product?(Optional)

Invalid filetype.

Save

Here's what others have to say...

4 5

Tubbs Mountaineer Series Snowshoe

The binding is what makes this snowshoe great. I prefer the MSR lightening frame, but the Tubbs binding is the quickest to get in and out of and feels very secure (more so than the MSR binding). Also, unless you're a 300 pounder or carrying a huge load, you really don't need the 30 inch shoe - even here in Utah where the pow is super light, so I'd suggest going with a smaller shoe.

I want to get a really good pair of snowshoes...

Posted on

I want to get a really good pair of snowshoes for my mom.
Will these be a good option or should I go with some that are designed for women? If so why?

Best Answer Responded on

Petter,
These definitely fit the bill when it comes to "really good pair of snowshoes," however I would recommend you look at getting her the women's version. It's not that women can't wear men's snowshoes, it's just that women's shoes are generally smaller (for their generally lighter weights) and shaped subtlety different for their stride. Backcountry has both 21" and 25" women's shoes in stock which can be found here:
http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorgear/Tubbs-Mountaineer-Series-Snowshoe-Womens/TUB0043M.html
Hope this helps!

4 5

Not sure...

I'm a bit disappointed with my 30 inch Mountaineer's. After 1 long day of usage for the 1st time, the instep portion of both snowshoes was covered in knicks from the shoes hitting eachother. The vinyl covering that goes over the metal tube looks like it has taken a pretty bad beating. I'm not sure how many trips they will be able to withstand.

The actual usage was great. I wasn't getting the snow flying up the backside like I had with some other sets of snowshoes that I have used in the past. On the downside, it's a little tricky to turn around in really deep snow with the loose heel. I took the shoes off thinking the snow was that deep and I sunk down to my waist. My plan was to take a break and have lunch there, it didn't work as planned. Overall the bindings on them are great, the traction is great. The only thing I would change is reinforce the instep portion on the shoes to avoid premature failure.

5 5

Tubbs Mountaineer Snowshoes

I bought these as a gift for my nephew but I have had a pair of Tubbs Mountaineer snowshoes for almost 12 years and I can attest that they are the best. The newer ones have a much easier binding to get into and can be adjusted from one boot to another much easier than mine.I go up steep bluffs in the western part of Wisconsin and never have had any breakage of the snowshoes and can climb and go down anything.

Which is better -- the Atlas flexible...

Posted on

Which is better -- the Atlas flexible suspension system or the Tubbs rigid pivot bar?

Best Answer Responded on

Tough question Clare.

I'm going to answer purely based on personal preference. I prefer the rigid pivot over the Atlas suspension.

I tried the Atlas system when I was first looking at buying snowshoes and it did work great. It's super-responsive, flexes to make walking on a bit of a sidehill easier, etc. What I didn't like about the Atlas suspension is that it flicks snow up behind the person. Most people seem to get the snow in the butt or back...I'm short and the flying snow seemed to consistently hit at about where the collar on my jacket was, so I had a consistent stream of snow hitting my neck and going down my back, which got pretty annoying in a hurry.

I ended up going with an MSR shoe, which has a rigid pivot point, and I've been really happy with it. =)

-Andrea

Atlas seems to use a flexible boot suspension...

Posted on

Atlas seems to use a flexible boot suspension where Tubbs has a hinge or pivot -- which is better?

Responded on

Much as Andrea stated above, I believe its personal preference. The two schools of thought are 1) keep the shoe closer to parallel under the foot, or 2) let the shoe hinge and shed accumulating snow. Now the atlas system does have a natural "droop" that sheds and the tubbs system does actually have a stop that prevents it from going full 90 degrees and also has articulation because the hinge is mounted in a small band of its own.

I own tubbs. After my experiences, my thoughts go as follows: Both are good systems. The tubbs shed snow when playing in powder quite admirably and as long as momentum is on your side when running or jumping, they mostly stay under your feet. The atlas system is more likely to fling snow (which would annoy the bajesus out of me) but it would likely funtion better if situations involving running or jumping (dont ask, I get crazy when I go snowshoeing!)

Do these snow shoes come with any kind of...

Posted on

Do these snow shoes come with any kind of tote or bag for travel.

Responded on

No, Tubbs sells one as an accessory, but it's not included with the shoes.

Write your question here...

Any idea on...

Posted on

Write your question here...

Any idea on when the 30" version will be available?

Thx

Responded on

It is in stock now.

5 5

definitely FUN

They are great...the bindings
work really well.

I wear a size 14d boot. Will it fit in...

Posted on

I wear a size 14d boot. Will it fit in the binding.

Responded on

Unfortunately the bindings are only rated up to a size 13. You will be okay though if you're wearing a fairly low profile boot.

What options are there for someone with a...

Posted on

What options are there for someone with a size 13 4E boot? I've got a pair of Kamik NationPlus boots that are size 13. They're so wide that the binding seems to be unable to fit them in such a way that the boot can properly sit on the footbed of the snowshoe.Are there binding alternatives for someone with such a wide foot?

Responded on

You may not need snowshoes with feet that wide! But seriously, look into the Atlas 1230s or 1235s. The bindings seem pretty compatible as long as you're not using an extremely bulky boot. Also, it may be a long shot, but try calling some manufacturers and seeing if there is the possibility of a custom binding.

I am about 335 lbs and I want to start...

Posted on

I am about 335 lbs and I want to start snowshoeing. What brand and or size should I purchase?

Responded on

The Atlas 1235 is rated at "300+" but I'm not aware just how high they mean. Anything smaller than a 35 inch shoe is probably out of the question. On trails the 1235 should work for you as long as the powder isn't too deep and you don't plan to take an extra pack. Also, the Atlas 12 series bindings are extremely quick and easy to use (No laborious tinkering or tightening, just adjust the heel strap length and one quick pull to tighten the foot strap.) I suggest renting the largest size you can find and going from there. Good luck!

5 5

Good stuff

I live in norther colorado and we already have a few feet of the fluffy, and these shoes have done well. cant wait to see how they do when it gets really deep.

how to pick size for snow shoes

Posted on

how to pick size for snow shoes

Responded on

Weight (including pack) and possible snow depth are the main concerns. Look on the right side of this screen under TECH SPECS and then look at "recommended wight"--If you're hiking off trail in deep powder get a large shoe for better flotation (especially if using a pack).

will the binding fit a snowboard boot?

Posted on

will the binding fit a snowboard boot?

Responded on

These will fit snowboard boots. I used them with size 10 fusion salomon snowboard boots and my friend has size 12.5 fusion salomon's. Both worked fine. However, I have the MSR lightning ascents and they were infinitely better at climbing due to the edge of the frame designed for traction. If you're doing any sort of ascending with switch backs I wouldn't recommend any tubbs due to the tubing on the outside providing no traction. I think these would be great for generic snowshoeing though; just not for climbing steep pitches in the backcountry.