wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer

North Cascades, Wa.

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Robert's Passions

Road Running
Backpacking
Trail Running
Hiking
Mountaineering

Robert's Bio

wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on July 28, 2014

The Best Free Standing UL tent
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have used the Super Mega UL 2 as a solo tent for the last two years mainly for a base shelter for peakbagging. There is room for your sleep system, backpack, boots and room to spare. The tent goes up quick, pitches taunt including no loose mesh on the inside drooping in on you. The elliptical design cuts the wind while the side fly guyouts are connected to the tent body allowing for excellent ventilation. Most of my trips have it pitched at 5-8k' and it's performed awesomely for the weight. Good shoulder season tent.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on July 24, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

Great cushioning, stability, and ankle support and able to take on dayhikes, peakbagging, and backpacking in all terrain with the exception of kicking steps in on hard snow, they do work well with strap on crampons though. These are Ultralight hiking boots so durability can be an issue. I am going to try the Verbera II GTX next.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on August 7, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have used it on three backpacking trips this summer in the North Cascades of Washington State at elevations between 6-8k'. I think for the mountains it should be thought of as part of a sleep layering system, using your other base layers as needed to increase insulation and warmth. It will save weight and space and my 4 season tent maintains a temp 10-15 degrees above the outside temp so it's range can be extended. I have used Western Mountaineering bags over the last 20 years and have come to trust there quality and temp. ratings. I have an old Alpenlite, Kodiak SDL, and a newer Bison and Puma for shoulder seasons.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on June 30, 2012

4 5

I have a pair of the low cut trail runners which are all right, the boots did fit well, they were true to size, but the lack of tread on the bottom along with not being strap on crampon compatible was to much for me. It's all most July out here in the Cascades and we still have feet of snow, and huge drifts in the mountains, so I had to let them go. For general trail use, and light scrambling I would recommend them. All of Salomons boots with the wide heel are crampon incompatible.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on August 5, 2009

5 5

I bought these boots three months ago and have put many backpacking, dayhiking, and peakbagging miles on them in the North Cascades. They are an awesome approach shoe when your backpacking in 10 plus miles, you can feel the energy return from the Abzorb cushioning, and ankle support from the hightop cut. I have scrambled scree, talus, boulders, and class 3-4 rock with these. They don't kick in steps or edge on hard snow, but at the low weight and comfort I can wear these most of the time, carry my Scarpa Charmoz, and save a lot of energy. They are still trekking after getting overnight beatings of 30 miles and 10,500', so I love them.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on April 13, 2009

5 5

I have been looking for a lightweight, compressible vest that blocks wind while breathing, and dries quickly. I do alot of peakbagging, and sweat alot, so I like the vest option as a way of keeping the core warm while allowing the dissipation of heat. I have used it three times so far in Winter - Spring conditions, each time with winds in the 15 - 30 plus MPH range. The vest blocked the wind effectively, breathed well, and dried quickly.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on February 26, 2009

2 5

So I saw some of the reviews, and decided to try a pair mainly for easier trails and approaches, especially those low grade grinds. They felt good, and stable in store. Brought them home , went to try them back on and a webbing eyelet ripped out. This and there brand new, the strongest they will ever be. Makes you wonder how long they would survive the North Cascades abuse that has laid waste to so many mountaineering boots in a matter of months. Hmmm.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on October 17, 2008

2 5

I bought this pack, like many based upon the internet pictures, Arcteryx history of quality, weight, and "hydration compatible. I have to admit I was suprised, it appeared to be cheaply made, and hydration compatible didn't mean hydration sleeve, just a couple holes where a hydration tube can be threaded through. For the price I was very disappointed. There are many packs from Osprey,Deuter, Black Diamond, Golite, and others that offer more features, higher quality craftsmanship, more comfort, comparable or less weight, at a cheaper price. Arcteryx is more overpriced fad than function anymore.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote an answer about on May 22, 2008

Hydration compatible generally means there is a dedicated sleeve that will fit a hydration reservoir / bladder such as the Camelback, Platypus, MSR Hydromedary etc... in place. The tube from the bladder is then fed through an opening in the pack and allows for nonstop easy drinking via a bite valve. Hydration bladder systems allow for more hassle free drinking.

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wa.waunderer

wa.waunderer wrote a review of on February 1, 2008

4 5

The jacket is UL and very compressible, it shed light precip, and was totally windproof during peakbags with winds up to 50 mph. I like the closures at the cuffs, and pull strings at the hem. I still like my Schoeller soft shell for highly aerobic approaches in the cold.

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