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greg

greg

Pacific Northwest

Greg's Passions

Alpine Touring
Camping
Backpacking
Mountain Biking
Snowshoeing
Ice Climbing
Alpine Skiing
Mountaineering
Kayaking

Greg's Bio

I enjoy cooking,building and creating.


I am a total smart ass and I don't like being like other people. I hope my reviews show that.


Through much debate and group counseling it has been determined I am a gear whore.. Not a hoarder per say, but at some point it becomes a bit ridiculous. How many DH bikes does someone need? How many spare parts? How many sleeping bags? How many stoves? How many tents? How many jackets? Is there really a good answer? I don't think there is a good number based upon the different seasons and all the places to go and explore. Plus, new tempting stuff keeps coming out all the time. FML .


*SPECIAL NOTE* I admire and respect many of you out there. But I shouldn't be surprised that I piss off many of the uptight douchewads that frequent this site or the ones I see when out and about. You know.. Like the members of the mountaineers club, The ass licks who are REI members. Not to mention the tree hugging hippie fuckers that have a stick lodged in their ass sideways. Yep, you hate me and I hate you guys too. I will be the guy out on the trail or the guy having a good time with my friends, then when you come up to another group with your holier than thou attitude I will be the guy telling you to get bent, or go into graphic detail where and how you can go fuck yourself. I am always amazed when I see people who think they have some sort of say over others when out in the middle of nowhere. And let's not forget here on the internet.

greg

greg wrote a review of on February 17, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

We got these for our trip to Hawaii. They were actually very nice to have when going to the beach and going to the pool in the evenings.

My wife started using her bag for a daily bag just knocking around. The external zippered pocket is great for holding money, keys or any small items.

They aren't big enough for the fins we own for snorkeling but for a mask and snorkel along with a towel and sunscreen and even room for our underwater camera it was a decent way to go.

The cords aren't the best for being a bit burnt and having too much weight in them.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 31, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Can't do a great tune without a gummy. I use them for part of the polishing process and for detuning the tip and tail.

It is part of the process. I have my fresh gummies and I have my old gummies. As they wear out I pass them onto doing tip and tail detuning where they get the big V's in them.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 31, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Chrome files are the best files for ski tuning. They will cut through small burs and hardened spots on your ski edge much better than an ordinary steel file.

I don't like using the roller guide contraptions that many companies have come up with in place of a bare file. I don't mind the shims for the base. Some people bend their files for doing the base edge. Don't.. If anything wrap a piece of paper on one end of your file, building it up to get your desired angle and just pull it straight down the ski.
For doing the side edges I use a black marker and color the entire side edge metal. It gives me a color difference to look at when I angle the file slightly and I can see how much material I need to take off to get the correct angle.

*Don't use a file on your skis every time you want to sharpen your edges. That is what diamond files and wet stones are for. You just need to get any burs off and get them polished again. The file is mainly for getting the correct angles on your edges.* If your skis edges are hosed then let a shop belt the base and edges, then use your file to get the desired angles again, do periodic edge maintenance but not with a file.

With a correctly polished ski edge you should be able to grab the ski and pull your hand down the entire length and not get cut or get any burs or shavings into your hand.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 31, 2013

4 5

Yeah, you are going to need these too. I have used old MTB inner tubes cut 1" wide and used them the same way. Especially if I am doing a multitude of skis at once. When waxing or tuning skis it is about easy repetition. having all the skis you are going to wax at once with the brakes out of the way makes it go much easier.

These are great for keeping your ski brakes out of the way.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 30, 2013

5 5

We had a Toko auto hot wax machine at the shop I worked at. The other shops in town used a friction wheel for their cheap hot waxes.
The cloth the Toko machine used was just like the Swix cloth.

Use very little wax and clean your bases at the same time.
I melt and drip small drops down the length of the each ski and then do a fairly slow pass down the length of the ski with the bare iron. The hazing of the wax should follow about 3 to 4 inches behind the iron but try not to go over more than 5 inches trailing behind the iron. it is amount of heat and the speed in which you drag the iron. Do not make your iron so hot that it smokes you out of the room and don't heat your bases up so much that the wax stays wet for minutes or longer. I then take my paper and role out a length at the tip and set the iron on it. Let it heat up and start to pull the iron down the length of the ski while pulling the section of cloth simultaneously in between the iron and ski At the end of the ski you will see all the dirt and contaminants embedded in the cloth and it will be wet with wax as you pull it past the tail. Depending on how dirty the cloth is I will either use it to clean the other ski or tear it off and use a clean strip and do another pass down the same ski, then I will use that length on the next ski getting the clean strip dirty and keep repeating until the cloth comes up only wet. I never use base cleaners on skis unless they need base welding. Then I only use the base cleaner on the area being welded.

You can either use a wax scraper and then a brush if you are racing to get all the extra wax off your bases or if you are a recreational skier I just use a 3M scotch brite pad and give the skis a quick wipe leaving a thin film of wax on the skis.

