Skifreak

Skifreak

Spokane, WA and surrounding areas.

Troy's Passions

Biking
Paddling
Skiing

Troy's Bio

Community Ski Expert on Backcountry.com and I live in Spokane, WA. I'm 43 years old and been skiing since I was 3. I average 35 times a year and always trying to ski my age but day job slows my numbers down. I love to rip everything and anywhere. Groomed runs, bumps, trees, deep stuff, make a fool out of myself in the park with my kids, you name it. I'm addicted to the gear of the sport and l LOVE helping skiers make the difficult decisions of ski buying. I'm married with four kids and outfitting them on a regular basis fuels my gear addiction even more. Snow skiing is my passion followed by water skiing a close second. Excellent mountain biking trails out my backyard and I do enjoy swinging the sticks when I can. We all love anything to do with snow, sun, water, and fun.

Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 23, 2014

I would first have to ask if they are sized appropriately for you and your ability level. Cochise is a big, heavy, powerful ski in my opinion and quick isn't how I would describe it no matter where the binding is mounted.

Every Blizzard ski I own or have tried always feel long in the shovels to me and I mount them on factory recommended line. I've wanted to push the binding forward 1-2cm to experiment with but never have(marker griffons on mine). All their research and development sets factory recommended lines for a reason but I always questioned Blizzards for some reason.

Forward mounting positions make the ski iniate turns quicker and if you are a lighter person on long skis this helps you get more enjoyment out of the ski. Always remember if moving the binding forward on your powder specific skis this could give you an over the tips feeling on deep days. Again I think it's all relevant to your size vs the ski length.

Not a black and white answer for you but trying to help with the limited information provided.

SF










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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 12, 2014

You would be very surprised how a 180cm soul 7 skis so short in comparison to your 177 Wall. With the Wall being a traditional camber ski you almost have full tip to tail contact on the snow, minus the twin tip.Not with the Soul7!

It may take you a little time to adjust to the overall length of the longer Soul but when it's a soft snow powder day you will be stoked. I would also use the length skied of the Gotomas and Rockers as a guide for this decision.

If you truly want a very short, quick turning, easier to spin, easier in moguls and tight trees for your weight the 180 could work. If wanting a more dedicated out west ski for the deeper days, big open bowls, more charging ability(this ski isn't a charger), and a never want a feeling of going over the tips then stay long.

All last year I never ran into anybody that wanted the ski shorter but saw many in the shops on the wall returned for people that bought short and traded for long after skiing them.

Hope that helps and maybe some others will jump on this thread to help too.

SF






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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 11, 2014

Taylor,

I have a few questions for you to answer.
1. What are you currently skiing on and what length?
2. What part of the country do you ski in?
3. Will you be using these as a one ski quiver or a fresh/deep snow ski?

Sizing up on this ski is what I recommend for most people and especially at 21 years of age with your aggressiveness. You do sit in between sizes but I weigh many factors when offering advice so that I can provide a very educated recommendation.

Go ahead and shoot me back some answers to the questions above and I will lock down my recommendation.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 8, 2014

Sean,

I have a Griffon 110mm on my JJ with a waist of 115 and it has about a mm left on each side and it hasn't been tweaked at all. I always tell people to call the shop that will be mounting the binding and get their opinion. Some shops will not bend the binding for liability reasons and will leave that up to you.

You can find Marker 120mm brakes for a price if you can't get the 110 to work but I honestly think you will be fine with a minor tweak.

My advice is to verify with the ski shop that will do the work unless you are mounting them yourself.




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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 7, 2014

I would not even think twice about buying the Soul 7 in the 172cm over the 164cm. At your height and weight going with 180cm would not be that far fetched either depending on your aggressiveness and how much snow you routinely encounter on powder days.

As a reference Im 6'1" 178lbs but 43 years old and wouldn't even consider anything less than the 188cm for this ski.

To elaborate on Soren's comments above about effective edge on the snow. Lay the ski flat on the ground in comparison to your Salomon BBR's or anything else that you have skied on. You will notice how much of the ski in the tip and tail is lifted off the ground. As she said above most of the ski will come into play on deep powder days but on groomed runs there is actually not a lot of ski coming in contact with the snow, this is the effective edge when carving.

Sorry to reply so late but in case you were still wondering about sizes I wanted to give additonal advice.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 7, 2014

Lloyd,

Only a graphic update for this season and that's directly from 4frnt themselves. Assuming you are contemplating cheaper last year gear vs one year newer? Tough choices we skiers have to make.

Good luck and let us know if you have any other questions,

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 7, 2014

I always remember a buddy buying a baron thinking he was going to do AT and never did. He didn't like the added weight and wasting the money on something not being used. If you decide down the road to go AT its only money right, lol.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 6, 2014

EMH,

Griffon has 22mm of lift, Baron 37mm because of the AT ability. Griffon will be lighter by quite a bit plus a substantial cost difference as well.

If you want the AT ability then that pretty much sums it up. But if you don't care about turning the Samba into an AT setup then I think you're crazy, pardon my French, to add the weight, the uneccesary height, additional moving parts, and the added expense of the Baron.

