step160023

step160023

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

4 5

I used lightweight silk as a base, then this, because silk has a better feel but transmits moisture well. I also had a smartwool mid base layer as an alternate. Both performed well - wicked the moisture out and comfortable whether as a top layer in mild conditions or under an insulating layer and/or windbreaker. No stink after multi-day use, and washed and dried fine. If used as outer layer, I did notice some pilling around the armpits because of the pack straps (Osprey Aether 85, which has pretty rough material). I'd say this is a good, and cheaper, alternative to wool. The neck was loose, but that was good for me, as it vented heat/moisture.

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

4 5

I wore a synthetic puffy while hiking during the day (moisture was a constant on the AT in February), but immediately switched to this in camp. It is amazingly warm for its weight and bulk - shake it out of the stuff sack and you're good to go. I was initially turned off by the very tight wrist-sleeves, and even put tennis balls in them to try to stretch the elastic, but in the field they weren't uncomfortable, just very snug. A velcro or snap closure would be a good addition, though. Nice roomy hood...I'm 73", 175 lb, and XL fit well.

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

5 5

I used this liner for over a month in below freezing to zero conditions, coupled with a zero degree rated mummy bag. Unless it was on the colder end of the spectrum, I unzipped my bag halfway and still remained comfortable. Its main value was in keeping the down bag clean - my damp socks, gloves and a water bottle slept with me (as well as my sometimes damp baselayer) inside the liner. When it was extremely cold, I kept my down camp booties on as well, and they usually collected some grunge in the evening before I climbed in. Just shook it out in the morning, and stuffed it in the same sack as the bag. The feel of the liner was more pleasant than that of the bag, but the color was a bit odd - seemed more suitable for the playboy mansion than a down bag in the wild...but that's a quibble.

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

5 5

This is one of 3 dry bags I took on the first leg (about 240 mi) of the AT earlier this year. The others were heavier, and were used for my sleeping bag and for my down booties, pants and pullover. This one was used for my food. It did not have a valve like the others, but since food didn't need the air squeezed out and compacted like the down gear, it functioned well without one - I just hugged the bag, then folded the entry several times, then snapped the closure. It comes with a D ring as well, and when hanging the bag from bear cables or stringing it up to a limb, either the ring or the closed clasp worked well. Although extremely lightweight compared to the other bags, it held up fine and did not leak after over a month of use and abuse. Highly recommended if you don't need a bag with an escape valve to reduce the volume of fluffy gear.

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

5 5

I used this extensively on a winter (70 mile) hike thru the GSMNP in February. You barely notice it - very thin, lightweight and comfortable. If warmer, you can fold the earflap part up with the chinstrap on top of your head; if really warm, the strap allows you to hang it off the back of your neck in front of your pack. For single digit temps in windy conditions, I used a buff below, a fleece cap over it and my windbreaker's hood cinched down, and was still toasty at a wind chill way below zero. Packs small as well; I kept it in a small chest pack attached to the main backpack, along with snacks, water and emergency gear.

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step160023

step160023 wrote a review of on March 22, 2013

5 5

These booties were great as winter camp gear in the smokies. My feet were at least damp at the end of each day's hike, and if the temp was below freezing (most days), these went on as soon as I got to a shelter or set up my tent. I wear Keen size 12 hiking boots, and the XL fit fine. The bottoms are fine for walking to the privy or to the water source, unless the ground is muddy or wet snow. Bare ground or powder, no problem. They have two tightening cords, one at the top and one at the ankle hinge - very secure, and easily mated with down pants with no gap.

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