roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303

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Lorin's Passions

Snowboarding

Lorin's Bio

roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote a review of on October 2, 2011

5 5

Utah powder is where it's at, so I won't go too far into arguing about the best place to find it in Colorado, but the comments he made about the Fish seem pretty good. However I OWN one, don't just demo it. I ride it everywhere and on all days. Its tight turning radius (smears turns a bit, but carves remarkably for what it is) is amazing in the trees. In fact, I even ride this board on groomer days. It is simply the fastest snowboard I own, and I've ridden my share of Arbor, LibTech, Rossi and Salomon boards.
The board, to me, is a quiver killer. The ONLY thing I don't recommend is switch. As the Coloradoan mentioned, it's best done in a pinch. So for you park rats, not a good choice, but this board has SO much pop it's unreal, and it manuals like you wouldn't believe....flex for days.
I am selling all my other boards because they just aren't fun anymore. The Banana Hammock was my last powder board and it does not come close. It's way too one-sided and honestly it has a good bit of nosedive in the steeps. The fish never seems to sink.
I ride a 158, 6.1' and 185 lbs. Take one of these bastards on a mogul run and turn some heads :)

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roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote a question about on September 12, 2011

How is this for a tele setup? I've never seen any Pontoons on tele mountings. I'm mostly a resort skier but do some backcountry as well. Are there skins to fit this or should I stick to my HIppie Stinx?

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roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote an answer about on August 15, 2011

I read the review of the skis because I want them but felt inclined to respond, because age has no bearing on tele at all. I'm 32 and have horrible knees, hence why I was afraid to tele for a long, long time. The truth is that if you don't do HUGE (overblown) knee bends (that really aren't needed), Tele'ing makes your legs feel amazing because it works your quads and hamstrings. I ski morning-noon, then snowboard after and have never felt better because of telemark. If you have the bones, go tele and never look back. Meantime I'll be ogling these skis.

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roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote an answer about on January 26, 2011

I am buying these as a gift for my father, an occasional hiker, but can speak from experience about BD poles in general (mine are the step up, with 3 sections, which MIGHT make them slightly less strong): they will (even with 2 sections) collapse without a problem to fit on a backpack. They are very light, extremely well-built, and the flick-lock system? Absolutely amazing. NEVER an issue. And if there is? A simple twist with a phillips-head driver and you're set. The old twist-and-lock system on (every other pole on the planet) is awful by comparison (they ice up and they break). Buy them, You'll be happy.

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roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote a review of on June 23, 2010

4 5

I'd give 'em 5 stars, but dammit, I hate ugly steez, and these are steez-alicious. If you like Grenade gear and the look of most Burton stuff because the concept of a color aneurysm is cool to you, then you should buy these gloves for looks.
I happened to buy them for spring riding/skiing. They breathe pretty well, are comfortable in the snow or in 40 degree weather, they're tough, and most certainly (and best of all) really, really flippin' waterproof. I have large hands and they fit remarkably well: probably the most comfortable glove I've worn, and I'm a pretty dedicated Hestra wearer. Buy a pair and hate the color scheme, but enjoy the gloves.

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roninbambi1102303

roninbambi1102303 wrote a review of on December 29, 2008

4 5

I'm a dedicated Arbor rider (the bigger and stiffer, the better), and I was looking for a powder board. I wanted the Rossi Big Gun swallowtail, but nobody has 'em, so I got a new Hammock.
I read a few (scant) reviews about how the board is "scary" on hardpack, and was a little worried, but so, I've heard, are swallowtails. It's a powder board, and a "jib" powder board, supposedly.
First off, the board feels small at only 160 cm. It is very wide. I wear a 12.5-13 boot and weigh about 170 lbs at 6.1'. This is the only board i've ever ridden that I can put my boots perpendicular to the board and not have ANY overhang on heel or toe. This meant i would have to lean a lot to get on an edge, and it's true.
I got to ride in a hardpack/windblown snow and about 2-3 feet of (heavyish) Utah powder on it last weekend.
This board will sink the nose, NO PROBLEM and send you straight on your face in the flat sections if you are not way in the backseat (i've since moved bindings back) since the nose is narrower than the midsection (as is the tail). If you are traversing on hardpack, take up a religion soon.
However, if you're lucky enough to find a nice, steep to semi-steep hill with powder, this board is ridiculous: best powder ride of my life and I cannot wait to get it out on some ridiculously steep stuff. It's stable, turns like a charm and is more buttery than a homemade biscuit. It's a powder board, only, and one, really, i think for people who are aware that it will take a LOT to keep it from catching an edge on any hardpack/traverse up to the powder, but if you get it in, let 'er rip (no nose diving on steeps, I could lean way forward on it and had no problems).
It's truly a one-sided board and not a quiver killer by any means, but a definite blast in powder. my 167 won't come out on powder days anymore.


***Update: buy a FIsh, forget the Hammock ENTIRELY, it's a waste of time. I never bring the Hammock out anymore, as the Fish is my powder/ice/groomer go-to board and quiver killer

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