You said any opinions welcome so I hope my opinion helped:)


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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 6, 2014

Matt,

I'm 6'1" 178 lbs and just bought the 185 to replace my four year old 185jj. My wife is 5'6" 138lbs and skis the 175 VJJ. At your weight you definetly need the 185, your height could maybe get by with the 175 but that's not my recommendation for you.

I didn't get a chance to demo the new version last year but from everything I read it should ski a touch longer than the original. But if wanting a designated powder ski the 175JJ will get a little short on the deep days for your weight.

I have always wished they made the regular JJ in a 190cm instead of jumping up to the AKJJ but they don't so I ski the ski a little short for me and you will ski it a little long for you. But oh so much fun!!

Hope that helps and enjoy them.



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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 6, 2014

Christopher,

Skis of this type and size are typically not what I go for but trust me I do enjoy jumping on them for a few runs to see what they can really do. I was able to demo both a 183cm and 190cm Qlab in the spring and was very impressed by both. For as stout as the skis were I was able to maneuver them in fairly substantial bumps which really surprised me. But the fun was high speed arcing and total annihilation of anything in my path. Impressive edge grip and stability out of either length. I was able to vary turn shapes and some fun out of the skis.

I didn't demo the Cochise last year but I've tried it in the past. I know people will completely disagree with me but I was not a Cochise fan, but I needed a shorter length. It was a groomer day so can't comment on fresh snow but I have to say that I would prefer the Qlabs over Cochise for groomer fun. Cochise felt boring too me unless flying, little lethargic at slow speeds. My mountains aren't huge where I live so fun at slower speeds is what I prefer for skis that I purchase.

I've spent a lot of time on Bonafides, Kabookies, Bushwackers, Brahmas, and even the new Latigo. Anything bigger than the Bonafide in the Blizzard lineup isn't for me.

Wish I could help more but tough comparison with the QLab being so new.

SF


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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 5, 2014

I'm 6'1" 178 lbs and wear 32x32 or 33/32 dress pants and my jeans are usually 32x32 or 32x34. I own North face Freedom pants in Medium and they are perfect. I think the Large should be right for you. Even when looking at the size chart under the size selection drop down above indicates Large.

And don't forget Backcountry's easy return/exchange policy if you guess wrong. Hope that helps.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote a review of on October 5, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

One of my favorite skis that I kept coming back for during the spring demo days. I might have to finally put my original Kendo's up for sale and go for a new hard snow ski that is easier to pivot and smear through the bumps.

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0 Comments

Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 4, 2014

Abowen,

Sorry for the late response but the season is early so wanting to offer my two bits in case you were still on the fence.

I bought a Kabookie last year and have only spent limited time on a Cochise. Kabookie will be a lot lighter, quicker, and more energetic by far. Cochise will be smoother, heavier, quite a bit more damp, and feel lethargic in direct comparison to the Kabookie.

BUT if you are looking for a more powder oriented, surfier, smoother and just more of a bulldozer approach to the hill then Cochise will do that.

Demanding isn't how I would describe the Cochise but I feel it will make you more tired during the day because of the added surface area and 2.5 sheets of titanium in it. Kabookie is a pretty light ski that can still kick you in the backseat when loaded. Cochise doesn't have that energy level. Keep thinking smooth, stable, damp, and powerful fun.

Hope that helps a little,
SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 4, 2014

Hey there Peter,

I'm a month late to this thread but wondering if you pulled the trigger on anything? Cochise does not chatter. Think heavy, smooth, damp.

Let me know if I can help in any way,
SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on October 1, 2014

Drew,

At your size the 186cm is the right choice. 176cm with all this continuos rocker will be short on the deeper days. This will hold its own on groomed runs but the long turn radius will not be a short and quick turner by any means.

Pay close attention to forums where people have mounted their bindings on this ski also!!

Good luck,

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on September 29, 2014

179cm is my vote, it might seem a little long at first but being that it's probably more directed at being your powder ski the 172cm will feel short. There is a fair amount of tip rocker in this series with some tail rocker as well.

If you prefer skiing at slower speeds, and always make quick turns in tight spaces, love the moguls, and don't think of yourself as an aggressive charger then 172cm would work well for you.

Comparing to what your other ski sizes are its normal to size up a bit on powder oriented skis with rocker. Age can change my opinion on sizes sometimes too.

Hope that helps.

SF



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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on September 9, 2014

WF,

If you are used to skiing a 186cm Crimson then you will probably have to stick with around a 186 in whatever you buy. It's hard to beat the Sick Day series for a directional fun ski for wide variety of conditions, if you ski switch or spend time in the park other options would be better. Going to throw a few other skis in the mix since you asked.

Rossignol Soul 7 188cm - very light, playful, great float, excellent soft snow ski for many people. I haven't quite figured out the obsession with them yet in my opinion, but that's me.

Line SFB 184cm - not as light as soul 7 or sick day but I honestly love this ski to play around on. BUT it skis very very short in deep snow if you mount on Eric Pollards recommended line and going up to the 192cm takes too much fun out of the ski for everything else.

Salomon Rocker 2 108 or even the new Rocker 2 100 - heavier than all of the skis mentioned above but with that comes stability and power. Excellent float and will perform better in skied out crud than others, although the Sick Day 110 does very good despite its light weight, any directional ski performs better in tracked out crud.

Ponder some of those and let me know but you can't go wrong with sick day if that's your initial gut feeling.

SF

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