har4190168

har4190168

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Review flagged as About a sale, not the product.. Click here to view.

har4190168

har4190168 wrote an answer about on October 20, 2011

As a Clydesdale, your concern ridding needs to be on rims and tire psi. A wider tire will slow you down, add stability, but not impact your weight on it. A lighter rider can use a lower PSI tire, i shop for the highest I can find; Im switching to tubular zipp firecrest this year for this. I weigh in at 230lbs and still ride a 700x20, I hate 23s. A rule of thumb is you PSI rating should be 80% of your body weight, we are screwed.

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har4190168

har4190168 wrote an answer about on May 30, 2011

L/R foot is designated by the straps going to the outside; you should be able to use them in reverse if you want, but it would be difficult to put them on and off. Also some newer shoes have the foot cup more specific so there is a specific L/R.
The heal lift is for balance and foot position, critical for when carrying a pack and on steep climbs; on long days I have used the option on flats to just stretch my calves out. I wouldn't buy full size snow shoes without them, I have a pair of small rad feathers for running, but that's another ball game.

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har4190168

har4190168 wrote an answer about on May 24, 2011

It depends on your boot, but most likely yes. Just for comfort though, I recommend lighter shoes you can stop in your pack on the red down. From experience even mountaineering boots feel heavy fast in snow shoes. If the tempeature allows, I often use Saucony Pro Grid Razor winter trail running shoes just for contort. If you are not below zero, bring an extra pair of socks and go without them; they are waterproof and warm, just a low 'ankle' cut.

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