jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480

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Joshua's Passions

Hiking & Camping

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0 Answers

jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on January 14, 2011

Regular softboots work fine, and no, you do not have to unscrew anything to use the ski function...

for some reason I feel compelled to tell you this is not a "if you want to ski one day, and snowboard the next" tool. It's a "ski mode for CLIMBING, and Snowboard mode for descending tool".

Hope this helps.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote a review of on February 19, 2010

5 5

This is absolutely the best bag I've ever owned. I still have a 0 degree bag that I bought at REI 2 years ago but have not used it once since I bought this. I've slept in this bag down to 10 degrees and with a hat on my head and a baselayer on I slept like a baby. I'm a cold sleeper too! When push comes to shove I'm sure it wouldn't be comfortable, but in a snow trench and a bivy with all my insulating layers on I'm sure I could handle 0 degree temps in this bag, and all at a pound and a half (regular)!!!!!

I've also slept in 50degree temps using this bag loosely draped like a comforter. It breathes really well and if you're willing to lug an extra half pound you can save yourself 400 bucks for a lightweight down summer bag too!

I can't say enough good things about this bag. Worth every penny and making the bomber reputation of WM even better.

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0 Comments

jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on February 17, 2010

"A solid understanding of preliminary searching and following proper backcountry protocol of only one person on a slope at a time makes range a non issue."

Tell that to an SAR professional on a recovery mission!

But, then again, I hadn't heard any complaints about it's range from before this, and this is one of the most popular beacons in use right now IMO.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on February 17, 2010

yeah you can remove all the hardwear, but dollar to donuts you'll just cough up another 150 and have a 2 splitty quiver!

Cutting the board cleanly is half the battle. An old splitboard is like a longboard (surfboard), you'll never need more than 5 minutes to find somebody who wants to borrow and tour with you!

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on January 31, 2010

You can ski 'em. But other than those long approaches with lots of rolling terrain, you wouldn't want to. I've seen guys rip tele-turns on splitters just to prove it can be done.

You can meadowskip all day though, and if you do alpine turns (carefully, there's no way to lock your heel down) you do indeed have a shaped edge to turn off of on your downhill foot.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on January 31, 2010

spare parts at voile, like Cory said, but you don't need to buy that piece, just tie a loop of shock-cord around the pin and girth hitch to your binding. The cables suck anyway. Shockcord should be inspected from time to time, but it holds up a long time and is a cheap easy fix.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on January 31, 2010

"I really want to stop carrying my board on my back!"

That's exactly why you should by a splitty and don't worry about the transition times. There are tons of guys using this board in the sierra where the seasons go 6 months long and the conditions range from powder to (particularly in the spring) icy in the am to corn in the pm. So yeah, guys (and girls!) are riding these things and traveling on them in all conditions.

Transition time vs. skiers...a bit slower. Practice speeds it up though and if you just get to the transition area a minute before your skier friend you'll mititgate the difference anyway. It's minor..unless you're out trying to keep up with some rando racers, you'll be fine.

I've yet to meet a splitter who would ever go back to snow shoes unless it's a coolie straight up without any approach, even then, most will skin the apron and switch to boots.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote a review of on January 6, 2010

4 5

Good pants for all around usage. I wear them mountain biking on cool days, cragging, hiking (again on cool days), and skiing. My only suggestion to Patagonia would be some sort of ventilation preferably on the sides, but inner thigh ala mt. hardwear. would work too. The DWR coating is amazingly h20 repellent, on my last tour I sloshed a little water out of my water bottle and watched the droplets literally BOUNCE off of the fabric.Water repellent and breathable, they fit great too. Mine have been fairly durable as well since I once gouged my quad with a whippet pick but it didn't pierce the fabric of the pant.

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0 Comments

jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on December 21, 2009

It doesn't say that at all in the description. This is as close as it gets and it's quite vague: " The S-Series takes a standard Voile split binding setup (sold separately)"

I was asking an honest question before dropping 7 bills on a splitboard and have been splitting for several years, your tone is neither helpful NOR appreciated. Thumbs down!!!

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on July 16, 2009

Shovel Pocket is INSIDE the pack in the WET side of the WET/DRY DIVIDER. Your shovel handle and probe both have homes in there as well. No need to strap the shovel to the outside of the pack unless you're overloading it in the first place....

It IS a very roomy daypack, but an overnight would be a tight squeeze even with ultra light/compact gear.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on June 1, 2009

Hey Eric, maybe it's popular for top roping without a backup belayer? It's not such a mystery afterall! I know when I have a new belayer I appreciate the autolocking function!

That said, if you're alpine/ice climbing or glacier walking, the thinner rope you're probably using is very manageable with this device! So this device and the grigri have different applications, choose the appropriate device for your purposes!

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on April 22, 2009

Bionic is quite a bit heavier, and not as breathable. The gore windstopper on the marmot also appears to repel water better imho (I own them both). The biggest difference is the stretch panel/breathability of the marmot.

In general, if it's cold out and I'm riding lifts, not aerobic, I'd probably opt for the Apex. If I'm doing anything at all aerobic, or layering, I opt for the leadville. Hope this helps.

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jbaysurfer872480

jbaysurfer872480 wrote an answer about on April 22, 2009

I think you should be confortable down to 0 degrees with that system WITHOUT the front point down jacket.

2 layers of down is for some seriously cold temps. You should leave the front point at home and get a gore shell. The "wet" part of your conditions pretty much mandate it.

You could also forego this jacket as a layer and just keep your front point in the pack for when you're sedentary, but if you want to wear a down layer all the time this is probably the right jacket.

Clear as mud? Here's my system YMMV:

Base: short sleeve polypro, long sleeve patagonia zip neck polypro (thin kind with a silverish reflective fabric), Marmot Leadville softshell jacket with gore windstopper, OR Mentor jacket with gore pro-shell and this jacket as my down layer. This jacket will usually be worn over my gore shell (when I stop to rest), but if it's butt cold I'll go ahead and put it underneath the gore shell and keep it on all day.

This system keeps me comfortable easily to zero degrees (actual temp NOT windchill), and the windstopper and gore layers prevent any other windchill issues.

If it's gonna be below zero I'll substitute this jacket out for my Mountain Hardwear Phantom jacket, which is much loftier but about 3/4 lb. heavier.

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