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Rudy B.

Rudy B.

Rudy B.'s Passions

Climbing

Rudy B.

Rudy B.wrote a review of on November 23, 2015

4 5

I grew up using these pots. My set must be over 20 years old at this point. These days, there are lighter-weight options, but none more durable. These are still the pots I grab when kayaking or canoeing, when weight is not as much of an issue. I particularly appreciate that the lid can be used as a frying pan. I suspect these pots will always have a place in my gear box.

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Rudy B.

Rudy B.wrote a review of on November 23, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The thing I like about this pot is that it pairs exceptionally well with the MSR WhisperLite International. The flex rings fit perfectly around that stove's base and grip on, making a solid cooking platform that won't slide or blow off.

The thing I dislike about this pot is the lid. It is a struggle to latch it on, and the plastic melts onto the pot if you cover it while using it as a frying pan. The Neoprene sleeve also melts onto the pot if you do this. In other words, you can't fry anything in this pot unless you take off the neoprene and don't use use the plastic cover.

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Rudy B.

Rudy B.wrote a review of on May 31, 2012

5 5

Some know-it-all climber offering me unsolicited beta about the route I was racking up for last weekend told me leave these at the bottom (his condescending words: "you probably don't know how to use those any more than I do.") He had two sets of cams swinging from his gear sling--I own one set. I chose to to ignore his beta and head up cowbells ringing, and I was instantly glad I did! I ended up using four of them, including a ridiculously bomber placement in which I fed the big blue into the rock with the sling coming up and around a small lip; a location no cam would have fit, and a perfect example of the kind of placement you can make with slung hexes that you can't make with wired ones.

I can think of no situations in which I've wished I had wired hexes, and plenty of ones in which I've been glad my hexes were slung. The slug hexes are easier to cam and more versatile in their placement possibilities. If I'm reaching up to a crack that might fit a wired hex, I'm usually doing so with a cam. The times when I'm using my hexes are generally ones when I've already got my hand in the feature I'm trying to place my hex in, and thus don't need the wire to reach for anything. Though there are plenty of places where hexes work and nothing else will, I mostly use my hexes to save cams; I'm not adverse to punching in a cam when pumped, relaxing once I'm clipped in, placing a hex, and removing the cam to save it for later. Buy these--all true trad spirits rock the cowbells!

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Rudy B.

Rudy B.wrote a review of on May 31, 2012

5 5

I bought fifteen of these last season for creating extendable draws. I pared them with BD's FreeWire quickdraws. I removed the dogbones between the draws and combined each pair of biners with a sling (to create an extendable draw, clip a carabiner to each end of the sling, then pass one of the carabiners through the other and clip any two strands. To extend the draw, unclip any two strands from either carabiner, and voila! Reduced rope drag.) I have all of the dogbones saved in a bag, and when I go sport climbing, I take apart all of my extendable draws and put the carabiners back onto the dogbones. It's a time consuming process, but it's a heck of a lot cheaper than owning both a set of extendable draws for trad climbing and a set of sport draws for sport climbing. Extendable draws are a far superior option to quickdraws for trad climbing in my opinion, especially since they can be taken apart and used to equalize trad anchors or slung directly around natural features in the rock.

I have had no problems with the quality of the nylon runners. After a season of use, they are all still in excellent shape; enough for me to trust my life to any one of them, which I do regularly. Dyneema would obviously be lighter and smoother, but it's also more expensive, and I've found these to be the softest and most supple nylon slings I've used, which is good in an extendable draw. I have the full assortment of colors, though I don't use them to color coordinate with my cams or anything fancy like that, as I've known some people to. They just look pretty hanging from my harness. I recommend these durable and affordable slings.

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