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ste4404647

ste4404647

ste4404647's Passions

Climbing
Snowboarding
Hiking & Camping
Fly Fishing
Biking

ste4404647

ste4404647wrote a review of on July 27, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have been using one of these for several years now, and will continue to do so. The auto block works great as long as you have the right carabiner. I have a Petzl William, which I highly recommend using with this, an HMS is pretty much necessary. It works swimmingly in guide mode too. The great thing about it, is that you get the features of a GriGri and an ATC guide. It's super lightweight, very durable (I've dropped it more times than I can remember with hardly any nicks, and none where the rope runs through) and no moving parts. The rappel mode did take a while to get used to, but now after a few hundred of them, I have it down. I can glide down the rope with absolutely no problems. I even hung my dog from my harness ( he was in a rated harness too) and I was able to get down the rope smoothly. If you're new, I would still suggest starting out with an ATC, so you really get to understand the necessity of keeping your brake hand engaged at all times, you never know when you'll leave the smart behind. After you wear through an ATC, graduate to this.

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ste4404647

ste4404647wrote a review of on July 27, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 11"
Weight: 175 lbs
Size Purchased: 11

I really wanted to love these as I'm a huge fan of Mammut products. The Backcountry gearhead I talked to advised that these would make great approach shoes, which sadly, they do not. For the positive, they are probably the lightest shoes I've ever owned, stylish for out around town, very comfortable, adequately cushioned for light loads and the heel folds down. They are also very durable. I dried them out too close to a fire, and they started melting (it was super hot) but didn't melt through like my socks did. I've also hiked quite a bit in them, and there's hardly any sign of wear and tear.

Now on to why I don't think they are great for the approach. First off, the rubber is not sticky climbing rubber, but more like a regular running shoe's rubber. Torsionally, these are also pretty flimsy, so you will not be able to hold a small edge. You'll either roll off, or get tired trying to hold it with your feet. There aren't any loops on the back to clip them to your harness, which seems absent minded, because these would actually be a great descent shoe because they are feather weight. Lastly, I noticed that the way my foot fits in them, my heel is shifted to the inside of the sole, so that about a quarter of my heel is supported by the side of the shoe. I've never had this happen in any other shoe. I'm confident Mammut could make a great lightweight approach shoe, as every other product of theirs I've ever owned has been top of the line. Unfortunately, this is not it.

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ste4404647

ste4404647wrote a review of on April 29, 2013

3 5

I like these shoes, but man did they open up in volume. I read reviews and got them in street shoe size. Worked awesome for a few weeks but gave up space after about 100 pitches. When wearing barefoot, my feet (of course lubricated with sweat) started slipping and sliding around. Not a very comforting feeling when about 15 feet above the last bolt! I've started wearing socks with them now, something I couldn't have done when I first got them. My last trip I even wore my thick hiking socks and they were, well, comfortable. Not necessarily a good thing in climbing shoes.

Edging, plain sucks. I had to creat an edge with a file in order to get onto any micro footing, and still, it's pretty sketchy. It could just be that my shoes are too big, but still, I just don't trust mini footholds in these.

Over all, I would highly recommend these to a beginner. The price is hard to beat, the rubber rules (5.10 C4) and they are damn comfortable... That is unless you're standing in the Arizona sun, like I frequently do. I would definitely get them a half to full size smaller. By the time you wear through these, you'll understand what kind of climbing you're into and will be able to pick a new shoe accordingly (aggressively down turned, all around, crack). If you do know what you want, read reviews and spend the extra $50 to get a shoe that works on whatever terrain you're looking at.

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