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  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Blizzard Zero G 108 Ski

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    Blizzard Zero G 108 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    DPS Wailer 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

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    DPS Wailer 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Dynastar Mythic Ski

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    Dynastar Mythic Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Salomon MTN Lab Ski

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    Salomon MTN Lab Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Armada Invictus 95 Ti Ski

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    Armada Invictus 95 Ti Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Black Diamond Boundary 107 Ski

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    Black Diamond Boundary 10 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Blizzard Cochise Ski

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    Blizzard Cochise Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Fischer Ranger 106 Ti Ski

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    Fischer Ranger 106 Ti Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    K2 Pinnacle 105 Ski

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    K2 Pinnacle 105 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Kastle BMX 105 Ski

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    Kastle BMX 105 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    4FRNT Kye 110 Ski

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    4FRNT Kye 110 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Black Diamond Boundary 115 Ski

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    Black Diamond Boundary 115 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Dynafit Hokkaido Ski

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    Dynafit Hokkaido Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Folsom Primary Ski

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    Folsom Primary Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Nordica Enforcer Ski

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    Nordica Enforcer Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Volkl 100Eight Ski

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    Volkl 100Eight Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Women’s Blizzard Sheeva Ski

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    Women’s Blizzard Sheeva Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Women’s DPS Yvette 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

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    Women’s DPS Yvette 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Women’s Fischer Ranger 98 Ski

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    Women’s Fischer Ranger 98 Ski
  • The 2016 Ski Showcase

    Women’s Volkl 100Eight Ski

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    Women’s Volkl 100Eight Ski
  • Blizzard

    Zero G 108 Ski

    Blizzard Zero G 108 Ski
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  • DPS

    Wailer 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

    DPS Wailer 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski
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  • Dynastar

    Mythic Ski

    Dynastar Mythic Ski
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  • Salomon

    MTN Lab Ski

    Salomon MTN Lab Ski
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  • Armada

    Invictus 95 Ti Ski

    Armada Invictus 95 Ti Ski
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  • Black Diamond

    Boundary 107 Ski

    Black Diamond Boundary 107 Ski
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  • Blizzard

    Cochise Ski

    Blizzard Cochise Ski
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  • Fischer

    Ranger 108 Ti Ski

    Fischer Ranger 108 Ti Ski
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  • K2

    Pinnacle Ski

    K2 Pinnacle 105 Ski
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  • Kastle

    BMX 105 Ski

    Kastle BMX 105 Ski
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  • 4FRNT

    Kye 110 Ski

    4FRNT Kye 110 Ski
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  • Black Diamond

    Boundary 115 Ski

    Black Diamond Boundary 115 Ski
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  • Dynafit

    Hokkaido Ski

    Dynafit Hokkaido Ski
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  • Folsom

    Primary Ski

    Folsom Primary Ski
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  • Nordica

    Enforcer Ski

    Nordica Enforcer Ski
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  • Volkl

    100Eight Ski

    Volkl 100Eight Ski
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  • Blizzard

    Sheeva Ski

    Women’s Blizzard Sheeva Ski
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  • DPS

    Yvette 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

    Women’s DPS Yvette 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski
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  • Fischer

    Ranger 98

    Women’s Fischer Ranger 98 Ski
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  • Volkl

    100Eight Ski

    Women’s Volkl 100Eight Ski
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Armada Invictus 95 Ti Ski

Armada says the Invictus is like “water flowing over rocks,” meaning that it has the ability to adapt to any type of terrain—from icy hardpack to powdery tree lines. Dual layers of titanium, carbon and KEVLAR® stringers, and the AR Noserocker make it possible.

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Overall Rating

“Titanium definitely brings a good edge grip, but doesn't make the ski overly unwieldy. It can push you out of your comfort zone yet it won't punish you for small mistakes.”

