skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on March 23, 2009

5 5

I've got the avalung version of this pack, 32L size. Just enough room for everything you need for day tours. I carry avy gear, a helmet, camera, goggles, spare mittens, water, and a softshell in mine. If it's cold, I'll stick a down vest in there too.

The avalung gives added piece of mind, though I hope to never need it. I like the separate pocket for shovel and probe. Nice to keep that stuff separated from things you get all the time. I carry my helmet with me and don't like it dangling off the back, so having room inside is a plus.

Carries skis well, though you can tell it's a light pack not designed for large loads when they're on there. The rest of the time, fit is comfortable. When I first got it, I wanted more small pockets to keep things organized, but after using it, I haven't missed them.

Overall, great pack. And when you can get it on tramdock, it's that much better.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on March 23, 2009

4 5

Great for climbing and skiing in no-fall terrain or on hard snow above exposure. Im kind of a ninny when it comes to walking on knife-edge ridges and the like, so having a whippet in hand to me is sort of like having the tattered stuffed pink elephant is for my 2 year old. Most of the time the comfort is just knowing its there rather than anything its doing. That said, having something to reach and grab with while climbing steep stuff is nice. One star off for being silly expensive.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on March 23, 2009

5 5

durable and grippy enough not to slide backwards on the skin track, even when you're following the BD crew on dawn patrol and they're going straight up the hill. What more could you want?

I've heard gripes about the tip loop but never had a problem with mine coming off. If you make sure the tip to clip length is adjusted short enough to clip on nice and tight, I don't think you'll have problems. I wrapped a rubberband around my skins right behind the tip loop to keep the folded back portion from coming undone. also found that a utility knife works much better than the included trimming tool, just be careful.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on March 23, 2009

4 5

As a confirmed dirtbag who refuses to spend any more than necessary on gear, I think these are great. They're not the fanciest goggles or even the best optics, but they work, and they won't break the bank. Never had trouble with fogging, and mine with goldlight lenses work in a variety of light conditions, from just barely light enough to ski dawn patrols to full sun bluebird days. I've thought about upgrading a few times, but why?

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote an answer about on January 17, 2009

I don't think you're asking about the anti-piste (as suggested in the previous answer), but rather the fact that the coomba is categorized as both an alpine ski and a touring ski. There is no difference between the two, K2 has just intended for it to be used in both applications. The K2 Anti-piste has the same dimensions as the Coomba, but a slight rocker in the tip and the inserts for mounting a tele binding without drilling.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote an answer about on September 25, 2008

Take a piece of paper and put it flush against a wall. Put your bare foot on the paper, with your heel against the wall. Make a mark on the paper at the end of your longest toe. Measure from edge of paper to the mark in centimeters. This is your size for ski boots. Boot shells come in one cm increments, so a 24 and a 24.5 are going to fit the same once the liners pack out. If your 25.5 boots are too big, then you'll want to go down to a 24 or possibly a 23 shell.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on January 16, 2008

5 5

I bought these skis and mounted them with Fritschi Freerides, intending to use them for backcountry and deep powder days in-bounds. While they remain my only backcountry ski, I find myself using them in-bounds at least 50% of the time as well. Anytime the snow conditions are questionable, this is the ski I grab. There is no such thing as bad snow on these skis. Windpack, crud, slush, mank, you name it, these skis can handle it. They're fairly soft in the tip, so they keep you on top. But being Atomic, they also have amazing lateral stiffness and edge hold, even on ice. Oh, and did I mention that they are light enough to go up as well as down?

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on January 16, 2008

5 5

I agree with the other reviewers that you need to set the DIN higher than you would expect. I was prematurely releasing on hard snow until I cranked mine up. Other than that, my only gripe is that the enclosed user manual contains no information about setting them up, although Lou Dawson provides ample information at wildsnow.com.

As far as on-hill performance, they have been fantastic. Every bit as stiff as I would expect an alpine binding to be at a fraction of the weight. And they climb well to boot.

Not sure I understand the one comment about having to reach down to put them in tour mode. Just use your ski pole to release the heel or set any of the three tour heights.

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skibikejunkie

skibikejunkie wrote a review of on April 2, 2007

3 5

I could see this boot working well for a very high volume foot. I have wide forefoot and high instep but a narrow heel. There was too much room in the heel area for me to properly control my skis, so this boot didn't work for me. If you have thick feet all the way around, this could be a good choice. They tend to run big, so buy 1/2 size smaller than you think you need.

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