Your wax will last so much longer and you won't have all the wax shavings all over the place.

This cloth should be an essential for anyone doing their own hot waxes.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I tuned skis for a living back in the day.

I sold so many of these to clients and taught them how to do simple things to keep their skis running like after a fresh tune up.Plus, it just adds life to your skis by not doing more to them than something so basic.

If you smack or scrape your edge you will need one of these to get through the hardened metal bur. Between this file and a wet stone you can keep your edges looking like new and not needing some idiot running a file down the entire edge. or throwing it onto a belt.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

A must for shimano chains. Super simple to use and the only correct way to put your shimano chain together correctly.

It is also the reason I try to stay away from shimano chains for DH. I would rather use the power link or others chain connectors. Much less of a hassle.

For road bikes I stick with a shimano chain when using shimano components.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

I have fixed so many peoples brakes at the races we have put on and even before epic rides we have taken.
Even if you don't know how to bleed your own brakes don't add insult to injury when you show up and there is a person that can bleed them but you aren't even prepared enough to supply your own fluid.
This should be part of anyones tool kit if you own shimano hydraulic brakes. Oh, and keep an extra pair of brake pads with you too.

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greg

greg wrote an answer about on December 29, 2013

It looks the same but backcountry uses a different sku#
This what the AK 38 has in it;
Contents of the AK-38:

AWS-1 4, 5, 6mm Hex Wrench Set
AWS-3 2, 2.5, 3mm Y Hex Wrench Set
BBT-9 Bottom Bracket for 16 notch external crankset system cups (SRAM, Shimano, FSA, Truvativ, Race Face, Zipp, etc)
BBT-22 Cartridge Bottom Bracket Tool (for 20 tooth internal splines, such as Shimano�, FSA�, etc.)
BO-2 Bottle Opener
CBW-1 8 and 10mm Open End Wrench
CBW-4 9 and 11mm Open End Wrench
CC-3.2 Chain Checker Chain Wear Indicator
CL-1 Synthetic Blend Chain Lube
CM-5.2 Cyclone Chain Cleaner
CN-10 Cable and Housing Cutter
CNW-2 Chainring Nut Wrench
CT-3.2 Professional Screw Type Chain Tool
CWP-7 Crank Puller for Splined Octalink�, ISIS Drive�, and square-taper type
FR-5 Cassette Lockring Tool for Shimano� and similar brands
GSC-1 GearClean Brush
HT-8 8mm Hex Tool
PPL-1 PolyLube 1000 Grease
PW-3 Pedal Wrench
SCW-13 13mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-14 14mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-15 15mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-16 16mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-17 17mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-18 18mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-19 19mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SD-0 Shop Screwdriver #0 Phillips
SD-2 Shop Screwdriver #2 Phillips
SD-3 Shop Screwdriver Straight Blade 3mm tip
SD-6 Shop Screwdriver Straight Blade, 6mm tip
SR-11 5 to 11-Speed Compatible Chain Whip/Sprocket Remover
SW-0 Professional Spoke Wrench
SW-2 Professional Spoke Wrench
TB-2 Tire Boot
TL-6 Tire Levers
TWS-3 T10, T25, T30: Torx� Compatible Three-Way Wrench
VP-1 Vulcanizing Patch Kit

Shipping weight: 13.7 lbs.
Box dimensions: 17.25" x 10.25" x 9.5"

They seem to be one in the same.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

I have seen a few people try and true their wheels and totally pull them out of dish.

I like my bikes to be perfect and this is a necessary tool if you want to build your own wheels and especially if you own your own truing stand.

I remember walking through the local REI getting little travel accesories before we headed for Honduras to teach DH and XC skills for two weeks and hearing one of the costumers complaining to one of their techs about how his tire was lining up between his fork legs. The idiot mechanic there was bullshitting him about how the fact his front hub had a brake rotor and it is what throws the wheel out of dish when you put the wheel and tire back into the fork. Yeah, I butted in and called bullshit all over the guy. Doing your own bike work is really the only way to avoid some idiot fucking up your bike.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

Yeah, you have great chance of screwing up your wheels but once you figure it out this is the greatest tool in any shop.

I won't bring my wheels into any shop to be built or trued. I like them perfect. Dished, trued with the tire off and the spokes tensioned.

The only way to be sure is to do it yourself. The stand will pay for itself in just a few years. if you let anyone of your buddies know you have one you will have them bumming turns using it.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Yeah, yeah... You have a pair of wire cutters already. But they won't cut as good as these. If you don't want to be a hack mechanic then get a pair of these and have zero issues with cutting cables and cable housings. And remember to crimp your end caps or have furry cable ends that will need to be replaced.

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greg

greg wrote a review of on December 29, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Even when we went to Honduras I made sure I packed this tool for putting on and removing the pedals on our bikes. A crescent wrench doesn't cut it. Have you ever seen someone whose pedal falls off while riding? Yeah, they didn't use this tool while putting on their peddles.

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