Nawrocki

Nawrocki

Utah

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Joseph's Passions

Telemark Skiing
Backpacking
Hiking
Mountain Biking
Snowshoeing
Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on January 1, 2014

I migrated from the Targa, over the years, to the Karhu, HH and Axl and then the Freeride and now the Freedom. The Freedom is plenty active for me, here in Utah. I don't think there's much point in getting the Freeride over the Freedom unless you ski back east resort only. The Freedom may even be a bit easier to get used to than the Freeride, if you've never been on NTNs. The NTN is active immediately in its range of motion, so you have to "drive the cuff" of the rear boot more. Once you're used to it, they ski very well.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote a review of on September 21, 2013

Binding pictured is Freeride.
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The binding pictured is the Freeride, not the Freedom. Here's a picture of the Freedom...At the front of the binding, at the pivot point, you can see there's a "Torx" style screw (on each side). I've found that this screw tends to back out. Once I applied some locktite to it, the screw stayed in place very nicely. It has a greater range of motion than the Freeride, both in the tour mode and in the ski mode, so it feels a little more like a classic telemark binding. I love the way it skis, the convenience of step in, and the ability to release - an ability I've used! The way in which it attaches enhances edge control. I have 80 days on 2 pair with no issues. In one season, I broke 2 toe pieces on the Freeride, however, which has a more active feel earlier in its initiation (it takes a bit more forward pressure to "break the bellows", on the Freeride) which takes a while to get used to. There was no "getting used to" the Freedom...it was easy to ski on the first run. If you are inclined to parallel turn, or turn flat footed, like on a run out if you're just too lazy to make every turn a tele turn, for instance, the Freedom has a slight "pitch up" on the toe piece that makes skiing flat footed a bit easier, as well. I have them on a pair of Armada JJs and a pair of Rossi S3s. Also, the ski brake on the Freedom seems easier to bend to fit the width of your wide skis than the Freeride's brakes, which means you may be able to make the brakes work on a wider range of widths.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote a review of on August 26, 2013

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The design is good. You put the neoprene knee pads on and the knee/shin guards are held in place. The guards are good. The underlying knee pads wont last two rides as the stitching will fail almost immediately. I like them enough that I'm not returning the second pair, just sewing them up myself, but this is pretty bad manufacturing quality.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on February 4, 2013

I'm thinking 178, and if you mount them +2, that should put the ball of your foot right over the mid point of the ski (overall, and running surface too, as the rocker is pretty symmetrical).

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on January 28, 2013

They are a tad short for you, IMO, but if they work and you love them, why bother? Of course, he who dies with the most JJ's wins, so it's a tough call!

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on January 7, 2013

If you weigh more than about 150 pounds, I'd think the 185 would be a good choice. Especially with Alpine gear. But it's not just a powder ski. It's a great all mountain ski. You'll probably retire your S86's for anything but skiing the bumps.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 29, 2012

The Freeride is a more active binding than the Freedom. The Freedom is more like a Hammerhead on 3, maybe a bit more, whereas the Freeride is more like 4. This doesn't completely capture the difference, though, IMO. I found it harder to get used to the Freeride, as it took more pressure to "break the bellows" so to speak than on the Freedom. The Freedom skis more like a conventional telemark binding. The tour function has considerably more range of motion with less resistance. If you want the conventional feel and may do some backcountry, I think the Freedom is a better choice. If you don't mind more weight and you want a bit more edge control in bounds, the Freeride may be a better choice.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 26, 2012

As Ian said, the 185 or the AK. I'm 5'9" and 165, my son is 6'1" and also 165. We're both skiing this ski in a 185 on telemark gear and they are awesome skis. Because of that, neither of us would use the AK, but on Alpine gear you could. It's just so much fun in a 185, that that's what I'd use. Everyone west of Kansas should dump whatever ski they're on and get JJ's! They get 6 stars.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 26, 2012

Note my answer above, skied on NTN Freedoms and Scarpa Terminator X three buckle boots (they were plenty capable of pushing the ski around in a 188).

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 26, 2012

Funny you should ask. I have a pair of 185 JJ's mounted boot center over the recommended mounting line with the NTN Freedom binding (telemark) and the Scarpa Terminator X three buckle boot. I've been on these for 3 years now and can't say enough good about them. Two days ago I was skiing with a buddy on 188 S7's also mounted with the Freedom binding. His boot is a bit bigger, mounted boot center over the recommended mounting line. Because of this, skiing it in my boot puts me about .5 to 1 CM forward, at most (not enough to be a big issue IMO). The S7 felt a bit lethargic compared to my JJ's - the tails didn't seem to come around as easily. The conditions were about a foot of new snow, slightly cut up at The Canyons Resort, on Dreamcatcher, if that info helps. If you like the rocker design and want something lighter than both, for backcountry, you might consider the S3. I found them to be a hoot and very easy to drive. I also found the S3 fine for groomers in Utah (back east, I'd go for something more along the lines of the E98). If you are willing to use the S7 in the BC and you don't own the JJ, you need to try them!

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 8, 2012

Okay, FH, skied them today. I'm 5'9", 160 lbs and 60 years old. They are 168 Cm, mounted boot center +1 CM, Scarpa Tx on Freedoms. This puts the ball of foot just about center. I bought them as a bump/park ski. They have the same running length as the 185 CM JJ, about 44". The first run they were a bit over reactive to input (squirrelly, but only because they were very responsive). They would be too short as a one ski for everything, for me, but I think they will work well for my application. They ski switch effortlessly and are quick edge to edge. Mounted Telly, I'd go 0 or +1, alpine you could go -2, but the sweet spot is huge, so it probably doesn't matter. Unlike the JJ, as you put them over on edge, a longer segment of the edge engages (the widest part is forward and aft of the rocker) and this is slightly noticeable in carved turns (may have contributed to the squirrelly feel the first 2 runs or so), but not necessarily in a bad way, it just continues to increase in engagement. FH, you should go for the 178, IMO, as an all mountain ski. Given the rocker design, 178, even mounted forward, tip dive will NOT be a problem!

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on December 4, 2012

Rossignol has recommended lengths on their site. BTW, Looking at the 168 Cm S3, it has the same length on the snow as a 185 Armada JJ (about 44"). I only know this as both are in my basement! I picked up the 168 S3 as a dedicated bump/park ski with NTNs and the Scarpa Tx (mounting +1 cm to put the ball of foot about centered on the running surface), and I'm 160 pounds, so we'll see how that works out, but 178, I think, is what the Rossi site would recommend for you.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on November 5, 2012

They come standard with 110, I doubt they'd switch it out, but the Freedom's ski brakes, this year were flexible enough that I was able to bend them out enough to work with a 115 mm under foot ski, easily. You may want to try out the 110 before you drop $40 on the 125. It's only 1/3 of an inch on each side.

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Nawrocki

Nawrocki wrote an answer about on September 1, 2012

Just got back from BC with my last year's skis to compare. Kirk has it right. The new Freeride and Freedom both have wider hole patterns than last years (and years before) Freeride. The current year Freedom and Freeride have the same hole patterns, as Alex mentioned. BTW, the ski brakes they come with are not quite wide enough, out of the box, for my Armada JJs. However, with some minor bending, they seem to fit.

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