veg3486963

veg3486963

veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on December 20, 2014

5 5

These shoes are very light. I think they are about 200g lighter than higher end Shimano shoes at triple the cost. The Mavic's sole is also very stiff without being uncomfortable. The toe box is a bit narrow, and consequently the fit is a bit snug. I like this style of fit though, because the velcro straps does not cover the entire soft velcro area. There's about 1 cm of exposed unconnected velcro "loop." This means that, as the fabric stretches a little over time, the velcro straps-the "hook" side-will eventually cover the entire loop side with a well broken in fit. It may take anywhere from 1-3 years for this to happen depending on how much one rides and in which climate. Therefore, I would not need to replace these shoes so soon. The toe box will appear a little pointy though, and some people may not like that look or slightly tight feel in that area. The ratcheting strap is very secure, which is important if you're a racer.

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on December 18, 2014

Interesting concept, but questionable QC
2 5

I love the idea of a single chainring, but I lost my confidence in SRAM's quality control. As I was installing the chainring, one of the bolts broke off before reaching the torque requirement. The other 4 bolts were fine including the heavier steel bolt that fit under the crank arm. The durability of the bolts is questionable. The photo shows the broken bolts, and also appear to be an abstraction of my facial expression at the moment of the brake. There are two bolts and a washer that join each chainring-hole. I probably just had bad luck and received a defective unit. I hope I will get an exchange, because I like the concept of a single chainring crank for multi-speed drive-train. Please advise; I already tried calling SRAM.

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on October 28, 2014

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: Runs large

The fabric and weaving is top notch, and the replica graphics look almost identical to what the pros actually wear. Unfortunately, the fit runs slightly big in a strange manner for a European company. I usually fit perfectly into a size Small in Santini's, which was the maker for Orica's previous kit, and I was hoping for a similar fit with this Jersey made by Craft, which is Swiss I believe; however, the pro-style neck is too big, the chest and armpits are snug, which is okay, but the stomach and shoulder areas are a bit relaxed. These are strange specs. Was craft expecting consumers to be small chested with big shoulders and a beer belly?!? As a replica Jersey of a pro-team, I was expecting a racing-cut, as in slim, but it turned out to be a strange club-cut.

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on October 28, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

The compression is minimal, which I prefer. The fit is true to size. The chamois padding is almost pro: light, firm, thick and comfortable for long rides. The bib stretches well in the area needed when one needs to go #1.

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on July 27, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

The pros: many pockets, and even one on the forearm; Gore-Tex Pro fabric; light weight; helmet compatible hood; armpit vents; sized with enough room to wear over your layers, but not baggy.

The cons: My main disappointment is that the front zipper is not a two way design. This jacket could make one a bit clumsy if used for a technical climb requiring a harness. The new version from Marmot may now incorporate the two way zipper, but this is the discontinued model lacking that feature. I find this surprising for a product at the MSRP of $549.95, but Marmot has always been a little behind with their technical shells compared to Outdoor Research, Mammut, Mountain Hardwear or any of the other major brands for that matter. Stick to Marmot for their sleeping bags, but they need to catch up on their apparel.

I also find the visual aesthetic of the Cerro Torre Jacket to be outdated compared to the other major brands; however, I didn't take off another star for this, because such a characteristic depends, at least consciously, on each individual.

I initially ordered a different jacket (a cool Outdoor Research model), but somehow it actually did not exist in their inventory after my credit card was charged. To compensate the Backcountry staff and I agreed on the Marmot Cerro Torre Jacket to replace the missing OR item. I needed a shell jacket for a glaciated route up Mt. Shasta, but I still had to cancel due the late delivery; however, I appreciate the professionalism and wonderful gesture of the Backcountry staff.

Special Thanks to you all.
:)

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on April 1, 2013

5 5

I use these as liners for mountaineering, and they are the best so far. They are not the warmest, but they are thin enough to fit inside the inner liner mittens of my OR Alti-Mits. Because the Gore Bike Wear Universal Gloves also have silicone pads on all the fingers, I can grip my water bottles without worries of dropping while pouring in the melted snow when I snow camp. I can't recommend these pair if your hands get cold easily, but they work for me very well. They also dry quickly even in freezing temperatures, so if I get them a little wet from the snow melting process they don't turn into popsicles. I also bought a pair of Giordana's over and under liner gloves to compare, and I will use them for their intended purpose, which is cycling only, because those pair do not have silicone pads on the thumbs.

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veg3486963

veg3486963 wrote a review of on April 1, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I bought them to possibly use for mountaineering as well, but it appears that they're best only as liners for cycling. They do not have silicone pads on the thumbs, which makes them slippery for gripping water bottles during the snow melting process. They are thin enough though to fit inside my Pearl Izumi Cyclone gloves, so I will combine them for really cold days on the bike. For multi-sport liners, such as in mountaineering, the Gore Bike Wear Universal Gloves work great due to the silicone pads on the thumbs as well as the other fingers.

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