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Jean F.'s Passions

Camping

Jean F.'s Bio

law2674974

law2674974 wrote a review of on July 10, 2013

1 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've loved this light tent for 6 seasons of backpacking (spring, summer, fall) in the Rockies up until this past weekend. Sadly, "soggy bivouac," as used in the product description above, is what I endured through a long night of thunderstorm heavy downpours with hail and ~5 hours of rain. Either it's never rained this hard since I've been using the tent, and/or the fabric or waterproofing has degraded over time because up until this past trip, it's never leaked more than a few droplets. Beware! If it rains hard or for long, you and your gear WILL get wet--not just damp but WET-- like a cheapo dept. store tent. This one is now relegated to the junk pile, as I cannot justify the weight of even this light tent that does not protect me from rain. I suppose it still provides overpriced, overweight bug protection.

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law2674974

law2674974 wrote a review of on March 22, 2012

3 5

After using these for 3 seasons, I think these are an improvement over my old leather boots for backcountry touring, but if I plan to do much telemark turning/downhill, I wear much stiffer plastic 2-buckle Garmont Veloce tele boots on same b/c skis. I bought these to replace old leather tele boots that I could never lace tightly enough and were too stiff through the toe/forefoot (smashed toe joints, blistered toes & heels). PROs: 2 buckle straps do an excellent job of holding my heel tightly in the boot for diagonal stride, moreso than the old leather boots (no heel blisters); ankle support is excellent; lighter weight and more flexible than leather regardless of temperature; warm enough for me. CONs: too flexible in the forefoot for good control on tele turns, as noted by others; fit too snugly throughout incl. toe box, as noted by others, and must wear thinner socks; feet get wet on warmer wet snow days (unlike my waxed leather boots).

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law2674974

law2674974 wrote a review of on September 6, 2011

4 5

Been using the previous style of this--stood up tall "portrait" orientation--for 5 years of backpacking, and it has been overall well worth the money, more durable than it looks, easy to use and clean. Just this weekend a pinhole developed in the bottom corner of my 5-yr-old bag, so will replace it with this new style if I cannot repair the leak myself. Turning the old version on its side ("landscape" orientation) should cure the old problem of being top heavy and occasionally spontaneously falling over unless on absolutely level surface or less than full. The old-style too-stiff zip-closure top never worked more than a few times but turns out I really didn't need it, anyway--just folded over top to keep out leaves and bugs (maybe this new version zip closure is improved?). I attached a leash to the cap to prevent losing it.

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law2674974

law2674974 wrote a review of on June 3, 2009

4 5

I've been using a self-inflating ThermaRest pad for ~15+ years, and it's the best, most comfortable sleeping pad I've found. That said, over time my pads (2) have developed pinhole slow leaks that I've tried to patch with ThermaRest's patch kit--not very successful, probably because it's difficult to locate the pinhole leaks. I did successfully replace the valve I crushed using their kit. But, I'd still buy another Thermarest, if I can't get the leaks patched in my old one. Well worth the money and extra weight over a closed cell foam pad.

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law2674974

law2674974 wrote a review of on June 3, 2009

2 5

I got the RidgeRest for its light weight and low maintenance, for which I can recommend it. However, I spent several miserable, minimal sleep nights on it. Maybe I'm just too old and fat/heavy for these closed-cell pads anymore, but this provided little more comfort than sleeping directly on the ground. I got up tired, aching, stiff, grumpy, and wondering why the heck I ever liked backpacking. I went back to using the heavier but far more comfortable and cushioning self-inflating pad. For a weekend warrior like me (just a night or two per trip--perhaps not enough time to "get used to it" as other reviewers noted), the extra ounces are well worth the decent night's sleep--without a decent sleep, I don't want to backpack.

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