Wally, Expert Gearhead

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

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Black Diamond Boundary 107 Ski

The most playful ski in the Black Diamond lineup, the Boundary 107 is your ticket to ultimate fun in the soft stuff. Designed by blending the most popular features of Black Diamond’s bestselling skis, this is an easy-turning, pow-surfing machine.

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Overall Rating

“This ski felt great; super stable at high speeds and through crud, yet surprisingly playful. I would love to ski this in deep snow, but overall it's a pretty rad all-mountain ski.”

Taylor, Senior Visual Merchandiser

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All All Mountain Skis

Blizzard Cochise Ski

The Cochise has garnered a cult following in recent years and for good reason. The versatile dimensions, rocker-camber-rocker profile, and inimitable Blizzard feel have made the Cochise the ultimate daily-driver ski.

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Overall Rating

“You can go to town on this one! Stable charger, responsive, and torsionally stiff to carve all day long. Cuts thru the crud nicely, and is wide enough to float well in deeper snow.”

Leigh, Visual Marketing Program Manager

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All All Mountain Skis

Fischer Ranger 108 Ti Ski

From fresh groomers at the resort to a full day of backcountry touring, the new Ranger 108 keeps you in charge. The carbon nose keeps it super light, the beefy construction underfoot keeps it stiff and stable, and the tip and tail rocker keep the ride smooth and surfy. Enjoy endless possibilities both inbounds and out.

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Overall Rating

“These skis rip! They roll over edge to edge super smooth. The carbon tips are solid crud-busters and their shape lets you confidently charge in variable conditions.”

Pete, Videographer & Editor

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All All Mountain Skis

K2 Pinnacle 105 Ski

K2 has billed the Pinnacle 105 as the “do-anything, go-anywhere, ski-everything, quiver of one.” The innovative Nanolite core makes the ski easy and intuitive to turn, regardless of the conditions.

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Overall Rating

“One of the best weight-to-edge hold ratios when it comes to groomers or soft snow generally. Very playful and pivots over easily to the new turn. Doesn't like hard chop, so you need to rein in the speed a bit there. Best sweet spot first impression in a while.”

Wally, Expert Gearhead

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All All Mountain Skis

Kastle BMX 105 Ski

Boasting peerless construction, and ease of turn intiation that will make you feel like you’re cheating Kastle’s BMX 105 Ski caters to the skier who accepts no compromise. The BMX 105’s early-rise, tapered tips rise up over pow and variable conditions, while the titanal reinforcement ensures tenacity on the hardest snow conditions. Don’t let the ease of use fool you—the BMX is stiff, stable, and wants to go fast.

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Overall Rating

“Super lively ski, really quick turn initiation and a powerful tail. It was quiet and smooth as butter on the groomed trails, although I noticed a bit of chatter in the tips when I took them into some rough snow.”

Taylor, Senior Visual Merchandise

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other All Mountain Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All All Mountain Skis

4FRNT Kye 110 Ski

The newest addition to the 4FRNT collection of big mountain skis, the Kye is an exceptionally stable quiver of one. It’s fat enough to surf pow, cambered enough to bite the hardpack, and stiff enough to keep you confident on the most grisly of big mountain descents.

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Overall Rating

“This ski is definitely not for timid or slow skiers; it needs to be driven hard, and at speed. It wants to point it, and in fact needs speed to get on edge.”

Lexi, Marketing Copywriter

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Powder Skis

Black Diamond Boundary 115 Ski

On those special days when you wake and discover snowfall of epic proportions, reach for the Boundary 115. The fat dimensions, rockered tip and tail, and hybrid shape are all geared towards maximum float in bottomless snow.

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Overall Rating

“This is a softer and rockered ski that definitely benefits from a more playful technique with a lot of pivot from the beginning of the turn. Soft snow makes this ski sing, but it can get shaken at speed in hard chop or groomed snow.”

Wally, Expert Gearhead

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Powder Skis

Dynafit Hokkaido Ski

Dynafit’s premier free-touring ski, the Hokkaido was built for big lines and surfing deep snow far from the beaten path. The sidewall construction is ideal for edging on steep terrain, and the Carbon Space Frame at the tip acts like a shock absorber when you run into variable snow.

