Lightweight InsulationLightweight Insulation

Description

Wake up refreshed.

If you don't get a good sleep tonight, you're going to be hurting in the morning. Luckily, you'll be crashing on the Therm-a-Rest Prolite Sleeping Pad. This lightweight, three-season sleeping pad keeps you warmly and comfortably off of the ground so you can get the rest you need.
  • Self-inflating design requires almost no effort to set up
  • Diagonally cut foam provides better insulation and reduces bulk
  • Mummy-bag shape cuts down on weight and rolled size
  • Grippy bottom material and a textured top keep you and your sleeping pad from sliding around during the night

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Review Summary
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Therm-a-Rest Prolite Sleeping Pad

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

Leave the X-Therm At Home

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

A Prolite is more than enough R-rating for most winter camping I've done. I use a torso Prolite and a foam Z-Lite in deep winter and I sleep great, with absolutely no cold spots.

If you're a picky sleeper, you might want the comfort of an inflatable Neo-Air, but if you're pretty hardy like me and can sleep anywhere (or learn how to), you can save a lot of weight with a simple Prolite instead.

4 5

Great for minimalist backpacking.

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Its great. I got the small and it is light, packs super small and provides enough comfort to get you through the night. Prob not the best for side sleepers but it gets the job done.

4 5

The real deal

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

As far as backpacking pads, the Prolite is about as good as it gets as bar as balancing weight, value, and comfort, especially for self-inflating pads. Sure, you can buy a NeoAir, but on a budget, the weight savings may not be worth it (4-6 oz is significant, but may not be worth the $80-100 price difference). The pad is really comfortable for its thickness, and the textured fabric does a great job of keeping your sleeping bag on the pad, as well as feels really durable. I've slept on it backpacking as well as on a friends floor a few times, and it isn't a great pad for side sleeping, but on your back, it does just fine. For those on a budget, or who want a good pad that's reasonably lightweight, comfortable, durable, and not too expensive, it's a great option. The only con I see is that it is a bit bulky, and the stuff sack included makes you fold it in half before rolling, which isn't the most efficient use of space in my opinion.

4 5

A classic

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Light, durable, and reasonably comfortable. For an extra 6oz you can get some more comfort with something else, but this hits the spot for lightweight backpacking. It'll be going with me on trips until it pops.

5 5

TAR ProLite 3 Size Small

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I recently picked up the small (20 x 47) Prolite 3 to use for 3 season. This is actually an irregular pad, which all I can find is that the logo is a bit wrinkled looking. Other than this, it works fine, and has not noticeable defects.

My size small weighs 11.2 oz sans stuff sack. (Not sure on the weight of the stuff sack.. I never use them.)

I have been a fan of the ProLite 4 for a number of years, but stopped carrying it when I got my NeoAir due to the weight. However, I find that the ProLites are quite comfortable pads for me, and rate them high due to this.

As well, I like that this pad uses a heavier, yet more durable 70D material on the bottom. This makes site selection a little easier on the brain, however, as with any air pad, always bring a repair kit anyway.

I give this pad 5 stars cause it just works.

Responded on

Hey Chad, how tall are you?

5 5

Long term quality

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have been using this pad for around 7 years now, at times spending more nights on it than in a bed while working in the backcountry. This is the longest lasting pad I have had, and it still does a fantastic job while packing impressively small. My only complaint is that the oil from my unwashed hair has discolored the orange fabric on the pad, but again thats after 7 years of frequent use.

Long term quality
4 5

Adequate

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a fairly good pad. Unless you have plenty of time for the self-inflating feature to kick in, get ready to inflate it yourself. That said, that's a minor nuance, and honestly, to be expected. The valve is awkward to inflate and every time I do I wish Therm-a-rest had designed a better valve.

If in doubt, get it. Packs next to nothing, weights next to nothing and you'll get a decent sleep with it.

Oh, and if size in your backpack is a concern, get a small, you don't really need that much padding on your legs, and the small hits all the important spots you do need a pad for.

Adequate

I am having trouble deciding between the...

Posted on

I am having trouble deciding between the Regular size and the Large. I like the idea of more width, since I am a resetless sleeper. Does anyone have advice? I am most concerned about how it packs,

Responded on

I'm 6' and decided to go with the regular and have no regrets. My toes drape over when stretched, but I could care less. The regular is way lighter and more packable which is why I went with it. FYI I always go with large sleeping bags but still am ok with the regular model of these...

Responded on

If you're most concerned with how it packs then definately go with the regular. Another option would be the Neoair xlite. They pack up so small a lot of times you'll think you forgot your sleeping pad after you pack your bag.

5 5

Great Pad For Backpacking

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This is the lightest comfiest pad that I have used for backpacking. it is very light and it compresses very small which saves you precious room in your pack. It is a little thin, but it is worth it because it is so light and small. If you have trouble sleeping outdoors you may want a thicker pad.

5 5

Therm-a-Rest Prolite Rocks!

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used my Prolite on hundreds of miles of alpine backpacking trips over the past three years. I love this pad. It packs down small (4" diameter x 10" long), it's lightweight (my size regular is 16.4 oz) and it's comfortable. After being compressed and packed all day, this pad really isn't self-inflating** (I'm sure that can be attributed to the lightweight "diamond cut foam"). That's not a problem for me and I'll trade a few puffs of air (to inflate) for weight savings every time. This pad works best fully inflated. I'm a side-sleeper and I've camped on some pretty hard surfaces and I'm always impressed by how comfortable it is. Compressed pad fits well in a Sea to Summit extra small (xs) Ultra-Sil Stuff Sack (0.5 oz).

Pic shows Prolite mated with my Therm-A-Rest Compack Chair (see separate review).

**Note: Pad does self-inflate when left alone for many hours, such as drying out / airing out after a trip. As with all self-inflating-type pads, it should be stored "self-inflated" and flat with the valve open.

Therm-a-Rest Prolite Rocks!

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