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James's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Paddling

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on October 13, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: True to size

A number of years ago I swore off capilene because it always developed a strong odor when I sweat in it. That no longer seems to be the case. I've sweated a bunch in this shirt and after multiple uses it still smells new. So far I've worn in directly under a 2 1/2 layer rain garment where it wicks very well. I've worn in as an outer garment in 45 degree weather and find it extremely warm for its weight. I've worn it under a fleece under a rain garment and found it wicks extremely well. I've used it as a sleeping shirt in my sleeping bag. I've even worn it under a scuba diving dry suit where it was awesome. Similar to another reviewer I weigh 160 and stand 5' 10" and find the size medium to be a perfect fit. This has become my go to garment for rainy conditions in the mid 30's. I would recommend it to anyone for any cool to cold weather activity.

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on November 30, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

With all the great reviews there's little I can add. I wear nothing but Ex Officio underwear. They are great for backpacking as I can get buy with one, at most two, pairs. They are great for kayaking as they drive super fast. I even wear them under my fire department bunker gear (though nylon is prohibited) thinking that if it ever gets that hot down there I'm in serious trouble anyway! Buy with confidence.

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote an answer about on October 6, 2012

I own the Easton Kilo 2P and can attest to the fact that there is plenty of footroom for my Marmot Plasma long sleeping bag with plenty of room left over. I can't conceive of a use for that space. I have another tent, a Hilleberg Atko which I dearly love but it tapers down to less than a foot on both ends. The result with that tent and many others that have copied the Atko design is confined space on BOTH ends which results in you breathing right on the tent material. Having the "sit up" space on one end rather than in the middle seems to make more sense too. I can sit up, crawl out of my sleeping bag, dress, turn around, stick my feet in the vestibule and boot up. The end tapered down also greatly improves the Kilo's ability to deal with wind. It doesn't seem to flap as much when pitched with the low end into the wind. I've found very few flaws with this tent. It is MUCH improved over the original Kilo.

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on October 5, 2012

Great three season tent
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I replaced my original Easton Kilo with the new upgraded version and the improvements were fantastic. Contrary to Backcountry.com's claim that this is a freestanding tent it is not. I find it easier to pitch by first installing the color coded poles (improvement over old model) and THEN staking it out. When placing the fly one must be careful to hook the velcro fasteners (two on each side of the cross pole and two on the long pole. It does take a little practice to get the pitch correct otherwise the long pole "warps" and causes the interior to sag. I found it best to attach the front end of the fly, then the back end and then snug the rest. I would recommend that Easton add at least one more velcro attachment to the long pole and also add two more stakeout loops for the mesh body of the tent. Although this is rated as a two person tent I can't imagine two people in here even with the larger vestibule (improvement over original model).
I spent five nights in near zero temperatures and some strong winds and the tent weathered all of that with no real problems. I did note that the interior mesh part of the tent sagged a tiny bit but I attributed that to the 8 degree temps it was exposed to - what doesn't shrink in those kind of temps and this is rated as a three season tent not a four season. The fly was coated with frost on two of those nights but every other tent in my group of backpackers had the same problem so I don't see venting as a particular problem right now. All in all I give this a five star rating and only suggest two minor improvements

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on September 22, 2011

4 5

I bought this tent for the light weight, I didn't want nor need a two person tent. That having been said, if you're looking at this as a two person tent, my advice would be to look further. I sold a Hilleberg Rajd tent to fund this purchase and, so far, I have no real regrets. The Rajd was a single wall and I'll never, ever again own a single wall tent. Condensation is a huge problem with those tents; so far, not a problem with the Kilo.

As I said, this is definitely not a two person tent. My sleeping pad occupies almost the whole length of the tent and its width takes up the entire space at the foot of the tent. I have no ideal where Easton thinks another person could fit in! The "vestibule" is tiny; about all its good for is to put your boots in. Anything larger and you'd be rubbing up against the fly and inviting leaks. With just one person in the tent there is enough space on either side of you to place your pack and other things.

I am essentially a Hilleberg person where the fly is the tent and the canopy hangs onto the fly so I'm having some growing pains getting used to pitching the canopy and then attaching a fly. I had some minor problems getting the fly to pitch tight as would be needed to shed water. When I have the fly tight as I would like it the poles tend to bend a little off center but that's probably just operator error. It seems to me that I use all of the adjustment in the fly attach points to get a tight pitch. I did use the guyouts although the line adjusters are rather cheezy. I spent two nights in the tent up in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness and it worked great in cool, damp conditions with no condensate forming on the inner side of the fly while all the leaves around me were quite damp. I'll keep posting as I learn more.

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on September 11, 2011

5 5

It is what it is a superlite footprint. Appears to be constructed from the same lightweight flooring material as the Easton Mountain Kilo Tent. The fly weighs right at five ounces for those who are concerned with weight.

Backcountry had this to say about this particular footprint:
"You can also use it to turn your Kilo fly into a fast-pitch, ridiculously-lightweight shelter that will keep you dry but won't weigh you down."

For the life of me I can not figure out how they would do that as the poles appear to be integral to the canopy of the tent not the fly!

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on August 29, 2011

5 5

Like a previous reviewer I found this to be a very light tent. First thing I did was to study these remarkable poles which zre manufactured in Easton's facility in Utah. Ive got another tent with CF poles but these are even lighter. They snap together quite easily and almost float out of your hand. One minor glitch, the bag they come in is a smidge too short to completely enclose the poles no matter how hard I try. Now its on to the tent itself. Both the canopy and fly are sown in Vietnam, a place, I'm told is second to none for fabric work. It certainly shows! The fly is almost Gossamer in its lightness. Doesn't appear to be a stitch out of place on fly or canopy. Pitching insructions are not enclosed but a quick trip to the website and I was good to go. After tent was all pitched I noted 3 guyout points on fly not mentioned in instructions. I was pleased to find these Spectra lines enclosed in the stake bag. The fly attaches at these 3 points to the poles and is easily hooked to the stakeout points. I used almost all of the fly tension adjustment to stretch the fly so I'm hoping there is'nt a lot, if any sag when the fly gets damp. All in all this appears to be a very well built
and very light tent. Sizewise it would be cramped
for two; for one, as I intend to use it, it is palatial. Going to take it up to the Cabinet Mountains this week for its inagural run and I'm excited!

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j_amess2184846

j_amess2184846 wrote a review of on June 14, 2010

5 5

My Fire Department just began a swift water rescue program. I bought this kayak with the sole purpose of training in whitewater kayaking in the type of boat we use. I am a rank amateur when it comes to inflatable kayak use and I have to say that it would be tough for a beginner to "hop in the water for the first time and navigate a class 3 rapid without tipping." That having been said after one day of training I was able to easily surf this boat in holes and standing waves but I don't think I could have run a class three rapid. With three days of practice and a little more instruction I'm now up to that level but I've dumped it a number of times to get there. This boat is light and easily carried to the water by one person. It has a huge number of tie down loops along both sides and the included deluxe Cheetah seat is great. Someone else said get the thigh straps and foot pegs and I would concur with that assessment. I now have thigh straps and with their use I don't tip. I've not installed the foot pegs as yet and just jam my feet between the side tube and the floor for the time being. I would recommend a paddle length of at least 200 (that's what I use and it seems a skosh short) and maybe all the way up to 210 or so. Great boat, my son in law will inherit it someday!

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