Just like a surfer can't ride without a board and an angler can't fish without a rod, you can't attack whitewater or survive an open-ocean squall without your paddle. Attach the Sea To Summit Paddle Leash to your propulsion device (or fishing rod) and you won't be left stranded.
  • Strong hook-and-loop closure secures to the shaft of your paddle (or rod handle) and a pass-thru loop on the opposing end attaches the leash to your boat
  • Nylon webbing-wrapped inner stretch cord allows you to paddle (or cast) without restriction

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Sea To Summit Paddle Leash

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Here's what others have to say...

I used a surf board leash, attached kayak...

I used a surf board leash, attached kayak to paddle, for 15 years, in2-4 foot surf, only one snap. I had the strength to hold and never lost the kayak on a wipe out. How will this hold up?

Best Answer Responded on

Hey Bill,
The way you've written your question, it sounds like you're trying to stay with your boat rather than keep your paddle. A paddle leash is meant to keep the paddle with you in a wipe out. If that is the case, and you are trying to keep your paddle with you rather than your boat, this will definitely get the job done. Now if you're trying to stay tethered to your boat, that's not the intended purpose of this piece, and while it might work, I wouldn't bet on it.

Any raft guides out there use this? How...

Any raft guides out there use this? How long is the leash? Would it get in the way of a big draw-stroke?

Best Answer Responded on

Hiya David,

You are unlikely to ever see a whitewater rafting guide using a paddle leash. It's far too dangerous to have the paddle attached to your arm in a moment of crisis-- it's extra stuff to get tangled up in-- you need to be able to set your paddle down to use a throwbag, for example-- and you need to be able to flip the paddle around to T-grip a guest who's just fallen in and is still within arm's reach. In a flip, it's imperative that you be able to let go of the paddle if needed.

(Any guide worth their salt would tell you that you simply need to train yourself to hang onto the paddle anyway-- that's what flip drills are for!)

It's gonna depend on how heroic your drawstrokes are, but you should still be able to complete a draw with the leash attached, though I personally would advise against it.

The leash is made from a length of stretchy nylon that is 3 feet without any tension. According to Sea to Summit, it can be stretched up to 7 feet, but I think that'd be pushing it.

If you have any other questions about rafting, guiding, or paddle-related gear at all, feel free to hit me up. I'm cooped up in the office for the summer instead of working on the river, and I'd love to live vicariously through your adventures!

800.409.4502 ext 4456 or llabar@backcountry.com

5 5

Does whats its supposed to

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

The leash holds solid the paddle with the velcro and it has a perfect length. For me the perfect length means : not too long to get in my way when going out of the kayak, long enough for me to put the paddle in the seating area.

5 5

It works

It's just a leash so don't expect anything super special. I like it a lot, the fit is pretty secure and easy to take on and off. I especially like how it doesn't tend to get tangled. Good leash.