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Description

Monster stiffness and uphill quickness.

The Salomon Quest Max 130 Alpine Touring Boot is no soft taco. This boot means business, just like you do when you're in the backcountry. You like to climb high and get the goods, but that doesn't mean you're a pushover on the downhill. This boot has a burly 130 flex index for big, strong skiers who crush lesser boots. This boot uses TwinFrame technology and a customizable 360-degree PU shell for strength and flex right where you need it. This smart design keeps the weight down for agile uphill hikes. An oversized pivot distributes the pressure from edge to edge and toe to heel over your fat pow skis for optimal performance. 

The My CustomFit Race liner is thermomoldable and delivers allover power, comfort, and efficiency, and 98-millimeter last keeps the fit precise. A waterproof gusset adds comfy protection, and a wide power strap adds support and security. Hike and Ride technology features a magnesium Backbone that locks you down for screaming descents and lets loose for mobile hikes. An extended rubber sole gives you grip when boot-packing.

This is the stiffest boot in the Salomon Quest Max series.

  • Twinframe technology
  • 360-degree heat-customizable PU World Cup shell
  • My Custom Fit Race thermoformable liner
  • Hike and Ride technology
  • 24-millimeter oversized pivot
  • Dismantle insert screw
  • Super-stiff 120 flex index
  • 98-millimeter last
  • Magnesium Backbone release
  • Waterproof gusset
  • 50-millimeter power strap
  • Three buckles
  • Contagrip Extended rubber sole
  • Interchangeable bi-material alpine pads

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Salomon Quest Max 130 Alpine Touring Boot

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

Comfortable and smooth flex!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This has been a great boot. I purchased from Backcountry.com. I broke this boot in the old fashioned way instead of a heat mold. That equated to a day of discomfort. I really like the smooth consistent flex of the boot. The boot was a little sloppy in the cuff, so I chose to remove the stock power strap and install a 3 layer Booster Strap. Once installed, the boot was amazing. The contra grip sole is outstanding. This isn't a true touring boot, but the Hike/Ride does make life easier in the side country. Overall a great boot that offers comfort without sacrificing performance.

I have got Rossiglol Axial 120 bindings....

Posted on

I have got Rossiglol Axial 120 bindings. Can you tell me if those Salomon quest max 130 alpine touring will work with that?

Responded on

Yes if you are using the Alpine soles on these that will work.

5 5

Killer Boots Man

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

These boots are bomber. They are not as light as other boots but they get the job done when it needs to be done. Changeable toe and heal to switch soles. Heard a rumor of salomon making a tech toe and heal piece. Stiff enough to rip this boot everywhere. Super cozy and dry.

5 5

Go To, Get it Done

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Spent a good chunk of my winter in this boot both in the backcountry and near/on Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. Sturdy, Stiff, and reliable. Great for climbing, great for skiing. This is a powerful boot for the backcountry where you don't have to sacrifice comfort for performance. Felt like I could enjoy solid, great turns but also tour to objectives with good, flexible movement. Spent long days and many cold hours in the Quest Max 130 and it did me well.

Approaching a route in GTNP

Approaching a route in GTNP

Posted on

Climbing up to ski down in the Quest Max 130 in Grand Teton National park. photo credit: Fred Marmsater

Responded on

Looks as if you were to slip and fall that things could have been pretty ugly.Iam very interested in backcountry skiing .I don't want to die in the backcountry trying to have fun.How does a person become wise to being safe in the backcountry? After paying 100+ to ski Vail and having it skied out by 11am. -I thought backcountry seems to be a good option to escaping that type of over priced (for me)skiing.Iam a blue collar middle class American that lives in ND and loves to ski not a white collar condo timeshare morning powder cruising .CEO .How do I become wise about backcountry without endangering myself and my son within reason .There will always be risk even for you but to minimize that ?what are the best ways to learn those skills? thanks

Responded on

Hey monte marinucci,
Everyone seems to be wanting to go backcountry these days! Its fun and it is great.

However, danger lurks at every corner. At the resorts, ski patrol will pack down powder in certain parts of the resort to give it a better base later in the season. Backcountry you are dealing with mother nature. In my opinion, there is really no safe and true way to do backcountry. there are precautions you can take to try to minimize these things but thats it. When I took my Avi1 course, it was agreed that you are learning enough just to get yourself killed.

With that being said, I would recommend taking a avi1 course. I took mine at Crested Butte at the avalanche center. its a 2 day course that really helped me. first day is class work and getting out there a little bit. at the end of the first day you plan a trip for the next day with your group. What I liked about taking a class there is the instructors were very knowledgeable and there is a shop that rents out backcountry gear! Above all, just take a course!

Responded on

Sorry for the delayed response. I would agree with a lot of the comments on here. Taking avalanche courses is a good start along with hiring a guide for your first few adventures. Finding knowledgeable locals can also work but a guide is your best, safest bet to learn the basics. Hope that helps! Kim

Rocking the Quest 130 in GTNP

Rocking the Quest 130 in GTNP

Posted on

Rapping into Broken Branch couloir in Grand Teton National Park

Responded on

Marinucci,

As Topp stated take an Avi course... I personally would do it twice in tow different areas during two different times of the season. This will allow you to have more hands on experience with different snow packs... taking one is never enough. I'd also take a wilderness first aid course... not trying to scare ya off... I've been in the side country and back country for 25_ years and while 99% has been blissful I've also set a few bones. Take a course or two.. they will also be a great experience for you and your son. Then I'd hire a guide for a moderate trip or two... ask a million questions, take not of everything then try the same trips without the guide... After all that you'll know enough to get your selves killed... but you'll also have a good feeling for the inherent risk and how to mitigate it... Safe Travels!

is the quest line compatible with alpine...

Posted on

is the quest line compatible with alpine bindings such as Marker Jester or Look pivot

Responded on

Yes these will work with Alpine bindings like the Pivot or the Jester with the supplied Alpine soles.