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Description

Adventure-worthy.

The Sterling Fusion Nano AT Dry Rope is a vital tool for your alpine touring excursions. When an alpine route finds you face-to-face with a bit of vertical ice, tie in and enjoy full safety ratings comparable to other single ropes designed for full-time sport use.

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Review Summary
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Sterling Fusion Nano AT Dry Rope - 9.2mm

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

Glacier rope

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Great 30M rope! Nice and light. Perfect on the glaciers in the NW.

4 5

great rope.

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Sterling is my go to rope. I love the 9.2s they make. super light and once you use it a few time really supple and doesnt kink.

I'm looking to make a small kit that can...

Posted on

I'm looking to make a small kit that can fit in a small day pack. I was looking for a short 30m dry rope. The rope I normally use is a sterling biathlon pro in 60m. But I only use half of it on the wall I frequent. So the question is how would this rope fair on sport climbs? I was also considering the sterling slim gym but its not dry coated and seems to have the same specs like fall rating.

Best Answer Responded on

This is essentially the same as the Sterling Nano but in a 30m length for glacier and snow travel. It would work fine for sport climbing but you would have to be very careful to keep the length of pitches in mind since you are effectively limited to 15m pitches which are not really all that common. I have used ropes like this when similclimbing on easy terrain or for short rappels while skiing.

5 5

Great All-Around Rope

Nice and lightweight which makes it very versatile. Also the 30m length was perfect for me and my climbing partner to rope together for glacier travel and ski mountaineering.

5 5

Won't leave home without it

Sterling quality, lightweight for a single rope, and availability in 30 meter length make this perfect for taking along on backcountry hikes for unexpected rappels/self rescue. Handles nicely.

Playing around in Wolverine Cirque, Utah

Playing around in Wolverine Cirque, Utah

Posted on

Using a Sterling AT rope. Photo by Tommy Chandler.

Would this 30M rope be appropriate for use...

Posted on

Would this 30M rope be appropriate for use as a lead rope in the gym?

Responded on

I thing you need to buy a "gym" rope...30M can do the job for start

Responded on

This would work depending on how high the wall is you'd be climbing but since it's dry treated it's not really considered a "gym" rope. 30m roughly translates to roughly 98ft.

Responded on

Sorry, I should have elaborated further. I'm thinking about using this rope mostly for leading in the gym (maximum length req 28M) and double duty for ski mountaineering or just having a lightweight rope in the pack for when I run across sketchy terrain and/or conditions outdoors. Thanks to everyone for the previous replies.

Responded on

The length, 30m, would be okay, but I think you'd be better off with a dedicated gym climbing rope as they are meant for the abuse of repeated falls, lowering, etc.. You could probably get away with using this rope in the gym, but at the risk of wearing it out quickly.

Responded on

if you're able to climb outside and have a full 60m rope, just chop the ends off after they're worn out and use that. otherwise, this would work fine.

5 5

Nano 9.2

I've owned a couple dozen climbing ropes over the past 20 years, and this is by far my favorite, especially with the belay device options that are now available to work perfectly with it (Faders Sum and Grigri 2). I abused my old Nano sport climbing for two seasons and it wore as well as any rope I've had. The hand is perfect and the impact soft. I'm not sure why Sterling doesn't use this same weave on more of their ropes. My only caveat is that I weight about 125lbs, and I have seen two Nano's sheathed by climbers in the 175-200lb range on sport routes where the rope ran over an edge that I have never seen do damage to any other rope. I use this AT model as a regular lead rope for short sport routes, and it is the bomb!

What does AT stand for?

Posted on

What does AT stand for?

Best Answer Responded on

Awesome tacos! Just kidding it stands for "Alpine Touring".

5 5

Sexy little beast of a rope

I used this rope in conjunction with a 7.8mm Sterling Photon for glacier travel and ski mountaineering in Antarctica and loved it. Both ropes are fantastic by themselves, but used together you get a huge range of flexibility. You can lead vertical ice/rock with the Nano, cross glaciers and rappel with it. The sheath has a beautiful "hand" to it and it flows easily over snow and through carabiners, yet also ties nice, tight knots. The Nano is a lightweight, but full strength rope. About the only thing you shouldn't do with it is "work" routes or take repeated falls in quick succession, but as a ski mountaineering rope, it is perfect.

Responded on

Andrew,
That sounds like a handy rope system. How did you use the Photon in the system?

Coiling a Nano on the summit.

Coiling a Nano on the summit.

Posted on

I like 30m ropes for ski mountaineering as they are light and easy to deploy. The more you use them, the safer you are.

Sterling Nano for roped skiing

Sterling Nano for roped skiing

Posted on

In this photo, the Sterling Nano is begin used to belay Eric B. on the first descent of Victoria Peak in Antarctica.

Nano for glacier travel

Nano for glacier travel

Posted on

The Sterling Nano in use as a glacier rope in Antarctica. We had five people on a 30m rope which was a bit tight, but it worked OK for the terrain we were in.

Responded on

Unlike climbing where you are mainly relying on the rope in case you fall, with rappelling, you are relying 100% on your gear, so it is very important to learn how to do it correctly. A beginning rock climbing course would be a good place to learn how to do this, or a day with a guide.

4 5

Excellent Rope

I keep this rope in my pack incase I come across sketchy terrain. Sterling makes great ropes and the price is reasonable as well.