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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344

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riverridge2198344's Passions

Trad Climbing
Camping
Paddling
Mountaineering

riverridge2198344's Bio

I like to be outside----mountains, deserts, rivers.

Trying to enjoy the Rockies and get in some exotic mountains every now and then.

So far: two long trips to Nepal, one to Peru, and one to Argentina since 2005.

riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote a review of on February 16, 2013

The best 4-Season canister stove!
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

We have been doing some winter testing of the Vega. Below 30 degrees F, you need to invert the gas canister for great performance (4-season-mode). At 4 degrees F. it boiled a pint of water in 2 minutes 30 seconds.

At 17 degrees F. with no wind, I tested the Vega in 4-season mode with a nearly empty 4 oz. Optimus fuel canister.
Boil time of 1 pint of water was 2 minute 42 seconds.

I then used the same canister on a conventional up-right canister stove (Optimus Crux). The flame barely burned and when it went out 5 minutes later, the water was only 100 degrees F..

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on January 27, 2013

I work for Katadyn and have used first the...

I work for Katadyn and have used first the Hiker & then the Hiker Pro since 1995 in all sorts of very dirty water. I've never had a trace of color come through, in even Colorado & San Juan River water.

Possibly an iron stained water might make it through, but otherwise, if it is less than a year old, return it for a warranty test, if more than a year old, replace the filter cartridge with a new one.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on April 29, 2010

Andrea: Timothy answered your question correctly, but let me add some points on activated charcoal inside Katadyn filters.

Activated charcoal improves water taste, removes organic chemicals (which can be downstream from agriculture or industry), and will remove chlorine as well.

However, once you start using a filter with activated charcoal: the charcoal is only active for about 6 months. No problem with it being unsafe when it used up-----it just is not improving taste and removing organic chemicals.

All the small Katadyn filters, except the Mini & Pocket have activated charcoal inside them. The MSR Mini-works also has activated charcoal.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on January 27, 2010

Jeff (as always) is correct, but let me add more. Inside the filter is activated charcoal. It is very stable until you first run water through it. It is then "used up" in about 6 months.

No problem when the charcoal is "used up", except the charcoal improves the taste of water and removes organic chemicals. If you are filtering downstream from agriculture or industry: the charcoal removes herbicides, pesticides, and other stuff that is not good for you in the long run.

So----if you are worried about taste or chemicals, buy a new filter. Otherwise, be like my fishing buddy: who has used the same filter-cartridge for the last 12 years.

One note: remove the clip that holds the pump in and lube the black O-ring on the pump every year or so with the supplied silicon lube. A dry O-ring can make you think the filter is clogged.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on January 27, 2010

Jeff is mostly right about the sponge. If you clog the outer fabric piece (Filter Protector) that covers the inner pleated glass-fiber filter: the sponge is for cleaning it.

Remove the lattice plastic piece by sliding it off, then unwrap the filter protector and clean it both inside and outside with the sponge. Rinse it off (clean or dirty water) and reassemble.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on October 3, 2009

Vince: China origin is an error on Backcountry.com's web site. if you open the outer package, the foil that covers that tablets is marked "made in USA."
That is not on the outer package though. Only the Sodium Chlorite in the tablets-6.4% ------is from outside USA-----it is from Spain.

Also shelf life is 5 years and expiration date is on bottom of package.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on June 24, 2009

1. Is the 4' hose fully extended and the Base Camp bag raised well (best is 4') above the recepticle container?

2. There is a plastic clamp on the hose. Make sure this is in the relaxed position.

3. Just finished dinner and wine and I'm out of ideas. I have never heard of one of these that did not work----but "excrement occurs!"

4. Contact Backcountry.com

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on June 24, 2009

I may be a little late on this answer---but: Micropur tablets used as recommended: produce Chlorine Dioxide at a concentration of 4 PPM (parts per million). The Environmental Protective Agency currently recommends Chlorine Dioxide as part of the water treatment process for U.S. cities, with allowance of a higher concentration than Micropur gives.

However, the other part of the city treatment process is microfiltration to remove organic matter from water.

If your water is not clean to start with, you can get a by-product,chlorite, which is not good for small children ----or you, with long-term consumption.

Bottom Line: Use Micropur where the water is pretty clean, if you are going to be drinking a lot of it.

Other Chemicals: Main drawback for iodine is that it does not kill Cryptosporidium protozoa. Main drawback for chlorine liquid is: when you use it in water that contains organic material, you get carcinogenic by products.

