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Edwin's Passions

Hiking & Camping

Edwin's Bio

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edw3139403 wrote an answer about on April 10, 2014

I agree with Phil that 9" is about as tight as you want to get. Chances are good you'll be pushing the foot end onto the inside of the fly, hindering ventilation, and soaking up any condensation with your sleeping bag.

As far as a solo 2 person tent size... I don't make that choice even on river trips where weight isn't a serious concern. For one thing, a too-big tent won't keep you nearly as warm. I do all my backpacking in western high, dry climates and river trips in southern Utah. If I was going to be in Maine or the Olympic Peninsula, I might consider a larger shelter in case I got tent-bound for a day and also to help my clothes dry out at night.

Hope that helps.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote a review of on December 15, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

I bought this for alpine skiing and have used it twice this season so far. The first time, it was 5*F. The second time, it was 35*F. I had different base layers, but the jacket performed well under both sets of conditions. I love the hood; it fits perfectly over my helmet and it helped keep my head warm on the cold day. It detaches easily for warmer conditions.

The medium fits me well at 6'1" and 165 lbs. I was afraid the sleeves might be too short, but they're fine. Nice inner cuffs which you can pull out to ensure no gaps. The powder skirt works well and stays out of the way when you don't want it.

Lots of perfectly sized pockets in the right places. I love the left wrist pocket for my RFID season pass.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote a review of on September 15, 2012

3 5

Good construction and materials. Comfortable fabric. I wear a 34" waist and got the medium. A little big but okay in the waist and butt, long in the rise, HUGE in the thighs and the fabric sticks out to the sides above the knee. So if you like that kind of look, go for it. Otherwise, try Patagonia GI III shorts which have a much trimmer fit.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote a review of on July 14, 2012

5 5

These pants are exactly as described, including the weight, which is 10.2 oz on my scale for a men's medium. I'm 6'1", 165 lbs and the medium fits me perfectly. Lots of adjustment in the elastic draw string waist; good length over the tops of my boots but not too bunched up on the bottom. The hip length zippers make it easy to get these on and off over my size 12 mid cut hiking boots when sitting or standing. They kept me dry in a moderate rain storm. Reasonably stylish, although I use them for backpacking so don't really care how they look. Recommended.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote an answer about on February 7, 2010

I have this pack in large. It is not carry-on size. It's certainly sturdy enough to be checked by itself, but I just put it empty into a large roller bag, along with most of the stuff that will go into it once I start hiking. Easy to roll, protected, and if TSA wants to look inside after you check it, there's no problem with them trying to repack it, leaving zippers open, etc.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote a review of on February 7, 2010

5 5

Having been burned (or frozen!) by some manufacturers temperature ratings in the past, I was hoping Marmot would live up to their reputation and that this would be a true 15 degree bag. It is. I have a room over my unheated garage which I use for this sort of testing. Last night, I stabilized the room at 25 degrees and slept on the floor in the Helium on a Thermarest 3/4 Trail Lite pad, wearing socks, light-weight long underwear, and a thin long sleeved t-shirt. I woke up around 3am, checked the temperature, and it was still at 25*F. (The 25 degree room simulates sleeping in a tent with an ambient temperature of 15 degrees.)

I was warm enough all night. The bag was very comfortable, easy to zip and cinch in the dark, and the regular was long enough for me at 6'1". Good bag, works as advertised. I'll be on a 2 week trip in the Wind Rivers this summer and will post again if I learn anything new, but I expect this bag won't let me down.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote a review of on November 24, 2009

5 5

As described: a light, warm 800+ fill down sweater. Some previous reviews have raised questions about pockets, fit, and weight. So here are the facts on my men's medium which arrived Nov. 2009:
- I'm 6'1", 162 lbs and it fits just right over a t-shirt and long sleeved t-shirt. Sleeves are long enough, collar is comfy and warm when zipped up. Enough space to trap warm air, but not so big that it gets drafty when I move.
- It weighs 14.3 oz on my accurate scale.
- The outside pockets are perfect for hands.
- There are 6"x11" vertical inside liner pockets on each side which as others have noted are not totally "secure". You could change that with a bit of Velcro. Good for a beanie hat, gloves, headlamp, etc while you're sitting around, to keep the hand warmer pockets free for your hands.
- I think it compares favorably with the Patagonia sweater and is a better value.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote an answer about on November 18, 2009

Having used both liquid fuel and canister stoves for hundreds of meals, I prefer canisters up to 13,000 feet. With canisters, you don't get quite as many BTUs per ounce. However, when you factor in the spillage and priming factors for liquid, I think it's about equal. (I also think the extra ounce for a built in ignitor is worth it, because you tend to shut the stove off immediately knowing it's easy to relight, and you waste less fuel lighting it.)

I use the freezer bag food method and only "cook" with treated (Aqua Mira) water. I can easily get 16 to 20 person-meals out of one 8oz canister by cooking on low, making sure there's little heat loss up around the sides of the pot. Your mileage may vary. If you're planning on doing lots of real cooking and/or water purification, then liquid may be worth it.

One more canister tip: I agree with the comment about cold temperature reducing the efficiency of the stove. If you're expecting a cold night, keep your canister in the bottom of your sleeping bag, then stick it inside your jacket when you get up, until you're ready to cook.

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edw3139403

edw3139403 wrote an answer about on November 18, 2009

I agree with the 3/4 windscreen concept, and doubled heavy-duty tin foil is a good flexible option. You don't want to enclose the whole whole stove. Even if you're not concerned about canister explosions, you can damage the valve seal in the canister with too much heat. And these stoves need all the oxygen they can get, especially at altitude, to burn efficiently.

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