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Overall Rating

“Dynafit's first resort ski definitely likes mid- to longer-radius turns and is plenty damp at speed. Short turns and slow turns come with a bit of patience and strength. The lack of positive camber gives it good float in deep, soft snow.”

Wally, Expert Gearhead

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Powder Skis

Folsom Primary Ski

Positioned as the quiver-killer for skiers in the West, Folsom’s Primary Ski combines a full rocker profile with a maple, polar, and bamboo core—the result is a charge-worthy ski that is also light enough for touring. If you don’t like your skiing to be painted into a corner, the Primary is the right color for you.

Shop Now >

Overall Rating

“Super fun ski, really playful and pivoty; doesn't carve great but can hold an edge when you need it to.”

Bill, Expert Gearhead

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Powder Skis

Nordica Enforcer Ski

A freeride shape meets a powerful, World-Cup-inspired construction for maximum torsional stability and edge grip. With the innovative camRock profile, you can now take all that power to big, powdery, off-piste lines.

Shop Now >

Overall Rating

“Really stable, and a charger that loves to go fast. A bit stiff, but you definitely get back what you put into it.”

Leigh, Visual Marketing Program Manager

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Powder Skis

Volkl 100Eight Ski

A great ski should feel like a natural extension of your body, enhancing your agility and confidence. With the new 3D Ridge construction, full rocker shape, and early taper, the 100Eight does just that.

Shop Now >

Overall Rating

“Very stable, surprisingly stiff considering its light weight. Holds a great edge.”

Jonny, Brand Manager

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

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Women’s Blizzard Sheeva Ski

Whether it’s groomers, crud, powder, icy hardpack, or spring slush, the Sheeva slays it all. This ski is guaranteed to put a smile on your face every day of the season.

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Overall Rating

“Ripping all-purpose-all-mountain ski. A bit longer turn radius than most women's skis makes for fun GS turns. Equally fun through choppy snow, and enough of a stable and damp platform to handle icy bumps. The early rise tip makes them extra maneuverable, as well as versatile for pow days.”

Re, Managing Editor of Photography

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Women's Powder Ski Favorites

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Women’s DPS Yvette 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

Make no mistake, the Yvette isn’t a watered-down version of a men’s ski. It's built with the groundbreaking Pure 3 construction that uses aerospace carbon and nanotech technology to create a ski that’s 30% lighter yet also 30% stiffer, stronger, and more powerful. This ski is built for women looking to attack all conditions with unyielding confidence.

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Overall Rating

“If you want only one-ski quiver, this is a good option. It was solid in variable conditions and with super lightweight construction that didn't tire out my legs. This ski was confidence-inspiring and reliable; couldn't find its speed limit! Not super poppy but solid on takeoffs and landings. The snowphobic top sheets did actually seem to work, shedding snow, which was cool.”

Lexi, Marketing Copywriter

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Women's Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Lisa Edlund.

E-Mail Lisa
Shop All Women's Powder Skis

Women’s Fischer Ranger 98 Ski

You no longer have to choose between low weight and stability—with the Ranger you get it all. It rips hardpack, hammers through crud, surfs powder, and keeps up in the skin track—just point it and go.

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Overall Rating

“Love! After three days demoing and these are still my favorite. They're lively and effortless to transition between turns, and super versatile. They're also confidence-inspiring―I have no fear venturing off piste into chunder or chop. Carbon makes for such a damp, rock-solid platform, but this ski still maintains its liveliness and it's so fun on airs and drops.”

Lexi, Marketing Copywriter

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Women's Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Lisa Edlund.

E-Mail Lisa
Shop All Women's Powder Skis

Women’s Volkl 100Eight Ski

The 100Eight is built with Volkl’s new 3D Ridge construction, a layup designed to make you feel more agile and confident on the snow than ever before. The 100Eight delivers on everything from spring season groomers to powder days off-piste.