For a long solo trip in Nevada: I recommend the Katadyn Hiker Pro microfilter. I use Micropur tablets as a backup, or in Asia and South America with microfilters to kill viruses that filters don't remove.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on June 24, 2009

Just one replacement filter-The Hiker Pro replacement cartridge. It will handle dirty water, but the removable filter protector needs to be cleaned with the provided sponge when it gets hard to pump.

The Hiker Pro is an all-conditions filter----it will handle dirty water, as well as clean water.

With any filter system, it is always best to filter the cleanest available water: thus helping filter longevity, and cuting down on cleaning.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on May 19, 2009

No Katadyn microfilter will remove all viruses. There are no vaccines for Hepatitis E, Rotavirus, or Norovirus(Norwalk virus: which can occur in S. America, Africa, & Asia. Waterborne transmission can occur below fecal contamination from infected humans.
My recommend for travel where viruses might be in the water is to first microfilter, then add chemicals to the water. Microfiltering removes protozoan cysts, which the best chemicals (Katadyn Micropur) can still take up to four hours to kill. Microfiltering also removes bacteria, along with turbidity, and organic materials: which can interfere with chemical processes.
Per University of Arizona Dept of Microbiology testing Micropur will kill all viruses, even in dirty 38 degree F. water, within 15 minutes. Although you might notice a faint chlorine odor, there is no chlorine taste with Micropur tablet. Although Chlorine bleach or Iodine tablets will also kill viruses, there is both unpleasant taste and odor

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on May 18, 2009

Hiker Pro information in Jeff's answer is all correct-----except Katadyn Hiker Pro is still in their lineup.
The Hiker Pro sells to the more techy user and the Hiker to those that like the simplest, most idiot-proof: fast, lightweight, durable filter.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on May 18, 2009

BainUT did very well in his answer ------until he said that activated charcoal does not remove trihalomethanes. A very simple Goggle search shows all sorts of articles that assert that activated charcoal does remove most organic chemicals uncluding trihalomethanes, and also chlorine.

The key here is to replace the activated charcoal when it is used up. With chlorinated water: that means when you taste chlorine. With the Vario, you can remove the red cap on the filter and replace the charcoal with Katadyn's Vario carbon replacement 2-pack. With other filters, you might have to replace the whole filter after about 6 months of use.

Please note that not all microfilters have Activated charcoal.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on February 14, 2009

No. Getting the salt out of water is a much more complicated process, to the point that I don't believe you can get a handheld filter that'll do it. There are reasonably small stills available, but this won't do it. You'll end up with very clean salt water.Yeah, to filter out salt you have to boil the water and collect the steam, and let the condensation drip down to a container. Which is a lot of words to say, "you have to distill it".from riverridgeray: Katadyn does make hand-held desalinators. The U.S. Navy has one in every lifeboat. However, they are very expensive, heavy, require clean offshore salt water, and are really intended for emergency survival rather than regular use. They do make bigger (and still more expensive) battery-powered ones for regular use.

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riverridge2198344

riverridge2198344 wrote an answer about on February 14, 2009

I'm not sure if any pump will be right for you, with that much water everyday. Will the water be cloudy, silty, stagnate, or have a lot of algea? This will force you to operate on regular flow, vs. high flow. Your core will eventually clog up so you would have to bring some replacements. I would recommend using a UV sterilizer for water that doesn't need to be filtered from dirt, etc. Along with their micropure tablets. If you bring a filter, I would only use it on the water that you don't have the "stomach" to drink. If you want a great reference with detailed info, check out the Backpackers field guide by Rick Curtis.From riverridgeray. I have a Vario that in "Faster Flow" mode will filter 5 gallons of water in about 7 minutes. However---if you are going to be doing that every day, the water had best be clear or you will eventually clog filters. After 50 gallons or so, you will need to lube o-rings on the valves. Plan on some regular maintenance along the way. If you are not in a hurry, and your water is clear, I would tend to recommend one of the Katadyn drip filters. I trekked in Nepal for 16 days last fall with a small trekking company and 12 friends. We got all our water through 2 Katadyn Base Camp drip filters. The Katadyn ceramic drip filters are slower, heavier, more expensive and tend to last much longer--none are really designed to work with dirty water.Final thought! In Central America, if your water is possibly contaminated by human feces: you are at risk of various viruses, including hepititis A & E. Microfilters do not remove all virus. In Nepal, we microfiltered to remove the more common protozoa and bacteria, then added Micropur Chlorine Dioxide tablets for virus. The combination of microfiltration and chemicals gave us clean, safe water (with no chemical taster) in 15 minutes.Since the UV systems sold here are designed to do 1 liter or less per treatment: multiplying their treatment process to reach 5 gallons per day seems like a stretch of their capacities.

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