Skifreak

Skifreak

Spokane, WA and surrounding areas.

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Troy's Passions

Biking
Paddling
Skiing

Troy's Bio

Community Ski Expert on Backcountry.com. 42 year old male, skiing since I was 3. Average 30+ times a year unless I want to lose my day job. I love to rip everything and anywhere. Slalom, GS, bumps, trees, deep stuff, make a fool out of myself in the park with my kids, you name it. Addicted to the gear of the sport and l LOVE helping skiers make the difficult decisions of ski buying. I'm married with four kids that I keep in the best gear and as you can imagine this just fuels my gear addiction. Snow skiing is my passion followed by water skiing a close second. Excellent mountain biking trails out my backyard and I do enjoy swinging the sticks when I can. We all love anything to do with snow, sun, water, and fun.

Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on September 9, 2014

WF,

If you are used to skiing a 186cm Crimson then you will probably have to stick with around a 186 in whatever you buy. It's hard to beat the Sick Day series for a directional fun ski for wide variety of conditions, if you ski switch or spend time in the park other options would be better. Going to throw a few other skis in the mix since you asked.

Rossignol Soul 7 188cm - very light, playful, great float, excellent soft snow ski for many people. I haven't quite figured out the obsession with them yet in my opinion, but that's me.

Line SFB 184cm - not as light as soul 7 or sick day but I honestly love this ski to play around on. BUT it skis very very short in deep snow if you mount on Eric Pollards recommended line and going up to the 192cm takes too much fun out of the ski for everything else.

Salomon Rocker 2 108 or even the new Rocker 2 100 - heavier than all of the skis mentioned above but with that comes stability and power. Excellent float and will perform better in skied out crud than others, although the Sick Day 110 does very good despite its light weight, any directional ski performs better in tracked out crud.

Ponder some of those and let me know but you can't go wrong with sick day if that's your initial gut feeling.

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on September 4, 2014

I did not feel it skied short on the 177cm. In certain aspects it does feel a touch shorter and more agile than the older version in the same length but I personally would never size up on this version.

If you dig hard into reviews on the new Mantra you will find some have struggled on the 184cm for various reasons and had trouble figuring the ski out. 177cm sweet, 184cm not so much.

I'm 6'1" 178lbs and wouldn't even consider the 184cm, but I prefer staying a little shorter for moguls and just a quicker experience.

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 26, 2014

I think the 184cm will ski shorter than the 182 czar but if you are truly wanting more short radius and tight spot fun then go with the 178cm. I ski a ton of moguls on any ski I'm on and always prefer a little shorter. We always wish for deep powder days but where I live the reality is that they don't come around near enough.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 25, 2014

The SFB will ski quite a bit shorter than the Czar feels but my 17 year old son that is 5'11" 145lbs uses the 184cm. I'm 6'1" 178lbs and use his 184cm all the time and find it a total blast but too short when it's deep. But it is also mounted on Eric pollards recommended line which is too far forward for my liking.

178cm if you want a easier ski in the park, lighter, and quicker.

184cm if you need and want more float and stability. They ski VERY short, especially if you prefer to mount more towards a center position and ride switch.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 23, 2014

I remember my Line Sick days having something odd like that but not quite to that extreme. Make sure you let the place know about it before mounting them at least. Probably be fine but at least it will be noted if it starts to seperate.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 23, 2014

Sorry for not getting back sooner, tough time of year for me. I would mount on Line's factory recommended line, no reason to stray from that on this ski in my opinion.

As far as the other issue I would send a couple pictures to backcountry or wherever you bought them and see what they say. Can't say that I recall seeing what your describing. I know the metal edge didn't go clear to tail but as far as them not being the same that's a mystery to me. LINE should back this up if it's a manufacturing defect.

Good luck

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 22, 2014

Ya, I thought the 183cm for me was plenty and it felt all of that. So even at your size the 192 with that stiff tail is a stout ski for sure.

I find my 180cm Kabookie way more fun than the TST was in almost any condition. TST still a harder charger.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 19, 2014

Joshua,

The newer versions will initiate turns quicker and easier and will try to stay on top of softer snow a little better and that's really about it. It's still a true volkl Kendo just a touch more forgiving.

I'm 6'1" 178lbs and have owned a Volkl Kendo 177cm for years and can only say that a few times I wish it was longer. But that's only for high speed GS turns on groomers. Everything else the 177cm is by far the right choice. At your weight I would think the 184 is about right but also depends on your ability level and aggressiveness .

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 19, 2014

Zach,

Honestly you could go either way but 8mm is reaching the point to where it takes a pretty good tweak or bend to make the brake work and some shops won't take it that far.

To be safe go for the 115, the rocker 2 isn't exactly a big time carver and you won't notice the extra width on powder days. Only time it would come into play is if you are trying to really tip the ski up on firm groomed snow and possibly drag the brake. Only you know how much the ski will be used in this situation.

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 7, 2014

Can I find out some more information from you? Height, weight, age, where you ski, and are you hard charging aggressive or more technical playful finesse type of skier?

179 Norwalk will feel longer than the 185JJ. Remember a Norwalk is a wide version of the TST. Stiff non rockered tail. More high speed charging capabilities than a JJ.

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 7, 2014

Hey Mark,

Are you the same Mark that I was helping decide between the TST and SFB further down on this thread? New Zealand I'm betting yes.

