ingulule

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ingulule

ingulule wrote a review of on September 6, 2007

3 5

...and you'll find it comes in second. I have had them both and would recommend the eos only for non-alpine use in clement conditions. It does all right in the wet though due to decent ventilation and steep walls, but fly does not come far enough down - there is spray against the inner tent in windy/wet conditions. Fly actually has a plastic "window" (usually not shown on images shown online - probably for a reason) and a ventilation flap, compromising stability when trying to stake it down taut (not that easy in the first place due to shape and the few available stake loops or attachments for lines, respectively). Vestibule has only one stake loop (2 on the hubba - apart from less stability this means you can only have one (always the same) side of the vestibule open, if you want to have it staked down). Pole is really lightweight - true! - but to the point of somewhat flimsy. Wind is a real concern considering the wide arch lengthwise and the lack of lines on the sides. With the weak pole and limited guy-out line attachments, make sure you know where the wind is blowing from. Talking about the pole: Slightly asymmetrical design of the pole makes it tricky to set up tent in the dark (if you do it the wrong way you'll bend/break this pole easily). Note that the asymmetry is not plainly obvious! You have to match color codes on pole feet and stake loops to get it right, can't just eyeball it. In addition, the two joints of the pole have an upper and lower side. Setting up the tent, you not only have to figure out left and right, but also upper and lower of the joints. Compare this to the Hubba: as long as the long axis of the pole matches that of the tent, you are ok (hey: it's only 1 of you, dark and windy...). By the way, the Hubba can be freestanding with the fly alone, whereas the Eos cannot (fly attaches with buckles to inner tent, not directly with grommets to the pole - for the Eos, putting up fly without inner tent requires use of footprint that provides the grommets).

Bottom line: Eos is ok for use in calm, non alpine conditions. If you need something more sturdy that can take some serious wind - consider the MSR Hubba (very similar design, price, weight - just without the flimsiness of the Eos).

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ingulule

ingulule wrote a review of on September 4, 2007

5 5

This is a great little tent and well worth the extra pound or so that it adds to a bivy. It's advertized as a 3 season tent, so it gets my 5* for that. Very easy to set up, excellent quality of material and workmanship. The benefits of the "swivel pole" though are debatable: true, it increases space around your head - but it also makes the pole more bulky to pack, increases overall weight and, worst of all, it makes the top of the tent flat: not desirable in rainy or snowy conditions. Adequate number of guy-out line attachments renders the Hubba reasonably stable in windy conditions. Fly can be set up freestanding without need of footprint (contrary to description). Fly comes down reasonably far (could be improved). Could pass for a 4 season tent without the swivel pole but a few more line attachments instead, additional loops to stake it down taut, and a solid fabric inner tent with decent ventilation instead of the simple net fabric. If windy weather is a consideration and you are comparing the Hubba to the Marmot Eos, Hubba wins hands down.

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