jonp256383

jonp256383

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jonp256383

jonp256383 wrote a review of on May 15, 2013

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The gloves are comfortable and dexterous, and offer good knuckle protection for climbing. However they have a few major issues.

1. Like some other BD gloves, the fleece lining is not well sewn to the shell and will pull out in a twisted mess when removing the glove, then making it difficult to get them back on.
2. fingertips are poorly shaped
3. During their second year the shell started to soak up more and more water. This should be fine because the gloves are impermeable, thanks to a (think plastic bag) barrier. However once the outer shell gets wet and then freezes, much of the gloves' warmth and flexibility is compromised. Additionally, the impermeable barrier keeps any sweat in the glove and makes them EXTREMELY difficult to dry out on multiday ski/climbing tours. I've gotten them wet, kept them in my sleeping bag all night, and then found them wet in the morning. My $12 dollar fleece gloves proved to be warmer and more useful for the remainder of the tour.

Great ice/mixed cragging glove if youve got a warm house for a base camp. I now prefer softshells or a system glove for anything else.

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jonp256383

jonp256383 wrote a review of on May 15, 2013

4 5

Picked it up used, patched the holes, and got to work. Its lasted through 3 more years of all-season abuse. Really light, obviously does not stand up well to sharp metal:::: storage of A-framed skis, or crampons. the light fabric has been shredded and repatched several times. all the buckles, joints, straps, and zippers have held up well though. Have used it for excursions lasting up to 5 days, alot of stuff will fit in this thing despite it's designation as a 'large-daypack'. Perfectly suited to day pack use as well. Not comfortable when loaded heavy, but this is not what it's for. Very comfortable when climbing.

The bivy pad is easy to remove, I cut an old sleeping pad with a thicker and stiffer foam into the same shape and replaced it. This improved comfort and support, as well as shiver-bivy capability.

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jonp256383

jonp256383 wrote a review of on May 14, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have used these tools on steep water ice, mixed cragging, dry tooling, and long mountain routes. They perform well everywhere, and the modular options are always interesting as you can suit the tool to any task. They are light yet very durable, despite many scratches, i never fear to torque them at strange angles. I have borrowed friends' tools only to take mine back for their perfect swing. They excel at classical alpine climbing with a healthy mix of snow plunging, moderate ice, and scrappy mixed.

-a few drawbacks: They are not well suited to steep water ice, there is not enough curve in the shaft and not enough weight in the head. the 'massolettes' improved this department slightly but in the future I will consider a more adapted tool.

-The attatchments are not particularly functional. I have not had to chop a ledge with my adze, but I imagine it would be ridiculous. I always dread pounding a pin with the petite hammer, it it not very effective.

-The trigrest seems like a good idea, but as a matter of personal preference I hate having a trigger on a tool. It is uncomfortable and as it wears out it will begin to slip. I have no need to adjust the position of my grip during a climb. I removed mine in favor of standard secondary griprest.

*for matching, cheap athletic tape improves the feel alot, twist the tape to make ergonomic finger ridges underneath the main layer.

-Poor fist/knuckle protection when swinging over bulges, again a steep ice problem.

But all in all these have been perfect alpine tools and I could not be more happy with them.

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