Jon J

Jon J

Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on September 9, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

These are a great lightweight pad for pedaling all day in, or keeping in your pack and putting on for the descent. The knee pad is a softer foam, not an ABS or VPD like other offerings, but whats lost in padding is gained in mobility. These are great for keeping your skin on as opposed to taking hard direct impacts..

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on August 6, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've been really pleased with the Ion shorts. They have the pockets that the Fox and Giro shorts I own always leave me wanting to throw my keys and phone in on the way to the ride. While I haven't ridden with anything in the pockets (load up the hydro pack), the rear waist pocket is the most out of the way, the thigh pockets lay flat and could hold a gel or bar without issue, but that'd be it in my opinion. Fit on these shorts is great, the size is my true waist fit, and they feature adjusters, so if you're on the line, you can size up and cinch them down. Other overshorts I have hang low in the crotch and will snag on the back of my seat when I'm behind the saddle on steep descents, not an issue with the Ions. The included liner chamois is ok. It'd be fine for 1-2 hour rides, but I'll be using other bibs under the Ions for longer efforts. The Ions are a great, lightweight, overshort and for the price, I'd consider the included liner a bonus.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on April 3, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

These are very similar to the Fox Launch Pro and the Troy Lee T-Bone. A little lower profile than the Foxs, and similar in fit and comfort. Top and bottom velcro closures make them stay in place when pedaling. Haven't had them out on a super long effort or a hot day, so not sure on breathability.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on April 3, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

While longer/taller than the One Industries Enemy and the 661 Comp am knee guards, these seem more comfortable to pedal in. The side and rear material is ergo formed and very pliable out of the bag. The upper and lower velcro traps make a secure and comfortable fit. Similar options would be the Kali Protectives Aazis Soft Knee Guard and the Troy Lee T-Bone

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on March 19, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

These are without a doubt the lowest profile, most comfortable knee pads to pedal in. They do fit snug, and you definitely can't just "pull them on" as another review said. I have to inch mine on, but once they're in place, they stay there. The G-forms trade bulk/padding for mobility, so if you're going nuts out there, you may want to look at other offerings, the Fox Launch Pro is one I'm a fan of.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on March 17, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

The guys at Intense were cool enough to let us in on this secret a little early, and I was able to get out for a morning on the new Tracer 275 Carbon. I had ridden the Carbine 275 Carbon last summer, as well as the SC Bronson, while both capable, the VPP suspension has always seemed very dependent on the CTD functions, and just never "snappy" enough with regard to power transfer from the pedals. I won't lie, my first impression of the bike without riding it was, "great, another longer travel VPP bike", thankfully the Tracer 275 proved me wrong.
Before riding that morning, I took a harder look at the Tracer's geo. The 66.5 head angle, 4.5" head tube, 17" chain stays, and 13.5" BB height all had me liking what I saw. Once on the trail, the Tracer 27.5 kept those good vibes going. The claimed weight of the Pro complete bike is 28 lbs, my SB95c weighs in at 26.5lbs, but the Tracer didn't pedal like is was 1.5lbs heavier, and pedaled noticeably lighter than the Bronson. The real surprise was the Monarch Plus rear shock, it provided great power transfer and didn't move in standing efforts (disclosure, I'm 5'7"/140lbs). I left the shock in the open position the whole ride w/ 30% sag. Climbing up the Tracer did well, the 160 Pike only wandered going up the steepest sections. Overall the Tracer was the best climbing VPP bike I've been on, beating the Bronson and the 5010/Solo in terms of pedal induced shock movement.
Descending is what this bike is built to do, and it doesn't disappoint. The aforementioned geometry makes for a stable, snappy ride that handles the steeps without issue. The Reverb stealth dropper post, the ever capable Pike fork, and the Monarch Plus shock worked in harmony to handle the roughest sections of trail, and left me thinking, "I don't even need to pick a line!".
The build kits on the Tracer are what I see a lot of people speci'ng their custom builds with. X01 1x11, Shimano brakes, wide bars/short stem, dropper post, and stout wheels/tires.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on January 15, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I used the Crosspoint Wind Gloves for the last few months here in Salt Lake City. My hand measures 7" from base of my palm to the tip of my middle finger. I went with a medium, and it fits well. I still have the dexterity to shift without issue, and have extra room for a liner glove on really cold days. Temperature wise, I've ridden these on cold windy days with the air temp probably close to freezing. My hands weren't numb or uncomfortably cold, but I could feel a chill. I'd say I'm more temperature sensitive than most, especially regarding my hands. With liner gloves I've XC skied with these in the teens and 20's.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on November 12, 2013

Super Bike Indeed!
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've ridden Yetis for the past ten years, starting with the long defunct alloy Kokopelli, and then moving to the hard to replace ASR5 Carbon. Yeti's Switch technology suspension design has always been one I've been high on. After demoing a number of 29ers from other brands, the SB95 and the switch suspension felt the best in my opinion. Power input to the pedals feels very direct and responsive to provide a snappy acceleration, and the 5 inches of travels feels endless. I'm 5'7" and 140lbs and can ride almost exclusively in the descend setting. I ride a small size frame with a 70mm stem and a 140mm RS Pike out front. This bike RIPS!

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on November 3, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I was right at the top end measure for the small size based on my thigh (10cm above kneecap). I tried the smalls and they fit too tight around my lower thigh, couldn't get my full range of motion wearing them. Going to give the mediums a go. Protection wise these seem solid, and the top and bottom straps give you some room for adjustment.

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Jon J

Jon J wrote a review of on October 29, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have the sleeveless and long sleeve versions of this base layer. I'm 5'7", 140lbs, and the small fits well next to my skin, but isn't uncomfortably tight. While other base layers use more technical fabrics, the polyester material this piece uses is comfortable next to your skin, and effectively wicks moisture away. I've used the long sleeve under a Gore Phantom jacket and been comfortable in the high 30s, and have used the sleeveless in 80 degree weather under a short sleeve jersey.

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