peterslug

peterslug

USA

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  • #1936of 19969

Peter's Passions

Trad Climbing
Camping
Sport Climbing
Bouldering

Peter's Bio

Designer by day and night but on the occasional weekend or break partaking in strenuous high adventure sports helps to relieve stress.

peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on May 25, 2014

Versatile Pieces
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have used the Nylon tri-cam set (.5 - 3) for two years and have found numerous placements from passive nut style to the active camming position. I switch up my rack depending on the route(s) but almost always keep a few on. The last route I led, I placed 3 of the 5. I've used them in anchors and plan to pick up additional larger sizes (5-7) for the prevalent large horizontals at the top of routes.
These are great.
The new Evo generation offers a third placement option, making them that much more versatile.

The pictures shows the nylon on the rock side, flip them for less nylon to rock contact.

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0 Comments

peterslug

peterslug wrote an answer about on April 29, 2013

Climbing ropes are rated in Kn. The horse's force (1500 lb) would be 6.67kn if it just was hanging off the end of the rope in mid air. since the horse is not typically in mid air, any resistance the horse applies would be in addition to its bulk weight. Dynamic ropes provide the stretch to reduce the force applied to a climber in a fall, and while 'easing' the rope into the pull, repeated falls still require the replacement of a rope. Studies by climbing rope manufactures show with each successive fall the rope's strength is reduced. Look up 'fall factor' if you want more specific information.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote an answer about on November 19, 2012

It is stiff. I have managed to tighten clove hitches just fine. Comparatively, dressing the knots can be a little bit more time. Excess portions of the cord tend to remain straight, so in the case of the equal-ette setup, the slack portion makes a stiff loop - giving the anchor a 'not as nice clean' look, though utility is not diminished. I rack it untied, butterflied, and clipped to a biner. Its compact and easy to tie a masterpoint.

(1)

 

0 Comments

peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on November 23, 2011

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

These are one step up from the non-convertible pair I already own. They have plenty of mobility and are my go to climbing and travel pants. The non abrading material and general ability to stay clean continues to impress. To top it off, the zip off legs don't leave you baring some awkward upper thigh...nice.
One of the non-essential thread lines along the crotch is getting loose. This generation's construction seems a little less exact then the previous.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on November 16, 2009

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This pants have a little bit of stretch and are comfortable while doing flexible moves. They breath well. (The crotch is vented with six 1/8 in o.d. holes in it, 3 on each side.)
The pant belt is non-elastic and odd at best to tighten. Once adjusted the belt is not an issue, except the 5 inch end that kinda just hangs there. To 'remedy' this I managed to tuck the end into the part of the pants where it comes out.
Super durable and no snags despite often approaching through thorns and cacti then knee barring on a climb. The slate grey shows little to no dirt, or chalk residue after a few days of use.

When compared to my REI minstrel pants, these have a more durable exterior when it comes to friction and snags.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

4 5

The Tikka Plus excels in battery longevity and when used on its multiple settings. If packed snuggly the light can be turned on. Despite it being on for hours in my pack and daily use, I have only needed to change batteries once.

It fits well both on and off my Petzel helmet.
The light's pitch shifts easily, so after packing it typically needs readjusted.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The 1L Laken has a great widemouth for ice cubes and easily cleaning, but the bottle dents easily (especially when full) reducing the capacity. I have no complaints about the paint job, I care about the amount of and quality of water I carry. The food grade interior coating does not change the taste of water and there is no concern with drinking too much from aluminum.
The screw top remains snug after a lot of jostling too, though its just as hard to clean as a Nalgene top. A carabiner will not fit easily on the top of the cap, making it hard to just clip to a pack.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have worn the older style Petzel as well as the Back Diamond Half dome, and I like the ventilation and headlamp clipping the best. The helmet is low profile and light as described so it doesn't get in the way in a climb. The chin straps are easy to buckle, unbuckle, and adjust whether or not in motion. Like any helmet I keep it out of the sun and away from fumes which will retain its functionality for its life. I also avoid the unnecessary clunking about so no news on an impact.

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peterslug

peterslug wrote a review of on June 16, 2008

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

These quickdraws are a great beginner standby. Their solid on bolts and not too heavy for your standard sport route. The gate pull is about average so clipping is not too hard. I've taken a few lead falls on mine and there has been no deformation, just some finish wear. To climb harder sport, multi-pitch, or big walls I'd want a lighter set of keynose or wiregate carabiners.

(0)

 

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