At least I can say my characteristics of the ski was pretty right on how you described it. Hard charging = TST, more playful = SFB. Sorry you haven't enjoyed it but buying skis is tough. I mess up quite often as well, you're not alone. I try to stay open minded and not push my opinion to strongly unless asked directly. Giving ski characteristics is the way to give people advice without alienating manufacturers and becoming biased. TST was a little much for my liking as well, I purchased it at a great price couple years ago and sold it shortly after.

What length did you get the TST in?

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on August 7, 2014

Hey there John,

Sorry for the delay but summertime has me waterskiing and playing outside, not on computer much.

185cm all the way! Skis super short and you will go over the handlebars on the 175cm on deep days. It may feel a little big for about the first run and that's it and maybe in some big moguls for your height. At 180lbs 185 is the right choice.

I will start paying more attention to the questions from now on. Buying guides on the way:)

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 20, 2014

Every Dynastar Cham I have picked up seems on the heavy side to me so haven't pursued them yet, but I will try and demo next season.

I have tried to replace my older non rockered kendo with other skis in its category but I always have a blast when I jump on it. The only ski that I have considered selling it for is next years Blizzard Latigo or a Bushwacker. I would give up hard snow carving and grip for the Buschwackers more free spirited approach to moguls and terrain. It's a specialty ski for me also, we all need those!

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 20, 2014

Hey there,

Thanks for asking for my help, I'm glad to see I have a few fans out there. I try my best to hopefully make skiers decisions easier but sometimes it's not as easy as you think.

Right off the bat I don't have any experience with RAMP or Klint but I have a local shop that sells Liberty and hear good things about their products but have not skied them yet. My original Kendo's are 177cm and I compare them to the 180 Brahma and Bushwacker but I only weigh 176-180lbs.

If you want the ski to be more energetic, slightly lighter with a more balanced feeling, don't mind the stiffer tail, stable as hell, absolute knife on groomers, destroys crud, great in moguls but not very forgiving in the tail, go KENDO it's that much fun!

If you are looking for more of a 50/50 ski that has more all terrain versatility in different depths of snow go Brahma. Brahma is a heavier feeling ski in my opinion, it's the way Blizzard designs them, swing weight is higher than a Kendo or when comparing Bonafide to Mantra. This is a very powerful ski for strong guys that want the added benefit of rocker in tip and tail for that surfy and pivoty feeling when needed. I feel my Kendo is quicker edge to edge in a mogul field and on groomers but lacks the easier to release tail of the Brahma. The Brahma swing weight can bog me down after awhile when hammering a lot of bumps but you can let the ski absorb more of the mogul when tired vs the stiff tail Kendo.

If I lived on east coast and was buying this ski as my primarily hard snow ski and didn't care about soft snow/off piste versatility hands down its Kendo. If you are putting more emphasis on making sure you cover a broader range of conditions and want to go one ski quiver then Its hard to beat the Brahma. Your extra weight won't notice the heavier Blizzards the way I do.

Let me know what you are thinking or if you have other questions, all depends what your target for this ski is.

SF

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 19, 2014

Awesome, hopefully I will here from you next year. There is no way that the 180cm doesn't charge and play harder than our 185JJ's do.

I will be looking forward to a review!

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 18, 2014

Hey Phil,

I honestly don't have a clue what Palmers are but what lengths are they? I'm 42 6'1" 178lbs and own 185 and 195 JJ's. I personally have not skied the Magic J yet but know the ski.

I think it really depends how aggressive you are. Do you charge hard, ski fast, want maximum float and power? Or prefer the ski to remain playful, lighter, easier to swing around and willing to give up a little bit of deep day float and have to stay a little more center balanced to prevent feeling over the tips?

Also depends what part of the country you live in and how big your terrain is. The 190cm is a pretty stout ski from everything I read but at your size it should work very well for you. Only you know how strong you are at 63 plus your ability level. If you said you were 33 years old without a doubt I would say 190cm but I want to make sure you have fun on the ski without it being too much.

Again I'm not familiar with the Palmers so that makes my recommendations more difficult.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 17, 2014

I would base what weight you will be using the ski for the majority of the time. I don't consider pack weight but if that's what you will be using a lot then it is a consideration at your lighter weight.

Please remember that nobody anywhere says the Soul 7 is a charging ski at any length. If you ski a lot of NW heavy crud you will be disappointed in its performance. Playful, light, agile, quick, surfy, and fun are it's characteristics.

Tough recommendations for you, I wish I could be more black and white.

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Skifreak

Skifreak wrote an answer about on June 14, 2014

You didn't sound like a kid but wanted to make sure. I'm not exactly a husky individual myself so no worries. You are in between sizes I'm afraid and the 188 does seem a little much for your weight but not necessarily in this ski. I think if you were looking at other skis in the 188cm length some red flags would pop up. Rossignol still has a perfect fit guarantee I think so whatever you choose you should have the option of trading it if you feel it is wrong, plus Backcountry's policies depending when you purchase it.

I'm never a fan of long skis up in my area, too many tight spots and I really enjoy moguls so I choose lengths wisely with those conditions in mind. I do own both 185JJ and 195AKJJ so I'm aware of how big skis feel and only pull my AKJJ out on very deep days.

If you are really struggling with what size to get you can always look at other things that come in different lengths, just a thought.
If you have always felt you wanted a shorter BD then honestly the 180cm could be the way to go. You will give up some float and charging ability but this ski is not a charger anyways. Its meant to be light, agile, and playful in any length. For myself I wouldn't even consider anything other than the 188cm but I'm 6'1" 178lbs and 42 years old. I tried both the Soul and Super 7 and was amazed at how short they really feel.

Keep me posted and hopefully somebody else will jump on but tough this time of year.

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