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Overall Rating

“Light ski, nice swing weight. Definitely best in a pow, soft corn, mashed potatoes, or maybe perfect corduroy. Not suitable for harder conditions, hard ice, icy bumps, etc. Has a nice even feeling through the turn.”

Re, Managing Editor of Photography

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Women's Powder Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Lisa Edlund.

E-Mail Lisa
Shop All Women's Powder Skis

Blizzard Zero G 108 Ski

The Zero G is bringing a new level of downhill performance to the world of lightweight touring skis. Its carbon fiber frame and ultra-light paulownia wood core keep the weight to just over three pounds per ski while the healthy width underfoot provides ample float in untracked snow.

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Overall Rating

“A poppy, playful ski, light and and maneuverable. But they're stable for how light they are; less chattery than other carbon options.”

Jay, Buyer

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Alpine Touring Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Alpine Touring Skis

DPS Wailer 112RP2 Pure 3 Ski

DPS is committed to the perfect powder turn like no other brand, and the revamped Wailer 112 maintains that narrative—while also ripping the crud and hardpack you’ll encounter between storms. The Pure 3 build gives it both lightness and power, and the Paddle Tech sidecut blends the contact points for an incredibly smooth and natural turn shape.

Shop Now >

Overall Rating

“Light and springy, but with some tip chatter at speed. Definitely a soft-snow ski.”

Eli, Ski Buyer

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Alpine Touring Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Alpine Touring Skis

Dynastar Mythic Ski

Inspired by the technical terrain of Chamonix, the Mythic blends freeride elements with an ultra-light carbon-infused core. The result is a ski mountaineering tool with more downhill performance than you ever dreamed possible.

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Overall Rating

“Quite stiff but very responsive; slow to turn edge to edge on short-radius turns, but super solid on big GS turns. It's not really poppy, but can handle an air with a solid landing. It's very light for its size with great swing weight, thanks to the carbon construction.”

Lexi, Marketing Copywriter

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Alpine Touring Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Alpine Touring Skis

Salomon MTN Lab Ski

Light enough for backcountry missions yet mean enough for big days at the resort, the MTN Lab is the pinnacle of versatility. A wide 114mm waist with Honeycomb Tip technology delivers the necessary float for deep days.

Shop Now >

Overall Rating

Profile

Turning Radius

Rating Breakdown

Stability

Stability refers to a ski’s structural integrity, and how the ski interacts with the snow’s surface at different speeds and snow conditions. A stiffer flex the ski will generally provide stability at speed and on variable terrain. Big mountain skis benefit from lots of stability for high speeds, while park and freestyle skis benefit from reduced stability to create a more playful ski.

Float

Float refers to a ski’s ability to plane over powder and other soft-snow conditions. Waist width and rockered profiles are hallmarks of float, and floatation is most important for powder, and all-mountain skis. Shovel shape and profile will also impact flotation—wider shovels with more rocker generally means more float.

Maneuverability

Maneuverability refers to a ski’s agility, ease of turn initiation, and the ability to link turns regardless of snow conditions. Rocker profile in a powder ski increases maneuverability in deep snow, and similarly, narrow waist width and shorter sidecuts increase maneuverability on hard or groomed snow conditions. Also, longer skis like powder and big mountain skis will be less maneuverable, but much more stable.

Carve-ability

Carve refers to a ski’s ability to hold an edge at speed. All-mountain and park skis’ narrow waist widths and short sidecuts are designed excel at carving on groomed conditions, whereas rockered profiles and long-sidecut shapes are aimed at floating. If you spend time on the groomers, you’ll want a ski with plenty of carve-ability. If skiing big lines is your game, aim for longer sidecuts for bigger, freeride turns.

Other Alpine Touring Ski Favorites

Have Questions About Skis?

Get personalized one-on-one advice from our ski expert, Bill Porreca.

E-Mail Bill
Shop All Alpine Touring Skis