Description

Low weight no longer means a compromise in performance.

From the French Alps to the Wasatch, lace up the Scarpa Men's Charmoz Pro GTX Mountaineering Boot and cover steep alpine terrain with confidence. The Gore-Tex Performance Comfort Lining guarantees waterproof and breathable protection while the lightweight synthetic L-Tech upper provides durability suited to the most rugged terrain. The boot is compatible with semi-automatic crampons and includes a full rubber rand for solid climbing performance on technical rock.

  • Gore-Tex Performance Comfort lining provides guaranteed waterproof and breathable protection
  • Synthetic L-Tech upper with Lorica reinforcement provides mountain-tough durability while keeping weight to a minimum
  • Pro-Fiber insole supplies comfort and generous support
  • Low-profile lacing gives you a secure fit and reduces snags
  • Dual-Density Microporous EVA midsole absorbs the shock of rugged terrain
  • Articulated Tri-Flex ankle enhances agility while you navigate technical trail sections
  • Boot weighs in at just a pound and a half, reducing fatigue over long distances
  • Full rubber rand with a friction zone improves climbing performance on steep rock
  • Compatible with semi-automatic and universal crampons
  • Vibram Mulaz outsole with an aggressive lug pattern ensures confident traction

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Scarpa Charmoz Pro GTX Mountaineering Boot - Men's

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

Great Boots!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

As I have extremely wide feet I was worried when I ordered that they wouldn't have fit and had to send them back from Aus. To my surprise they were a perfect fit (with thin wool socks).

I got these for a trip of Japan where I would be hiking through snow, steep terrain, rivers and mud. As well as using them in Aus for backcountry snowboarding.

They handle great on snow even without crampons (although better with them!). Super comfortable - I mean they have to be one of the most comfortable pairs of shoes I've ever owned.

Saved me more than once on some hikes, the ankle protection is great.
Walked through rivers with the water well above the boot and somehow my feet always remain completely dry!

One thing that might bother some people is the metal shank through the sole. It will make your feet somewhat sore if you are hiking/climbing in them all day.

These boots exceeded all my expectations by far and after months of use they still look "as new".. what more could you want!?

My buddy and I are climbing Rainier in...

My buddy and I are climbing Rainier in July. Would these boots be a good choice? I love their weight for the approach; but my fear is that my feet will get cold. According to Summit Post, the average low on the summit in July is 15 degrees. If it is below average, with wind, etc.... am I in trouble? Or is this boot just right?

Best Answer Responded on

EmpireForest,

Awesome choice of time to climb Rainier and this should work if you don't ever have problems with cold feet easily. I've used a similar boot the old LaSportiva Trango GTX and my feet stayed nice a toasty. Did have one time 2 years ago when we were caught by a storm at the summit with high winds and wind chill of 10 below and wished I'd had warmer boots or a good insole. The boots I now have are the Trango Extreme Evo Light GTX and haven't had a problem on any of the PNW glaciers and peaks. http://www.backcountry.com/la-sportiva-trango-extreme-evo-light-gtx-mens They are the Cadillac of all mountaineering boots I've ever owned and worth it!

Enjoy your upcoming attempt!!

Scooter

4 5

Charmoz for lightweight mountain boots

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: True to size

The perfect boot where you know you're going to spend significant time in crampons but aren't going to do a ton of front pointing and it's not going to get too cold. They climb rock surprisingly well and are incredibly light weight. The footbed felt a bit flat to me but adding a greet superfeet insole dialed in the fit perfectly. The ankle flexes quite freely so it's easy to use french technique on relatively steep slopes. However, that same flexibility results in tired calves if you're front pointing all day. The fact that this boot doesn't have a full length shaft also reduces its front pointing ability. However, the rockered and more flexible toe means you can walk all day in this boot without issue. I wore it 10 days straight in technical terrain after very little break in and never noticed any discomfort. The use of kevlar reduces weight and durability but mine keep on kickin. It has limitations like anything else but its a great boot if you use it properly!

Responded on

Its a decent low budget option, but if you are going to do a lot of ice climbing (or any front pointing) maybe invest in something with a full shank instead of this ones 3/4 shank

Responded on

I'm planning on doing Mt. Rainier this coming early May. With a good thick expedition weight sock, could this boot work fine? I know most of the guide companies use double boots but I feel that's a little overkill. What are your thoughts. Though these aren't insulated do these provide any warmth whatsoever?

Responded on

I'd want something heavier than the Charmoz that early on Rainier. I've used Triolets, which are similar, in April/May in the Cascades and my feet got cold. Not like frostnip/frostbite cold, but enough to be annoying. YMMV, but I just wouldn't want to worry about trying to keep my feet warm.

Responded on

Definitely not the best for vertical ice climbing. Could be downright frustrating. Certainly tiring. You can get by with this boot and a hybrid crampon but you will have a much better time with a fully rigid boot with more ankle support. Agreed it's a bit risky to take this boot up rainier in May. Certainly a comfortable option if you're choosing one of the lower angle routes like the DC. Might get away with it if you're moving fast and know how to keep your feet warm. Most prefer at least an insulted single boot like the Nepal. The Charmoz on a guided trip? Forget it. Too much waiting around and moving slow. For both questions (ice climbing and Rainier in May) I would take my Nepals. Lots of people loving the integrated gaiter boots these days like the batura or phantom series.

5 5

Scarpa Charmoz pro GTX

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
  • Fit: True to size

I must say I'm very impressed with this boot.
I already have the Triolet Pro GTX and bought the Charmoz based on the earlier experience.
Straight from the box I took the Charmoz on a 13.5km (8.4 mile) hike in the Australian bush. This was over fire trails and bush tracks (over tree roots and rock).
This is not what these boots are designed for, but believe me, if they can handle that then they're going to be fantastic for what I bought them for, via ferratas in the Dolomites and use on climbs in the European Alps.
I had one hot spot ( same as for the Triolet) but I can get those in well-worn shoes.
This was a very favourable first outing.

4 5

Scarpa Gtx Pro boot

I have had these boots for a few months and have been pleased so far. They have a nice balance of comfort and weight to accommodate for long trips. I would recommend them to a friend. A very versatile boot.