willin

willin

Wasatch

willin

willinwrote a review of on July 17, 2016

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: Runs large
Height: 6' 0"
Weight: 190 lbs
Size Purchased: medium

This is great for casual riding. I've got many compliments at the style. I would not say its slim fitting. I'm 6' and 190 lbs and the large size was loose. The medium fit well but was not super tight.

The fabric stretches too much to put much of anything in the back jersey pockets. I can get my phone in there, but if its too loaded down (e.g., energy bars, tube, tools, wallet, etc) then the fabric would stretch down to my knees. I once loaded it down with my entire kit and the mass of it just bobbed below my saddle and was comical looking.

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willin

willinwrote a review of on March 25, 2016

Amazing boot, esp. for low-volume feet
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

First: This boot skis great and are nearly as light as rando race boots.

If you have a skinny, low-volume foot and have problems with getting enough pressure over the top of your foot and heel retention problems, then this is the boot for you.

Background I've been skiing the very light Dynafit PDGs for the last 3 seasons for all my skiing. They wore out, and I got bigger skis than they could drive, so I needed a real touring boot.

Weight: When picking up the Spitfire I could hardly detect the weight difference from the PDG.

Fit: My feet are essentially size 11 toes on a size 9 foot, so it balances out to a size 10---27.5 mondo. I have spindly ankles, and I've always had trouble cranking down boot levers tight enough to get good heel retention and keep my foot from sliding around inside. I've resorted to putting an piece of an plastic tongue of an old ski boot inside my boots and wear ultra thick socks in order to fill some of the volume. Not so with the Spitfire! I set them on the intermediate setting with thin ski socks and they feel firm. So, if you have heel retention or volume issues from small ankles, get these boots.

The PDG has extreme ankle mobility limits with no resistance. The Spitfire has the same ankle mobility, which is much more than other boots in its same "light touring" class, but because it has a full tongue, more plastic-on-plastic rubbing, and a slightly thicker liner, it has a bit more resistance than the PDG. But it surely is the best within its class.

Due to the higher ankle mobility, they allow your stride to be more like regular fluid walking, no bobbing of the torso up and down with every step that make bigger boots inefficient---this was the biggest revelation I had when going to PDG-type boots compared to standard three-buckle big touring boots: its not about the weight on your feet as much as how big boots affect your stride.

Ski Performance: I've put about 25k vertical into these boots in the last month in a variety of conditions, from blower powder, frozen mank, mashed potatoes, etc.. I've summited and skied peaks involving some booting, etc. The TLT and PDG cuff is known for being super stiff in terms of forward and backward lean. The Spitfire is a bit softer, more progressive flex in the fore-aft axis relative to the PDG, but is stiffer on every other axis (The PDG/TLT also wears out its cuff rivets quickly because of this). left-right lean allows you my to put much more power into the edges, and the good twisting stiffness enables high ability to get skis pointed where you want, even in really challenging crust/mashed potatoes snow. Relative to some boots, the forward lean is not as aggressive and I ended up adjusting it all the way forward, and I would like to move it more, but its fine where it is. I also ended putting on the power strap (never used one before) and I like how it increases the forward stiffness of the cuff.

Booting/alpinism: The top-of-foot buckle is actually positioned on top of the foot, so it does not become unbuckled when kicking steps and scrambling up cliffy rocks. The cuff is small diameter so I can use light and skinny(er) soft-shell pants made for climbing rather than baggy ski pants.

The fiddle factor: This is not a fast transition boot. It takes some fiddling every time. I have to make sure the metal spine's groove slots into the cuff bar on the back carefully. You can't just throw the lever and presto. You have to set the velcro straps just right every time. I'm getting used to it. Its no big deal.

Durability: I have not used the boots long enough yet, but one thing broke on the first day. There's a little metal clip/spring that keeps the top buckle inside the "teeth" that set the tightness of the cuff. The clip/spring is intended to keep the buckle attached around your ankle even when its loose in tour mode. On the very first time throwing the lever, my glove snagged on it and bent it open. I took it off the boot and there's been no problems.

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willin

willinwrote a review of on July 28, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've gone without them for years and I fair better than my tail-attachment friends. The tail attachment tends to catch on things and get pried off, and if its tight enough to stay on, it tends to pop the skin glue of the ski's camber, causing worse problems. It's better to just let the glue do its job. In the rare event that the glue pops, one can usually get it to re-stick, but if the glue is a season old, I keep a roll of athletic tape in my kit to tape the tails down to get me through the day.

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willin

willinwrote a question about on October 22, 2012

Does anyone have experience with these relative to the TLT 5 performance? They seem like they have similar purposes. The differences appear to be that the spitfire is slightly lighter, without a flex toe, and they seem less cluttered visually. But the TLT has the great reputation of being light AND skis half-decent. Can anyone comment on how the Spitfire skis?

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willin

willinwrote a review of on September 18, 2012

Versatile, functional
4 5

I've used it for a couple of months now and it works great. The design is perfect if you go into the backcountry and need a full fishing rig.

You can set it up as a messenger bag-style as a hip pack that won't cam into your waist like a "fanny" pack style will, or set it up as a chest pack if I am wading deep and need to set it up high.

Its great for backpacking because you can have it on your chest, or with the smart application of a few straps, have it mounted on your big pack nicely.

I'm able to stash all tools, flies, extra reel, camera (for the trophy picture), even food and a small volume of water in it.

The only thing it lacks is the fold-out table for tying on flies that some more expensive packs have. However, I have not found that I really need that kind of thing myself.

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willin

willinwrote a review of on August 23, 2012

5 5

I bike commute to work everyday and this piece is perfect. This piece looks very PRO. The fabric does not look overtly like a soft-shell, but more like a canvas, but it sheds moisture, and has a PRO styling that's very un-conservative and un-frumpy. The lapels are actually functional: you can turn the collar up and button it all down to keep out the elements. I'm 6'0" and 170lbs, and my measurements were all on the upper boundary for a Small on the supplied sizing chart. The small jacket fit sort of, but was too constricting, so I took it back for a Medium and it looks and fits great.

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willin

willinwrote a review of on August 23, 2012

4 5

I believe this shirt is AT's slimfit lineup. I'm 6'0" and 170lbs and the medium fits perfect. The fabric feels nice and its perfect for looking PRO in the office. I'm not sure why the product description mentions it being nice for "a long day on the trail"... this shirt has no outdoor pretenses, save that the fabric *might* be sort-of techy, but really its just a nice shirt.

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willin

willinwrote a review of on February 5, 2012

Love them, true to size
4 5

I wear 32X32 jeans and I find the Mediums fit perfect, like a 33 or 34in waist jean and are cut exactly like a nice pair of jeans. I can fit a baselayer under if cold. They are a thin fabric so cold winter activities I'd wear the base, but for high activity and mild temps (25 F ish) I'd go sans baselayer with these.

They are a slender cut though. I use these for backcountry skiing and they barely stretch over my boots. At first I found this a pain, but now I like it since there are no drafts and they seemed to have stretched a tiny amount and go over more easily. The attached photo shows how they go over boots. And with the thin cut they don't feel too floppy and baggy for going out on nordic gear, so now I use this pant for all types of human-powered skiing where i generate the heat and I need something light but snug.

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