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Description

Premium speed without the surprise ice bath.

If you're in love with the Ridley Noah, but haven't found a buyer for that kidney you've been trying to sell, the Noah RS may be the best of both worlds –you get to ride a Noah, and keep all your organs. A mere half-step below the flagship Noah, the RS forgoes the integrated seat mast for an aero seatpost, and swaps the Noah's SRAM Red components for Force, but maintains the overall frame design and aerodynamic performance.

  • R-Flow jet foils on the fork draws air away from the most turbulent part of the bike –the spokes –and reduce drag by nearly six and a half percent
  • SRAM Force gruppo provides precise, consistent, and intuitive shifting with its patented DoubleTap technology
  • Stiff rear stays ensure all your power is transferred through the drivetrain and translates directly into speed
  • Deda cockpit components are light, stiff, and durable for years and years of dependable performance
  • Fulcrum Racing 5 wheels are light enough to race on, and strong enough for everyday rides
  • Standard road double paired with a 12-25-tooth cassette provides a nice mix of low gear torque and top-end speed

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4 5

Fast, Fast, Fast.

Ridley Noah RS, SRAM Force Group, Fulcrum 5 wheels, Deda bars, Stem & Post.

Overview

The Noah RS uses a 30-and 24-ton high modulus carbon fiber, just a step below the 50, 40 & 30 high-modulus carbon found on the flagship Noah—but with a healthy jump down in price. Coming in at around 1200 grams, the RS isn’t the lightest frame available, but what it lacks in the weight-weenie category, the RS makes up for in aerodynamics and stiffness—two characteristics Ridley has invested heavily into improving.

Over the past decade bottom bracket shells have been getting progressively larger, minimizing bottom bracket flex in many of today’s machines. But with the Ridley RS this isn’t just hype, it’s actually a defining feature. Bottom bracket stiffness during an out-of-the-saddle climb or a hammering sprint is unmatched, period. Hard as we tried, we couldn’t get the RS to play the middle-man when it came to power-transfer; energy went straight to the wheels without passing go.

Ridley tackled lateral flex through the oversized head & down tube, and continued all the way through the front end by adding the 4ZA Sphinx full-carbon fork. The combination of oversized tubing and the 4ZA Sphinx Fork eliminates any hint of sloppiness in the front end. Take your hands off the bars at 30mph and the RS tracks straight and true without wanting to wander or wobble—important when it’s time to sit up and don a windbreaker for the descent.

Cornering on the RS was confident and smooth. Diving through corners the RS didn’t flinch, and although it shares the same 970 cm wheelbase as the Damocles and Excalibur, the RS just feels quicker.

One complaint about the RS is that ride quality was almost too good. Smooth and nimble sometimes bordered on muffled, eliminating some of the Euro-sportscar-esque feel that defines a race machine. But, if you’re more of a high-powered sedan person, it might be right up your alley.

Aerodynamics.
To say Ridley researched aerodynamics would be an understatement. Every curve on the Noah RS is tuned to reduce drag—even down to the R-Surface paint. The 4ZA Sphinx fork uses Ridley’s patented R-Flow Jet foils; slotted airfoils on the fork blades draw air away from the spokes and reduce drag by up to 6.4%. Internally routed cables and a teardrop-shaped carbon seat post keep the RS sleek and slender while adding to Ridley’s focus on aerodynamics.
But can you feel the difference? Without a doubt the RS feels fast, whether you attribute fast to the aerodynamics, nimble handling or what you ate for breakfast it doesn’t really matter. Numbers don’t lie, and the with the rigorous wind-tunnel tests Ridley has performed, the numbers are there. So whatever the reason, fast is fast, period.

Group.
Groupsets are personal choice, and as someone who isn’t a DoubleTap user, the SRAM Force gruppo took a bit of getting used to. Shifting was relatively smooth, but lacked the confident clicks found in a comparable Shimano or Campy group. The Force hoods were fairly comfortable, and access to the controls is quick and easy.

Wheels.
Fulcrum 5 hoops are stock on the Noah RS and come with one of the loudest-clicking freehub bodies around. Don’t plan on coasting up behind anybody without them noticing, because the rear hub sounds like a pissed off rattlesnake. Aside from the noise, the Fulcrum 5 wheels felt stable and complemented the stiffness of the RS nicely. Durable and smooth, the Fulcrum 5’s make a great training wheelset as most will swap out wheels for race day.

Conclusion.
Overall, the Noah RS is ready to race right out of the box. It’s also ready to climb, descend and tackle cobbles like nobody’s business. It has a price tag literally thousands less than its big brother, so you can still afford to renew your license, pay for your new team kit and take your spouse out to dinner.

Fast, Fast, Fast.
4 5

Noah Review July-2011

First off the staff at Realcyclist are awesome. Some of the best customer support on the web.

Debated for months on whether to purchase the Ridley Noad RS or the Pinarello Quattro, with the advice of the staff I settled on the Ridley.

The bike is beautiful. Frame is definitely stiff, the only con I have with this bike is the Fulcrum 5 wheelset. They are slow to roll but once to speed are fine. SRAMs take some time to get use too; dropped the chain twice on my first climb.

The Force shifters are solid in addition to the brakes. It corners well, and is surprisingly more compliant with road imperfections in comparison to my 2008 Giant TCR.

The jury is still out on the extent of the aero benefits, but it is very noticeable on descents.

I can't say that it's any better than any other bikes but I can say it's an excellent bike for the money.

Ridley RS Breakdown

Posted on

Todd from Ridley giving some info on the 2011 Noah RS.

Noah RS = Aero Bike for the Masses

Noah RS = Aero Bike for the Masses

Posted on

This bike rides great and offers aerodynamic qualities normally reserved to TT bikes. The overall package is really solid for the money. I rode an all-black final prototype around Deer Valley last August and was very impressed.