Risk-Free Shopping—Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50* Risk-Free Shopping—Free Returns on Orders Over $50* Risk-Free Shopping—Price Match Guarantee
mnichols

mnichols

mnichols's Passions

Climbing

mnichols

mnicholswrote a review of on May 16, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size
Height: 6' 2"
Weight: 175 lbs
Size Purchased: EU 45 / US 11.5

I've always maxed (or come close) the laces/velcro straps on my shoes. Eyelets/buckles are generally touching, which is rough if you need to edge and there's torsional movement from an overly-wide shoe. This last month, I went in search of a shoe with a good lateral fit.

I wouldn't say my feet are extraordinarily narrow either--for me, the standard 'D' width is satisfactory with most running shoes, I've never tried the 'C' width because it seemed unnecessary. Obviously, there's no such width component for climbing shoes, and I've tried on so many shoes that I never thought I'd find an acceptable size. Depending on fit, I run between euro sizes at 45-46 (US 11.5-12), already a disadvantage because I'm toward the high end of the manufacturing bell curve, where there's not as much availability or special attention given. The climbing shoe manufacturers often assume that all proportions scale equally as foot length increases, but I'd wager they are actually alienating a considerable proportion of tall climbers.

I wanted to stay with a velcro shoe (previously used a Red Chili Spirit that was completely maxed but was synthetic and didn't stretch), but they all tended to lack the adjustable range of laced shoes. I tried about twenty shoes. The 5.10 Anasazis and the Scarpa Miuras came "closest" but were still unwearable. With the Anasazis, the slingshot heel dug into my Achilles and the forward-most Velcro strap cinched so far down that the toe-box bulged and creased into the base of my toes. Two of the three Velcro straps were maxed. The Scarpa Miura was a beautiful shoe but the eyelets were close to touching and there's enough leather to expect some stretching. Some pressure on the Achilles but not quite as bad. Sadly, the Miura was perfection along the foot... if they made a narrower upper, I would have accepted the Achilles pressure.

Enter Stratos. My fit is very good. The eyelets are gapped between 1/2" near the toe to 1"+ at the knot. No digging in the back of the heel, some space up front to curl my toes, toe-box width is close to ideal. It has great grip and dust wipes easily. Not much of a downturn but the sole's got strength and helps reinforce a toe stance. Thanks Red Chili! The site mentioned it fits narrow feet best and they weren't BS-ing.

Thanks for bearing with me, the post ran long but hopefully it's a help to others with narrow feet.

(0)

 

0 Comments

mnichols

mnicholswrote a review of on February 4, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Great bag, straps work well, love the overall construction. I haven't tried to fit my tent or anything inside this bag, but it's great for my assorted ski gear. It's my go-to bag that I grab when I want to head to the mountains after work on a Friday. I have enormous ski boots (Scarpa TX Pro) and have no problem getting any of my things in there.

I suppose the next generation Stoic duffel could use a U-shaped zip-around top that doesn't compromise the seams on either end. That should let people fit their tents and sleeping pads without lengthening the zipper. Or make the zipper diagonal across the top. No one's done it--doesn't mean Stoic can't change things up.

(0)

 

0 Comments

mnichols

mnicholswrote a review of on July 6, 2006

5 5

The Revelation 45L Backpack has all the accoutrements necessary for a good slog in the backcountry. With a sleeping bag and pad, however, you'll be hard-pressed to fit much else inside. Your stove equipment and (limited) supplies of food and water will top it off, depending on personal preferences/necessities for pad length, bag size, etc. The pack compensates on the outside, allowing you, the backcountry skier/mountaineer, to load skis, crampons, multiple ice tools, and a shovel.

For peak baggers, the pack can be used specifically for summit pushes. Take out the frame and leave it at home; it's not a very large pack, the frame is (quite visibly) flimsy, and removing the frame makes the pack surprisingly compactable. It can then be stuffed into a bigger, burlier approach pack.

The pockets on the waist belt are barely large enough to fit your inedible "energy" bars, so they will be better suited to carrying chapstick, whistle, knife, and other small items.

Happy hunting.

(0)

 

0 Comments