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Description

Welcome to your new home.

Whether you're setting up camp in the middle of the wilderness or at a campsite, the Sierra Designs Flash 2 Tent brings the luxury without a bunch of added weight. This tent's unique hybrid-wall construction blends the benefits of both double-wall and single-wall constructions so you get a tent that's light like a single-wall but still weather-protective like a double-wall. This innovative design also helps you set the tent up quickly in bad weather, and it gives more space than most backpacking tents without any added weight. In fact, both doors are wide enough for you and your buddy to sit side by side and cook some food or enjoy the view when the weather's too harsh for you to explore the outdoors. The gear closets also have enough room for multiple backpacks and several pairs of shoes, and Sierra Designs placed each closet perpendicular to the doors so you don't have to climb over all your gear to get in and out.

Sierra Designs built this tent's fly out of polyester taffeta to keep it superlight, the body out of mesh for ventilation, and the floor out of nylon taffeta for durability. There are two DAC Pressfit poles that are incredibly light and surprisingly strong, and the 15-in integrated awning poles maximize the tent's space without adding the weight of another support pole. Whether you're hiking through Grand Canyon or simply camping at one of the sites in the Tetons, this tent makes an excellent companion.

  • Hybrid wall construction
  • Nylon no-see-um mesh body
  • Nylon taffeta floor
  • Polyester taffeta fly
  • Two DAC Pressfit poles, 15-inch integrated awning poles
  • Two large drop doors with awnings
  • Two gear closets
  • Fits two people

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Sierra Designs Flash 2 Tent: 2-Person 3-Season

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Here's what others have to say...

3 5

Mixed Emotions

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We went on a week long trip to Colorado to climb with CAMP USA and fellow Expert Gearhead Bill and I spent the week in this tent. Each day we had to break it down and put it up as we jumped camp site to camp site around Colorado.

Assembling:
Putting this tent together isn't that hard. The nice thing about it is the rain fly and the tent body are sewn together as one.

Poles:
The poles are just one giant part. Not the coolest thing for breaking down and a little cumbersome for assembling because when flat the poles are a bit long.

Breaking Down:
Removing the poles from the tent were easy but folding the tent pole was a bit of a pain because of how big it was. The other big pain is that on the rain fly portion near the top of each door is a 12 inch or so metal rod that you need to fold up just right (like origami) in order to get the entire tent to fit into the stuff sack just right. If not folded properly and the metal rods are not inline with how to put them into the stuff sack, you'll need to unfold the tent body and refold it. Major short coming in their design.

Interior Space:
The room in the tent was awesome. We had plenty of room and didn't feel cramped at all. The head space was great and sitting up and moving around was not an issue at all.

Staking:
The hands down biggest thing I was not a fan of with this tent is that it relies on tension more so than other tents. The tent *MUST* be stakes in order for it to be tensioned properly. I personally don't always stake a tent or guy out the lines because I may be sleeping on rock and don't have the ability to. This is a tent I couldn't use on rock, a hard floor, a wooden platform at a tent site, etc. So that is why this tent doesn't work for me.

Shoot me an email if you have any questions about this tent or any other gear!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Mixed Emotions
Responded on

Other than the issues with staking the tent (there are many, many options to secure a tent without stakes - using rocks in the place of stakes is one) how did the tent actually perform during your trip? Did it perform well in the wind? Were there any issues with condensation? What were the wind/temperature/weather conditions during your trip? Did the gear closets perform well for your needs? Providing information like this would really elevate your review and help a potential buyer.

Responded on

David,

Thanks for your questions, I opted to leave a few things out otherwise it'd have turned into a dissertation on the tent.

For my uses, the staking feature of this tent still wouldn't work with other methods. If I used rocks, I'd need to hope the area I was going had rocks that were heavy enough to support the tension of the tent.

There were no condensation issues and we didn't have any wind since we were in well protected areas with lots of trees each night.

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Tent at Our Site

Tent at Our Site

Shoot me an email if you have any questions about this tent or any other gear!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

View from the Tent

View from the Tent

Shoot me an email if you have any questions about this tent or any other gear!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Inside the Tent

Inside the Tent

Shoot me an email if you have any questions about this tent or any other gear!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Detail Shot

Detail Shot

Shoot me an email if you have any questions about this tent or any other gear!

Jared D.
Expert Gearhead
801.736.4336
jdowns@backcountry.com

Fun Blue Tent

Fun Blue Tent

Flash 2 setup at Caspers Regional Park with Adventure Guides. Great shelter for two!

4 5

doors, vestibules, and rain

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

The one thing you can't tell from the video below, is that you can't cover the screen on the doors all the way. The flap that covers the screen comes up to about 2 inches below the top. I think this is a little weird, but it does seem adequate to give you privacy. Since the awning hangs down a little, someone would have to stick their head under to really see in.
Since the vestibules are at the short ends, they are much smaller than I'm used to. I also have to pass my shoes through the tent to get them to the vestibule, but it works.
I was looking for a tent that would allow better cross-ventilation and still protect from the rain, and it works well for that. It rained the first time I used it, and I stayed dry.
Set-up is a little different, too, with the 3 main poles already connected. And you can't simply stuff it in the sack because of the integrated awning poles, but they are short, so it's not much of a hassle. Overall, it seems like a great tent so far!