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sundaymtn

sundaymtn

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Seth's Passions

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on November 1, 2010

4 5

These were cool enough for my tough to please 8 year old. The material is the kid tough columbia stuff I now specifically seek out, which practically has a texture to it. I don't know what they call it but you can tell just by grabbing the sleeve or pant which one it is.
My daughter said "no bibs" so fit was important. These have the side cinch pull straps on the waist but I'll probably invest in a good nylon belt too just because that'll be more comfortable for her. The other things *I* was looking for were scuff guards at the ankles and a couple good pockets, both check out fine. No snow yet but as far as I'm concerned this is just a different style and the core fabric is what I was looking to find again.

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on October 31, 2008

5 5

reasons you might need this shoe:
-you've come down in a puddle with your left foot and the top of your oncoming right foot gets soaked with the spray (why don't those trails ever dry out)
-you've run in 15 degree temps and the wind seems to blow right through your toes
-you do that quick step/jump/hurdle/tip toe to avoid roadside slush because you still have 4 miles to go and still want reasonably dry feet
-you *almost* roll your ankle(s) repeatedly when forcing your road shoes on the trail
Well, those become non-issues with this shoe, but you'll get these new issues:
-a ride like a suv, forget long distance road running in them
-if its not cold out your feet will get hot (gore tex can only do so much)
-when its pouring (yes, they will get soaked eventually without gaiters) these hold the water in almost as good as they keep it out, a whole new level of *squish* awaits you
-that's a lot of money for sneaks

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote an answer about on October 30, 2008

tough call Terry, I dont consider my feet to have high arches and I notice that these soles are flatter than my Bowerman Nike's.I know flat feet tend to overpronate so I can offer that they are pretty stable even after a year of use. I actually notice my foot being "righted" when landing a little off (which is 90% of the time when trail running) since the shoe wants to land flat.

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on October 17, 2008

5 5

With my pack on I'm probably over the limit on these but since they (the tails) are a little longer than other models the float is still pretty good. I like the rubber and strap binding since it molds to a variety of foot wear (hunting boots, tele boots, sorel's, and hikers). I also like the binding since it packs flat when you squish the shoes together and strap them to your backpack. Crampon is light duty, not in durability just aggressiveness, but had no problems on wind blown snow-crete and ice mix on moderate grades. The description says recreational trail hiking, I'd say if you own crampons already you can push these way beyond recreational and not get into trouble. The deck frays at the edges for a nice broken in look, no compromise in function though.

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

4 5

Low light lenses are great for trail running and PM skiing, I like the wrap-around strap temples for road races. I've found that the lenses scratch easily, but for 30 bucks I can send in scratched lenses and get new ones under the warranty. That's better than a new pair of 30 dollar shades any day! minus the initial investment of course...

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on May 23, 2008

4 5

so I've had about 30 days with these, when putting them on the vertical orientation of the heel loop is easy to catch with your finger tip and pulls at the right angle every time. No velcro involved in the strap system makes for a silent dismount. Definitely a learning curve involved with the spiral nature of the 360 webbing system, but once you get it you'll find it cinches down better than any other system. Sturdy toe bumper hides my gnarled toes, err, provides protection with ventilation. Cleaning the forefoot area of the insole is made difficult because of the bumper and webbing, but I wouldn't give up the bumper and they appear to be dishwasher safe anyway!

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on April 24, 2008

5 5

I bought the Arc'teryx stingray pant and these in the same weekend. I did a short bc tour skinning and skiing about 600 vertical breaking trail both ways. I ended up returning the Arc'teryx pants since their cut was a little funny, they had no thigh vents, weak boot cuffs, and very limited pockets (granted, they're billed as an in area pant). On the other hand the TNF Light Smoke were perfect, I'm sure there's a lot of technology behind the stingray pant material but it felt fragile to me and would probably make that flapping noise in high winds. The light smoke material feels substantial and has good fit and stretch through the inner thigh which was great for skinning and climbing where you don't want resistance getting a leg up. The thigh vents are well placed and gape open when you step so you get good air flow, though the movement and fit changes slightly when they're all the way open. The light smoke is heavier than the stingray pant but I attribute that to stretchier, more durable fabric, a better padded waist yoke, more pockets, and real adjustable powder cuffs at the ankles... all positive trades for me.

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on November 12, 2007

2 5

without the sturdy fabric and stitching usually found shoes in this class these did not stand up. the softshell material started to come unglued from the toe bumper after 4 months and continued to threaten further detatchment so I had to return them under salomons 1 year policy. nice looking shoe, unfortunately what they offer in comfort they lack in long term quality and ruggedness

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on November 12, 2007

5 5

I owned a pair of asolo's while building a house and they stood up to a lot of abuse, but lasted 3 years before they essentially tore from the inside out. I ran across the same model in a popular discount catalog for 40 bucks and bought them again. That shoe is now retired so switching models to the light hiker for this purchase was a gamble, but true to form, the asolo sole materials and their transition to the upper is just as sturdy as the retired hikers. the toe box area is not only supported by the trademark toe grip that seems to adorn all asolo's but there's three layers of material stitched together in the front - you really feel like you're lacing yourself too something when you put these on. Combine that with a firm heel cup and waterproof breathable fabric and here's another pair of shoes I'll have for a long time.
the red/grey combo comes off looking somewhat like a bowling shoe, maybe its the light grey sole - dunno, still like it though.

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sundaymtn

sundaymtn wrote a review of on January 18, 2007

4 5

immediately comfortable, except you have to consider that a softshell without any reinforcement means less stability. I wouldn't want to hike downhill for any length of time since the softshell lets your foot slide forward. In the same sense the forefoot allows for a lot of lateral motion. I bought them for work and leisure and for that they are perfect they go with all my pants, easy on in the morning, easy off for the lunch time run, sheds water like rubber after cleaning the snow off my car, feet never get hot in the softshell.

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